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Old 07-07-2013, 10:36 AM   #36406
draley
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Location: Forest, VA (Lynchburg area)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by levain View Post
Alright, thanks for the noob questions. You guys are really helping.

Slowly working a deal on this bike.. $4K, and he'll remove the exhaust/header, and put the stock back on. I keep the exhaust/header for resale. Looks like I can run the programmer on a stock exhaust. Anybody running that? Any issues with that setup or should I also pull the programmer? I wasn't looking for a project. Am I opening a can of worms?

This bike, that is only about 40 miles away, is looking better and better.

Thanks for all the help.
Sounds like the seller is working with you here. I can't answer the programmer question, because I don't have one. But, I've been waiting for someone to answer because I want to know if I need one on my stocker. Hey, those programmers are expensive, so I hope, for your sake that they are useful even with a stock exhaust.
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Old 07-07-2013, 12:05 PM   #36407
indypup
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Originally Posted by bradrh View Post
WRR's on Hurricane Pass, Near Silverton CO

Nice, what tires are you running? I'll be out there on my WRR in a couple of weeks. ;)
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Old 07-07-2013, 12:37 PM   #36408
shep546
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Originally Posted by indypup View Post
Nice, what tires are you running? I'll be out there on my WRR in a couple of weeks. ;)
The rear looks like pirelli mt43 trials tire... not sure on the front.
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Old 07-07-2013, 01:54 PM   #36409
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Originally Posted by dnsjo View Post
Are you using the search engine?

http://www.bikefinds.com/yamaha-wr250r-for-sale

The one in Virginia is a great deal. Just popped up yesterday.
Wow, this I probably live a couple minutes from this guy. If only one for sale in the area popped up BEFORE I drove to NY to buy one.
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Old 07-07-2013, 03:53 PM   #36410
TexaNate
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Hey all,

I've learned a lot from all the knowledge-bombs being dropped in this thread so I thought I'd try to contribute a bit in my own noobly way. If you catch me spouting nonsense about something-or-other, please do point it out.

Back in May I took my 2008 WRR on a 700-mile-ish series of rides around New Jersey and Pennsylvania with my dad, who brought his completely vanilla CRF250L. It was buckets of fun and I hope to put together a full ride report on it at some point but here are a couple photos. The weather found out I had a chance to ride so it promptly ordered up the coldest rain possible.









Anyway, to business -

Before my trip I wanted to carry some some extra fuel. I ride my bike in the icky steep tight slippery stuff a lot so I really didn't want to add too much bulk with the IMS or Safari offerings and they're just too rich for my blood anyhow. I'm a cheap son of a gun with an unhealthy penchant for experimentation so I picked up this $69 rear rack from Seat Concepts. Any reason why nobody else has it? I tried searching. It's really solid, and I like it if you're looking for a cheap rear mounting solution.



I also got this Kolpin Junior fuel pack 1.5gal off Amazon, including all required mounting hardware to go on that rack I mentioned. For a little over $100 shipped, I had 1.5 gallons of auxiliary capacity and a handy rear rack to boot. The Kolpin hasn't leaked a drop (it does have a slightly wonky cap to it but they all do now - it's the law) and I've been really happy with both products. My only complaint: To mount [yourself to] the bike with a tank on the back you either have to have a very high high-kick or you just go over the top-middle of the seat rather than around the back of the bike with your leg. Not a big deal.

I had brand new T63 tires mounted front and rear. They work well on-road and off but they won't have the linkup in the soft sand that my old Desert-IT did. Still, they look like they'll last a long time and the onroad ride is far better.

By the end of the trip I noticed my fork oil seals were leaking quite badly yet again. I've used Sealmate in the past (if you haven't, you should - they get the gunk out of your oil seals so you don't have to replace them so often) but I felt like the damping on my bike wasn't too great compared to the stock WR250R I rode a year ago (nor to my dad's CRF250L). No matter how much I messed around with the clickers, the forks felt really harsh over the bumpy stuff but they would bottom on tiny jumps, and it wasn't easy to predict how the front would react to logs and things like that (if that makes any sense). There was also a pretty noticeable "clunk" under hard compression so I figured something was afunked. Maybe the oil level was too low. I decided I would do some homework and see if I could rebuild the suckers myself rather than paying a mechanic to do it for me. Might learn something.



