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Old 04-04-2008, 05:55 AM   #16
JimVonBaden
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tbirdsp
Another vote here that Stop n Go rubber plugs SUCK (I had 2 failures) and sticky strings work (ran one plugged tire 1000 miles and another 4000 miles).

YMMV
I have run them as many as 9000 miles on a new tire that caught a nail. I much prefer string plugs over the rubber kind!

I even did a tutorial with pics on how! http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=197217

Jim
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Old 04-04-2008, 07:42 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CodyY
Instead of a string plug that will wick road grime and oil up into the tire.
How does road grime 'wick' up anything? As far as I can tell the string type plugs are not going to wick anything. In order for something to wick it has to be fairly open, if these were capable of wicking anything they would also leak air.
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Old 04-04-2008, 09:27 AM   #18
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Plus one thousand on the Stop & Go suck. The steel belts will cut them into and they will fail. I use the strings, just buy a good brand. I buy the packs that have 4 to 6 strings and the glue in them. They are just a few dollars at the local auto supply. I replace them about once a year, that was I know the glue hasn't dried up and is fresh. Buy the heaver T handed pluger tools, they are a lot easyer to use. Also I carry a single edge razor blade to trim of the excess plug sticking out. That way the plug is not working its self back and forth, this can cause one to leak. You can also use two or three to stop a big hole, you can't do that with Stop & Go plugs. I have done that just to get me down the road till I could get a new tire put on. But I have pluged small nail holes and run them. Just replaced one that got a finishing nail after being on only two weeks and ran it for a little over 9,000 miles.

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Old 04-04-2008, 11:45 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by braindead0
How does road grime 'wick' up anything? As far as I can tell the string type plugs are not going to wick anything. In order for something to wick it has to be fairly open, if these were capable of wicking anything they would also leak air.
Those plugs are literally just string that have been coated in a sticky coating. As you drive over the road the string will soak up contaminates and this *COULD* lead to deterioration of the steel belts in the tire. Increasing the likleyhood of catostrauphic failure.

I don't know about you, but I prefer to keep my tires ON the rim. And minimizing any chances of failure is the best way to do so.
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Old 04-04-2008, 12:38 PM   #20
JimVonBaden
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CodyY
Those plugs are literally just string that have been coated in a sticky coating. As you drive over the road the string will soak up contaminates and this *COULD* lead to deterioration of the steel belts in the tire. Increasing the likleyhood of catostrauphic failure.

I don't know about you, but I prefer to keep my tires ON the rim. And minimizing any chances of failure is the best way to do so.
Not coated, impregnated. They wont soak up anything. They have been used in cars and bikes for many many years. At least the steel belts wont shear them off like rubber plugs.

Anyhow, this can go round and round. People will choose what they are comfortable with.

Jim
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Old 04-04-2008, 03:38 PM   #21
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Those string plugs don't wick anything, have no idea how you reached that conclusion. They work great, and they are not JUNK as stated earlier. Cheap and affective is what they are.
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Old 04-06-2008, 10:42 AM   #22
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Go ask any tire shop what the BEST products are for tire repair. 99% of them will tell you Patch Rubber from Myers Tire Supply. A lot of them are willing to pay for the best products, a lot of them are not.

Where do you source your information that they do NOT wick road grime up into a tire's inner structure?

I've spent 10 years in the industry, and I'm telling you, they do. If you use them as a TEMPORARY fix and have the tire repaired asap, they're fine. But using a string plug (or even a mono-fil) as a solution for 6-9k miles like has been noted in this thread is simply a hazard to your own well being.
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Old 04-06-2008, 10:54 AM   #23
CodyY
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VStromTom
JUNK as stated earlier. Cheap and affective is what they are.
Monkey Grip and Vulcan brands are junk. Not string plugs in general. These are BY FAR the lowest quality tire repair products you can find on the market. The patches are thinner, the glue is diluted with alcohol, and their cleaner fluids have silicones that do anything BUT promote patch adhesion. They are cheap and hold air. When i was with Patch Rubber, our "penny patches" were nearly twice the thickness of monkey grip's "Premium" patch.

