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Old 06-18-2011, 08:24 PM   #22561
AKASY
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Joined: Nov 2008
Location: NM
Oddometer: 2,122
Wet

Mine has been as resistant to "wet and mud" as any of my other offroad bikes (KTM and XRR). I would hope that a few mud holes would not impact the ignition system.
I've had mine seat deep in the Rio and done hundreds of water crossings with nary a hickup. Hope you can isolate the issue--real pain when you are remote riding.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8_ShQ0vt3fs
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Old 06-19-2011, 07:01 AM   #22562
Chadx
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Joined: Oct 2007
Location: Bozeman, Montana
Oddometer: 2,155
Quote:
Originally Posted by tshrey View Post
I also managed to relocate the level sensor to a spot that reliably brings on the low fuel light with .8 gallons left. Opposite side of the pump from where it starts, it is zip tied to one of the vertical plastic rails that make up the cage.
I moved my fuel sensor when I installed the Safari tank. Like in your IMS, mine comes on with .8 gallons left in the tank (after burning 2.8 gallons of the 3.6 gallon Safari tank capacity). I removed the original fuel sensor clip and it left a perfect spot to zip-tie the sensor. Removing the clip leaves on less thing for the wires to stretch over so they can go lower and leaves the sensor on the original side of the housing. I'll leave this fuel pump in the safari when I move it to my wife's WRR and relocate the sensor on that fuel pump before installing it int he IMS. Details and pictures of the install on my blog here: http://mrchadx.blogspot.com/2011/04/...-safari-3.html


Here is a picture of the clip removed and me holding it with a needlenose pliers.
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Old 06-19-2011, 07:24 AM   #22563
madisonreid
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Joined: Dec 2008
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Safari Tank secondary pump.

Service tech is having difficulty with Safari tank secondary pump to move fuel to primary. It worked on original install and does not allow for bike to turn over. Any thoughts ?
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Old 06-19-2011, 10:43 AM   #22564
mbabc
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Joined: May 2007
Location: Louisville, KY
Oddometer: 1,619
Cee Baileys screen

Hi folks,
Here's a pic of the wr250r Cee Baileys screen in clear on my bike. Used it on a 5 day ride I took last month. Worked great. Haven't seen to many pics, so thought I pass it along.

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Old 06-19-2011, 11:00 AM   #22565
madisonreid
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mbabc View Post
Hi folks,
Here's a pic of the wr250r Cee Baileys screen in clear on my bike. Used it on a 5 day ride I took last month. Worked great. Haven't seen to many pics, so thought I pass it along.

+1....I have the same and appreciate it's benefits.
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Old 06-19-2011, 12:22 PM   #22566
trav72
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Joined: Jul 2007
Location: The garbage state
Oddometer: 872
Quote:
Originally Posted by DougZ73 View Post
Too bad I dropped it like six times today, and came to the realization( which I already knew) That the stock pegs are made from swiss cheese.
Yes, they definitely suck and will not stand up to much abuse. I think you just had 'one of those days'. It happens.
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Old 06-19-2011, 01:21 PM   #22567
Chadx
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Joined: Oct 2007
Location: Bozeman, Montana
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Quote:
Originally Posted by madisonreid View Post
Service tech is having difficulty with Safari tank secondary pump to move fuel to primary. It worked on original install and does not allow for bike to turn over. Any thoughts ?
First, is it correct that the bike runs perfectly when there is enough fuel in the gas tank that the primary pump picks up the fuel directly and doesn't rely on the secondary pump?

The secondary pump works off of vacuum so will only move fuel if there is adequate vacuum. Check all vacuum lines. Not only the vacuum line from the secondary air pump, but all other vacuum lines or capped off nipples to ensure no vacuum leaks. The secondary air-driven pump themselves don't have much that can go wrong with them and are very reliable. A vacuum issue is the likely culprit.

Also, to test, stand the bike upright and put a splash of gas in the gas tank directly on the fuel pump (read: in the primary fuel pump dish) so the primary fuel pump has plenty of gas to pressurize the injector. Start the bike and, with it running, look down into the tank through the filler hole to determine of the secondary fuel pump is pushing fuel into the dish of the primary fuel pump.
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Old 06-19-2011, 01:28 PM   #22568
skierd
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Joined: Jan 2008
Location: Fairbanks, AK
Oddometer: 2,773
Doing an X swap, right now actually, with a guy from Philly. Ran into a snag on the front brake line... how do we disconnect the pressure sensor to remove the brake lever and mount from the handlebars and transfer them between bikes?