I learned many things. (By the way, the forks that look like they're attached to the front of my bike in that photo are actually on my dad's KLR 650 in the background)

The fork oil level was HILARIOUSLY low - not even within spittin' distance of stock. The oil that was in there was also pretty grody, not that that means anything. The springs unstretched were at...I think it was 442mm - whatever it was, they were ALMOST too short and probably not stock. I think the dubyar's PO had some work done on them. I'm not a suspension expert but I believe the combination of stiff springs + low oil = pretty goofy damping. I replaced both bushings, the oil seal and dust seal with new ones on both forks and I used a Motion Pro Seal Bullet to slide the fragile oiled rubber seals over the grooves at the top of the tube. I didn't use grease when installing the new seals, haters gonna hate, because people seem divided on that issue (some claim grease traps dirt in the seals and that sort of thing). I just covered the seals in oil before sliding them on. Because it was on sale I used the Motion Pro 46-47mm Seal Driver but honestly a craftier person could probably just use a thin PVC pipe to get the bushings/seals/clips into place easy enough. The Fork Oil Level tool was also handy, in case you're thinking of trying this job yourself. I put it all back together, tightened the fork cap bolt to spec after the lower pinch bolts but before the upper pinch bolts (important). I read somewhere that all these torque settings are super important because those pinch bolts put pressure on your fork and on the cap itself. Too-tight pinch bolts or putting them together in the wrong order can mar the fork tube or cause binding. Side note: When taking the front wheel off, don't loosen all the pinch bolts before loosening the axle bolt like the manual suggests because you won't be able to keep the axle from rotating with the bolt (derp)! Sounds like a no-brainer, I know, but I freaked out a little when I thought my axle bolt may have been stripped.

Anyhow, I wouldn't dive into an inner cartridge revalve but it seems to me like if you have time, you should give this simpler procedure a shot and check your fork oil level before you send your forks off for an $800 rebuild. The "clunk" is completely gone and the forks are definitely better now that the oil level is properly set. Here's hoping the new seals hold - got me a pair of Shock Sox to keep the gunk away from them.

Hope someone learned something. Long story short: New Jersey is cold, aux fuel can be cheap-ish, forks sometimes need attention, and the WRR is a really fun bike.
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Old 07-07-2013, 04:08 PM   #36411
Llamaha
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Originally Posted by Sewerat View Post
I'm thinking I'm gonna need to locate a wrecked bike or possibly just a motor. Mine sounds rattely inside. And drain plug had a good amount of shwarf on it.
What's shwarf? Have you noticed any performance issues? How many Kms? It may just be the timing chain or something...
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Old 07-07-2013, 04:11 PM   #36412
jon_l
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Well writtenTexaNate, and welcome.
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Old 07-07-2013, 04:21 PM   #36413
woofer2609
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Fantastic writeup!

Thanks TexaNate! Hey, for all of us DIY'ers out there, could you post a list of required tools and supplies for those of us contemplating the same task? ( this is self serving, as my left fork leg just started leaking)
I want to take my leg apart, but really don't want to find out I am missing a tool partway through
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Old 07-07-2013, 06:05 PM   #36414
tick-tock
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TexaNate View Post
I'm a cheap son of a gun with an unhealthy penchant for experimentation so I picked up this $69 rear rack from Seat Concepts. Any reason why nobody else has it? I tried searching. It's really solid, and I like it if you're looking for a cheap rear mounting solution.


I'm using the same rack and have been happy with it so far. Much cheaper than the alternatives but still light weight and sturdy. In case anyone is researching this rack and sees the negative comments about the screws being too short, I didn't have any problems with the supplied hardware. The screws fit just fine.
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Old 07-07-2013, 06:16 PM   #36415
tick-tock
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rhollamby View Post
I should qualify my above statements with this... I got 8,500 miles from the stock tires.
You got 8,500 miles out of the stock rear tire?? You must by a light weight or just baby the throttle. I've got a little over 2,000 on mine it looks like it will need replacement soon.
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Old 07-07-2013, 06:17 PM   #36416
HardWorkingDog
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hex wrenches

I'm upgrading my travel tool kit so I won't have to raid my shop tools when out on a trip.
I normally carry 3-4-5 mm hex wrenches, any other sizes needed?

