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Old 07-19-2013, 02:19 AM   #36631
mattadv93
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So what would this bike be like as a first bike for a big guy, im 6'4 and 110kg. What the power like compared to a ttr250 as my dad keeps telling me to get the ttr250 but i think i will enjoy this bike better.
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Old 07-19-2013, 06:02 AM   #36632
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It will be fine. I'm a little shorter then you but weighed about the same when I got the bike. Now after having the bike, reading about all the mods and all the shaving of mere ounces off these bikes I found he easiest way to make the bike go faster and be lighter was to make the rider lighter. So that I did, one less burger at the fast old joint at a time and am now at about 215lbs.
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Old 07-19-2013, 10:59 AM   #36633
UtahFox
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dnsjo View Post
I've had my WR for about a year now. After 30 years off from riding, I initially picked up an XT225 (now trying to sell), then the WR. My idea of motorcycling is to get away from traffic, so I go seeking gravel roads in the country and forests. My first endeavors had me wide-eyed and white-knuckled, to say the least, but I gradually got better.
I went and did the American Supercamp for this very reason. I had a lot of mountain biking (in the mountains) experience and that really helped with any technical descents, but powered riding is a different animal otherwise. Simply taking it slow to begin with is a good start, and there are some good books as well to get you started thinking about specific techniques. But I can't recommend the Supercamp highly enough, it gave me a great foundation to build on.
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Old 07-19-2013, 11:15 AM   #36634
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coresports View Post
i would put the entire exhaust back to stock along with the EXUP valve if you have it as that improves low/mid range response, it will be quiet but still peppy and you wont have to repack the muffler. i have ran stock vs modded wrr's side by side and there is just not that much difference, imo. modded bikes have less mpg/more noise and unlike my neighbor with a harley, i want my neighbors to like me!
This is a total exaggeration, I have done all the airbox mods and have the FMF Powercore & Powerbomb. You have to be wringing its neck to get anywhere close to the racket a Harley makes. On top of that, if you are conscious of the noise you don't want to make, you just shift early and it purrs like a kitten. This is my experience, though YMMV.
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Old 07-19-2013, 11:36 AM   #36635
Revvy
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Suspension settings.

I need to be pointed in the right direction to what the suspension settings do. My first bike that I've had the ability to adjust suspension, I really am lacking in understanding what I'm doing when making adjustments.

Right now, I'm dealing with teeth jarring impact when doing 30 over speed bumps. I know I can adjust for rebound and compression, I just don't know if I need to adjust harder or softer on each one.
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Old 07-19-2013, 11:50 AM   #36636
PatrickInVA
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Suspension settings I'm running since like Revvy I know nothing about tweaking on a bike suspension.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chadx View Post
suspension settings:


Here are the settings HF originally posted and they are a great starting point. Tweak for your weight and terrain. When I changed to these settings from stock, it was night and day. Way softer offroad, which helped get the power to the ground. Way softer on the street, which took some getting used to, but is still good enough. Not as good on the street as when stiffened up, but a fine compromise to get what I wanted offroad. I tweaked them a little, but ended up back on these settings in the end.

Front:
Rebound Dampening (top) = 20 clicks out (changed to 15 after break-in)
Compression Dampening (bottom) = 15 clicks out

Rear:
Spring Preload = close to absolute minimum
Rebound Dampening (bottom black knob) = 3 clicks out (max setting)
Compression Dampening (gas cylinder) = 6 clicks out
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Old 07-19-2013, 12:21 PM   #36637
mpatch
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UtahFox View Post
This is a total exaggeration, I have done all the airbox mods and have the FMF Powercore & Powerbomb. You have to be wringing its neck to get anywhere close to the racket a Harley makes. On top of that, if you are conscious of the noise you don't want to make, you just shift early and it purrs like a kitten. This is my experience, though YMMV.
Opening the air box is louder than the exhaust. Just open the air box door and rev the engine a few times and you'll see what I mean.
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Old 07-19-2013, 12:28 PM   #36638
cjbiker
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Revvy View Post
I need to be pointed in the right direction to what the suspension settings do. My first bike that I've had the ability to adjust suspension, I really am lacking in understanding what I'm doing when making adjustments.

Right now, I'm dealing with teeth jarring impact when doing 30 over speed bumps. I know I can adjust for rebound and compression, I just don't know if I need to adjust harder or softer on each one.
I'm pretty sure that's the point of a speed bump

Seriously though, the settings above are a good starting point. But before that, make sure your sag is set correctly. Depending on your weight you may need a softer or stiffer spring, too. Search Google for setting suspension sag on dirt bikes.
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Old 07-19-2013, 01:16 PM   #36639
kawagumby
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Damping settings aside,

If you weigh less than 175 the stock rear spring may be too stiff, you can compensate by going with a little more rider sag than usual - experiment.

The front forks come all screwed up - the spring rate is OK for most middle-sized guys, but the oil is a bit too heavy and there is too much of it.

You can make the forks supple by replacing the oil with a light 5wt - I used amsoil, and setting the oil height to 115 or 120 mm.

My bike came with one fork oil level at 90mm and one at 95. They had a mid-stroke spike and were not getting full travel, and were harsh in general. Now, after the oil change there is more air cushion and the forks go through the full range of travel without a hiccup. They absorb small bumps, rocks, etc completely. Huge difference. I've barely bottomed them on really rough off-road stuff with the 120mm oil setting (I weigh 160). Gone is the "hang on tight or die" syndrome.
IMO they need more compression damping, but that's another story - as they come with tiny 16mm diameter compression stacks that only flow about one-third of what std kayaba compression stacks can flow. Why the factory went to such a small mickey-mouse stack design I cannot understand. Just changing the oil as I've described will make the forks more than acceptable for most riders.