THanks
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Old 06-19-2011, 01:54 PM   #22569
madisonreid
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chadx View Post
First, is it correct that the bike runs perfectly when there is enough fuel in the gas tank that the primary pump picks up the fuel directly and doesn't rely on the secondary pump?

The secondary pump works off of vacuum so will only move fuel if there is adequate vacuum. Check all vacuum lines. Not only the vacuum line from the secondary air pump, but all other vacuum lines or capped off nipples to ensure no vacuum leaks. The secondary air-driven pump themselves don't have much that can go wrong with them and are very reliable. A vacuum issue is the likely culprit.

Also, to test, stand the bike upright and put a splash of gas in the gas tank directly on the fuel pump (read: in the primary fuel pump dish) so the primary fuel pump has plenty of gas to pressurize the injector. Start the bike and, with it running, look down into the tank through the filler hole to determine of the secondary fuel pump is pushing fuel into the dish of the primary fuel pump.
Will pass on...Thank You.
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Old 06-19-2011, 02:13 PM   #22570
trav72
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Joined: Jul 2007
Location: The garbage state
Oddometer: 872
Quote:
Originally Posted by skierd View Post
Doing an X swap, right now actually, with a guy from Philly. Ran into a snag on the front brake line... how do we disconnect the pressure sensor to remove the brake lever and mount from the handlebars and transfer them between bikes?

THanks
If you look next to where the connector goes, there is a hole on the underside of the lever. You have to push the little plastic tab on the connector and then pull it out.
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Old 06-19-2011, 02:14 PM   #22571
Jäger
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Joined: Feb 2009
Location: NW MT/SE BC
Oddometer: 709
Another swingarm eaten by the chain...

I hate myself right about now...

[img]To see pic, go to same post at http://wr250rforum.forumotion.com/t4825-swingarm-eaten-by-chain[/img]

I can't tell until I get the swingarm off, but they look pretty deep.

And I have no idea how I got to this point... I'm a mechanical klutz, but I also try and stay right on top of maintenace to try and avoid having my skills put to the test.

I run stock sprocket sizes right now: 13/43, so this won't be a debate about 12 tooth sprockets. I'm more of a backroads motorcycle tourist gawking at the scenery than anything else, so not a lot of hard on/off the throttle.

I changed out my rear tire again about four weeks ago. In the process of adjusting chain tension, etc, I inspected the swingarm chain slider or whatever it is called (I'm away from home right now, from my computer as well as service manual and whatnot) as I usually do. Didn't appear to look any different than previously, still seemed thick enough. Maybe I didn't look as carefully as I should have. Chain tension was set as per spec, about 8mm below the swingarm when under upward tension.

Lubed the chain last about two weeks ago, didn't see anything unusual although I didn't look at the front sprocket while doing this. Certainly no red dust on chain.

Weather has been atrocious around here since early May, so the riding as has been overwhelmingly on the slab, not my usual riding habitat on potholed and washboarded dirt roads - so presumably, a lot less rear shock/swingarm travel happening. But with my WRR my only transport right now, I have been riding it in everything including rain and have been piling up miles faster than normal.

Coming back to the jobsite last night I felt the chain skip. Hmmm... loose chain. Just went out to deal with that, noticed that the rear chain had a deep red dust look to it. Which didn't give me a real good feeling because there's nothing like that around here for soil, but I hadn't put things together yet. Also noticed this chewed section of the mud flap, which I don't remember before, and may or may not have anything to do with this.

[img]To see pic, go to same post at http://wr250rforum.forumotion.com/t4825-swingarm-eaten-by-chain[/img]

Anyways, got the grunge brush out, cleaned the chain up, so never got a picture of that. Adjusted the chain and found it was very, very loose. Way loose. No damaged or broken sprocket teeth that I can find. So it got that sloppy loose in very short order - possibly signalling the chain is worn to the point it will stretch rapidly from now on? That possible? The chain and sprockets are still okay, not hooked, but certainly approaching the end of their service life.

Once the chain was cleaned and lubed, I went to the front. Took the sprocket cover off, saw the damage, and positively freaked. If they sold ass-kicking machines, I'd rent one right now and use it on myself for about an hour.

So I have no idea how I screwed up badly enough for this to happen - and to happen this quickly and to this extent. I've also never had my chain go loose that quickly before, and to be so badly slack. I always torque the rear axle nut to spec, and it certainly felt that tight when I loosened it off today to adjust chain tension.

So down to the questions:

First, suggestions as to how I screwed up bad enough to do this? I've been watching that swingarm protector ever since the first reported case of this happening, but obviously I wasn't watching carefully enough.