3 mm for the fuel pump
4 mm for the left mirror mount
5 mm for the side covers/exhaust shield

Anything else?
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Old 07-07-2013, 07:53 PM   #36417
bradrh
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Quote:
Originally Posted by indypup View Post
Nice, what tires are you running? I'll be out there on my WRR in a couple of weeks. ;)
Quote:
Originally Posted by shep546 View Post
The rear looks like pirelli mt43 trials tire... not sure on the front.
Yep, mt43 on both bikes on the rear. Front is Mich T63 on one, and Kenda K270 3.25 on the other. I like the mt43 on the back, altho if I could find something similar, but just a little smaller I'd try it. Still undecided on the fronts, I think the t63 is better on gravel, and the k270 better on trails & 4wd roads.
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Old 07-07-2013, 07:55 PM   #36418
Sewerat
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My magnetic drain plug was furry. I have approx 38,000 kms on it now always ridden hard, amsoil used and changed with filter every 3-4000 kms which we all know is approx 10% off
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Old 07-07-2013, 08:09 PM   #36419
TexaNate
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woofer2609 View Post
Thanks TexaNate! Hey, for all of us DIY'ers out there, could you post a list of required tools and supplies for those of us contemplating the same task? ( this is self serving, as my left fork leg just started leaking)
I want to take my leg apart, but really don't want to find out I am missing a tool partway through
So if you haven't already, I would try Seal Mate (or you can try using some other thin sorta-rigid film, cutting it into a hook shape). The idea is to slide a thin little something up into your oil seals to dislodge any dust that might be holding the seal open. It has worked for me in the past for many miles. Just don't scratch your inner fork tube with a screwdriver if you use it to pry the dust seal down!

If you go through with the rebuild, taking a look at your fork on the inside can be totally worth it, especially if your damping performance is iffy (I hear many people saying their fork oil level was too low from the factory). Here's what I used (links are suggestions but by no means the only options):

- Standard sockets/wrenches ranging from 8mm for the fork boots to 21mm (or whatever the size is?) for the axle bolt. Note: You might have an easier time precisely torquing down the fork cap bolt if you remove your handlebars.
- A crescent wrench to act as a spring holder tool as you loosen the fork cap with your socket and ratchet. See this video.
- Flathead screwdriver to pull down the dust seal. Rotate the flathead to pry the dust seal down - don't push too hard or you might jam it down and scratch your inner tube and man is that a PITA.
- Fork rebuild kit. I used the Pivot Works PWFFK-Y13-000 and it contained all the consumables that you want to swap out including oil/dust seals, inner and outer bushings and a few other bits that probably won't even need replacing. You can find cheaper sets that just include the dust and oil seals but I wanted to make sure I had everything in case I got in there and a copper washer was worn out or something.
- 5w fork oil. I made the mistake of buying too little - seems like they sometimes package it in smaller cartons, maybe for top-ups. If you want to change out the oil in both forks, I'd get at least 1.5 quarts (you want some extra to rub on the seals and also so you can use the oil level tool). Yamaha says the quantity is 613cc per fork, but you need to measure it quite carefully yourself, which brings me to...
- Oil level tool. The "oil level" measurement in the shop manual is the distance from the top of the lower tube to the oil level settled at the bottom. This tool makes that really easy to set precisely. You're saving a lot of money over sending it to the mechanic, so why not make it easy?
- 46-47mm fork seal driver. Like I mentioned, you could fashion this out of some PVC pipe if you wanted to. This drives the outer bushing, oil seal and clip up into the upper tube.
- Torque wrench.
- Fork seal bullet or thin polyethylene baggie - this keeps the grooves on top of the fork from tearing up the oil and dust seals as you slide them on the fork.
- Clean cloth on a table where you can lay the spring and stuff.
- Tape measure if you want to measure your spring length.

Optional:
- Soft jaws (don't over-tighten them or they'll mar your fork legs). Something to hold the fork vertical while you put on the seals, etc. and measure the fork oil level. I had some jaws but found my knees to be sufficient.
- Seal grease to apply to the oil seals. There's controversy as to whether this is a good idea since grease attracts dirt. If you don't use grease, put some oil on the seals right before you slide them on over the bullet to minimize the probability of tearing the seal.
- Loctite, depending on your religious beliefs on the matter.

I hope I'm not forgetting anything but the video I linked seems to have it covered pretty well. Any pros out there feel free to correct me!
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Old 07-07-2013, 08:11 PM   #36420
bradrh
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Doesn't anyone make side case covers for the WRR? Any good do it yourself solutions out there? I've searched but haven't seen anything. I'm going to have to quit falling over or get some better side protection, the moose plastic skid plate doesn't cover the side very well. Here's a picture of my little scratch covered up with JB weld. I might just get a flat plate & silicone it to the side.

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