I had the best luck, damping-setting wise with the fork compression all the way in (full compression) and the rear shock with full rebound. I ride off-road on worn out trails with lots of square edged holes and small jumps. Those settings are needed to keep the rear from coming up and pitching you forward off of jumps, water bars, etc. I was running fork rebound at middle area and shock compression light. Everyone rides a little different so you should do some experimenting.

With regard to the rear shock, I finally caved and had GoRace revalve the thing (I also went to the next lighter spring) - his experience will net a one-time revalve - I can attest the shock action is now as good as my off-road bikes. With regard to the front, I'm now setting up WR450 forks for the bike as they are more tunable and have a normal stack size (I ride very technical black-diamond single-track with this beast so I might be demanding a little more than the average rider).

kawagumby screwed with this post 07-19-2013 at 01:36 PM
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Old 07-19-2013, 02:20 PM   #36640
woofer2609
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Ride Report

Took advantage of the good weather here on the west coast:
http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=904941
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Old 07-19-2013, 03:18 PM   #36641
what broke now
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"I'm now setting up WR450 forks for the bike as they are more tunable and have a normal stack size"
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Is that a bolt-up or is conjuring and machining required? Any particular year of 450f?
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Old 07-19-2013, 03:52 PM   #36642
kawagumby
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Quote:
Originally Posted by what broke now View Post
"I'm now setting up WR450 forks for the bike as they are more tunable and have a normal stack size"
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Is that a bolt-up or is conjuring and machining required? Any particular year of 450f?
Looks to be a bolt-up. I'm using 03 450 forks which are the same diameter @ 46mm - the YZ line went to 48mm in 04, but the WR's may have kept the 46's longer, you'd have to check. They're open cartridge with a good off-road stack that is easily modified. The springs are close too, at .46 stock WRF vs .47 stock WRR, but it looks like the WRR springs will fit with a short spacer if need be.

The 450 fork travel is about 1.2" longer so I'm likely to use a 15mm riser to get the stock handlebars to clear keeping the same geometry as I have now. I've done several swaps like this on other bikes, this should be pretty simple.

edit: I forgot to mention that the fork protectors for each bike are different with a different mounting bolt pattern at the fork bottom. What I've done on my other conversions is make a brake line bracket mount on the 450 fork protector (which used to have the under-the-axle brake line routing) that can attach the WRR brake line bracket.

Bad news: The WRR axle is of smaller diameter - along with the wider front brake rotor this means the best way to get the job done is with the entire front wheel off the donor bike. I have one so I should get the bike on the trail next week - I'll report back on how it works.

kawagumby screwed with this post 07-19-2013 at 04:47 PM
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Old 07-19-2013, 04:25 PM   #36643
mpatch
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kawagumby View Post
Damping settings aside,

If you weigh less than 175 the stock rear spring may be too stiff, you can compensate by going with a little more rider sag than usual - experiment.

The front forks come all screwed up - the spring rate is OK for most middle-sized guys, but the oil is a bit too heavy and there is too much of it.

You can make the forks supple by replacing the oil with a light 5wt - I used amsoil, and setting the oil height to 115 or 120 mm.

My bike came with one fork oil level at 90mm and one at 95. They had a mid-stroke spike and were not getting full travel, and were harsh in general. Now, after the oil change there is more air cushion and the forks go through the full range of travel without a hiccup. They absorb small bumps, rocks, etc completely. Huge difference. I've barely bottomed them on really rough off-road stuff with the 120mm oil setting (I weigh 160). Gone is the "hang on tight or die" syndrome.
IMO they need more compression damping, but that's another story - as they come with tiny 16mm diameter compression stacks that only flow about one-third of what std kayaba compression stacks can flow. Why the factory went to such a small mickey-mouse stack design I cannot understand. Just changing the oil as I've described will make the forks more than acceptable for most riders.

I had the best luck, damping-setting wise with the fork compression all the way in (full compression) and the rear shock with full rebound. I ride off-road on worn out trails with lots of square edged holes and small jumps. Those settings are needed to keep the rear from coming up and pitching you forward off of jumps, water bars, etc. I was running fork rebound at middle area and shock compression light. Everyone rides a little different so you should do some experimenting.

With regard to the rear shock, I finally caved and had GoRace revalve the thing (I also went to the next lighter spring) - his experience will net a one-time revalve - I can attest the shock action is now as good as my off-road bikes. With regard to the front, I'm now setting up WR450 forks for the bike as they are more tunable and have a normal stack size (I ride very technical black-diamond single-track with this beast so I might be demanding a little more than the average rider).
I ride behind ktm's more than most and as I'm bouncing around they just coast on. Can the wrr's suspension be made anywhere near that of a WP ktm? The only strong arm I have is that I ride there/back and they trailer it,

+30-50 pounds and -5-20hp with second rate components but I try to keep up
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Old 07-19-2013, 04:44 PM   #36644
kawagumby
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Probably not in terms of hard, fast riding, but in terms of control and plushness and improving speed with the WRR, I highly recommend the GoRace shock revalve and modifying the fork as noted. But in all fairness, a 300 lb bike even with a high-end suspension isn't going to float along. I'm enjoying riding my WRR in tighter situations - I see it as a challenge - and I'm having fun trying different mods too.
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Old 07-19-2013, 04:58 PM   #36645
what broke now
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"I should get the bike on the trail next week - I'll report back on how it works."

__________________________________________________ ___________

Thanks for the effort, looks like up to 2004 the wrf's had 46mm.

Did you not think you could make adequate improvement to the wrr's shim stacks, so you went to the swap?
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