Second, I have to run out again on the job so don't have time to start searching right now. Suggestions for places likely to have this in stock and a quick turnaround time for delivery? There's sportsplaza somewhere and a Honda place? Might as well make it someplace where I can get a new 14 tooth and 49 tooth rear sprocket with whatever bolts and a 112 link, master link chain as well... aside from approaching end of life, I don't think it did the chain any favours running in those aluminum grooves and it probably should be done on the same time. Suggestions on the sprockets to order also greatly appreciated as I'm supposed to be working here, not surfing the internet shopping.

Third, there's no Yamaha shop here and no JB weld available to throw on to protect the swingarm from being eaten further. Home, Yamaha shops and all that good stuff is about a four hour ride away on the slab. So my options appear to be to sit picking my nose and wait for packages to arrive, pay somebody going in my general direction to truck the bike back home for me, or ride it as it is for that ride.

I'd prefer to ride it home IF that can be done in some manner that won't add further damage in four hours - I don't know how thick the swingarm is at that point, but the last thing I need right now is to finish eating right through it.

The chain was adjusted to about 8mm swingarm clearance as per the Yamaha chain tension adjustment update. I rode the bike for about 200 yards, just idling along in second gear. I think I might have heard a ticking noise that might have been the chain hitting the swingarm, but at this point I don't know if it is my now hyperactive imagination or not.

With a properly adjusted chain (presumably tightened on the tight side of the adjustment scale), is it possible to ride in a manner that the conditions under which the chain would touch the swingarm are eliminated? Super smooth on and off the gas, avoid bumps that work the rear suspension as much as possible, etc? I don't know the mechanics of what causes the chain to come off the bottom of the front sprocket and pick up into the swingarm, so I'm not sure what to do at the moment.

If it can't be safely ridden in some manner, then I guess I pay for a truck ride or I sit here until some packages arrive...

Thanks for any suggestions and help. Off to work for a few hours where I'll have lots of time to work myself over for being negligent enough to allow this to happen.
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Old 06-19-2011, 05:19 PM   #22572
kawagumby
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Location: California
Oddometer: 586
Is the chain hitting the bottom of the swingarm? I couldn't quite tell from the picture. The chain would be loose under the swingarm during acceleration and loose on top during compression deceleration.

There's a good chance if you adjust it fairly tight - and avoid large bumps (that could possibly stretch the chain further when tight) and avoid hard acceleration and deceleration - you won't have any problems. Using your brakes with no engine compression braking (pull in the clutch) will keep the chain from stretching more during deceleration. Softer, smoother acceleration will do the most for maximizing the bottom swingarm clearance.

Be sure to check the chain link by link to make sure nothing is actually failing, that this is just a case of a quickly wearing chain.

Good luck!
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Old 06-19-2011, 05:26 PM   #22573
skierd
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Joined: Jan 2008
Location: Fairbanks, AK
Oddometer: 2,773
X change complete! Found the tab, thanks trav.





Can't believe how different it rides now, much smoother and much faster and lighter steering. Suspension feels like it works better too. I think im gonna like it, like a whole new bike now.
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2008 Yamaha WR250X
Eastern TAT 8/2009 ~MD-Key West-Oklahoma 4/2011~Maryland to Alaska 3/2012
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Old 06-19-2011, 05:39 PM   #22574
RichardU
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Joined: Aug 2004
Location: Marietta, GA
Oddometer: 886
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jäger View Post
If they sold ass-kicking machines, I'd rent one right now and use it on myself for about an hour.
Those are typically acquired in a process called a wedding.

That sounds like really fast chain wear. I agree with checking the chain thoroughly, and see the bike is riding low for any reason.

If I wanted to ride it without repairs, I would check it every five minutes to start with and increase the interval after I had a sense of what it was doing.

From what I could see of the picture, it looked like filling it with liquid steel, JB Weld etc. would do the job.

This is the reason I keep a spare chain slider.
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Old 06-19-2011, 05:39 PM   #22575
andy mac
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Joined: Apr 2009
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Possibly your chain has some tight links and you adjusted the tension to the loose links, therefore when the suspension compressed and the tight links rotated, the too tight chain began sawing into the swingarm slider (seal guard). This is easy to do last week I overcompensated with the chain adjustment too.

Here's some part numbers and contacts -
JT front sprocket JTF1590SC-14
JT rear sprocket JTR245/2-49
Seal Guard swingarm 3D7-22151-00-00
Front sprocket nut (part number not phone number) 9079-18010
Chain 112 links

http://www.yamahasportsplaza.com/pages/OemParts 503-669-2000

http://www.servicehonda.com/

http://www.cyclepartswarehouse.com/default.asp 866-926-2427

andy mac screwed with this post 06-19-2011 at 05:45 PM
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