When a tire has an injury (hole) the strength of that area is now gone. Yeah, it's only 30psi inside a tire. But keep in mind that it refers to pounds of force per square inch. Take the interior surface area of the tire, say 50" in circ. and 8" wide.

50 x 8 x 30psi= 12,000 pounds of pressure inside that wheel.

Guys, theyr'e not just black, round, with a hole in the middle. Literally a bomb on a rim. In a car it's important, on a bike, it's critical. Do you really want to put your life in the hands of the $0.07 patch, or the $.10 string plug?

Just food for thought.
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Old 04-06-2008, 11:11 AM   #24
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I've had years of using the cord type. Installed correctly they haven't been a problem. Having a tight hole & a T-handle inserter helps. It should require a lot of force to insert. If it goes in easy, it won't take.
I don't doubt your experience either, Cody. I haven't tried yours.
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Old 04-06-2008, 12:34 PM   #25
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Given all the options, I prefer string. Red is prefered over black. Given a large puncture, the string can be folded or several strings can be inserted with a lot of glue for a tight plug. Letting such a plug set up for 20min before inflation and riding is recommended.YMMV
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Old 04-06-2008, 01:18 PM   #26
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I like the Slime string plugs. They are brown and seem to be a little thicker and stickier than others I've used

I've run them for thousands of miles and when then finally have failed it's always just been a very slow leak, 1 - 2 psi a day or so

Last year on my way to work I stopped and tried to help a guy on some kinda fancy Beemer tour rig with a flat. He'd used up all his plugs and was not able to get it to seal. I let him use mine and still could not get it to hold air. I watched him a little closer and after inserting the plug he'd air it up (gas station air) to full pressure (40 psi or so) and immediately it would leak, but only down to around 25-30 psi then it would stop. I told him, shit just ride it with lower pressure. But he was like "Oh no, I can't do that this thing would be beeping all kinda crazy if I tried doing that"

I later heard he waited til day light and had to get a tow tuck to come get him
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Old 04-06-2008, 08:39 PM   #27
JimVonBaden
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CodyY
Go ask any tire shop what the BEST products are for tire repair. 99% of them will tell you Patch Rubber from Myers Tire Supply. A lot of them are willing to pay for the best products, a lot of them are not.

Where do you source your information that they do NOT wick road grime up into a tire's inner structure?

I've spent 10 years in the industry, and I'm telling you, they do. If you use them as a TEMPORARY fix and have the tire repaired asap, they're fine. But using a string plug (or even a mono-fil) as a solution for 6-9k miles like has been noted in this thread is simply a hazard to your own well being.
Gee, could it be that most DIYer's can't do the patch themselves is why any dealer would recommend them?

Seriously, you may have done this for years, but your experience does not seem to match with many of ours. You can say it all you want, but it wont change MY mind, or apparently many others.

Jim

PS Show us the literature that PROVES that string plugs "which up roade grime into the interior structure" and I might believe you.
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Old 04-07-2008, 08:58 AM   #28
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The claim that sticky strings could wick anything makes no sense. Wicking requires capillary action and capillary action requires a capillary i.e. a small passage where surface tension can pull a liquid against the force of gravity. If there was a capillary the air would come out. Before it leaked out the surface tension would have to fight against 30 psi pressure, which is also illogical. The only way the sticky string could get junk into a tire is if the outer end was not cut off and the weight of the vehicle forced some of the exposed and dirty string into the tire. This means it was not installed correctly.
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Old 04-07-2008, 10:46 AM   #29
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Digging for my sources. It's somewhere in the literature that I used for a job I quit 2 years ago.


Good thing i'm a pack rat.
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Old 04-07-2008, 02:11 PM   #30
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Please, post your source if you find the info. My source that the strings don't wick is having taken off several tires with the strings in place and not noticing ANY contamination in/on the string, or inside the tire or on the rim. But, I intend to use the strings and run the tires as long as I can, regardless, based upon my past experience with having done so. Supported by most of the other posts on this thread.
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