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Old 09-18-2013, 11:17 PM   #38056
Reeksy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaymienRules View Post
I've never found pouring the rotopax into the tank to be a real issue. It's not like I the bike runs out of fuel before I need a break. The rotopax does, however, allow you to choose the size tank you want to carry, allow you to share that precious fuel with others that may also need it, still let you store stuff on top of the can, and costs about half of the Nomad. That said, my personal sweet spot has been the ims 3 gal, with the 1 or 2 gal rotopax when needed. I think it ended up being cheaper to buy the 3gal ims tank and 1 gal rotopax than just the larger ims or safari tank. All the benefits, minimal drawbacks.

Also, check the vendors section, I believe forum members get 15% off the rotopax site.
'Cos i'm already in Australia it works out cheaper to get the Safari than the IMS, and I have the Force rad guard which it's designed around.

Currently I get three return trips to work on the standard tank (less if I take dirt detours ) and I pass two servos (gas stations) on the way. Using a rotopax to me is no different than stopping at the servo ... except I suppose I can stop in a different location. Plus in Australia I think the price of a rotopax and bracketry, plus a rack, is more than a Nomad.

Granted, the rack would be something I'd purchase at some point anyway.
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Old 09-19-2013, 12:14 AM   #38057
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Valid points on cost. I had the rotopax mounted on he back before I bought the ims. It worked, it was inexpensive, but i still ended up buying a bigger tank anyway. everything but a replacement tank was a fix, but not a solution. I'd bet that buying the nomad would still leave you wanting the safari. The nomad tanks look like they would certainly carry more fuel, but the design prevents any other use of that space.
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Old 09-19-2013, 01:32 AM   #38058
theMISSIONARY
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ReeksyOfOz View Post
'Cos i'm already in Australia it works out cheaper to get the Safari than the IMS, and I have the Force rad guard which it's designed around.

Currently I get three return trips to work on the standard tank (less if I take dirt detours ) and I pass two servos (gas stations) on the way. Using a rotopax to me is no different than stopping at the servo ... except I suppose I can stop in a different location. Plus in Australia I think the price of a rotopax and bracketry, plus a rack, is more than a Nomad.

Granted, the rack would be something I'd purchase at some point anyway.

it was cheaper for me to get the IMS than the Safari
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Old 09-19-2013, 02:44 AM   #38059
sequent
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ReeksyOfOz View Post
I'm looking to increase my range, 100 miles is fine when i'm on local trails, but for longer trips and commuting more fuel would be good.

I'm considering the Safari tank, but I'm also wondering if anyone has tried a Nomad Tank.

According to the owner tanks 3, 5 and 7 will fit the WRR.

Cost isn't an issue, I like the idea of being able to remove the extra fuel capacity for short rides and add it again for longer rides, but how practicable are the nomad tanks?

And would it annoy me taking up rack space on longer trips?
I've run a Nomad Tank No.1 on my WRR for the last two years (the one designed for XRs, TTRs etc). It fits fine behind the seat, although I had to add some foam (around 1cm thick) under the tank to ensure it had what I considered enough clearance between my FMF exhaust and the tank.



I've just sold that tank and replaced it with a Nomad No.7 tank because the previous Nomad No.1 tank wouldn't fit with the Wolfman pannier racks. The No.7 tank sits higher, more "on the guard" than "over the guard" so-to-speak. It doesn't have the "wings" that hang down. It seems to fit well.





About the usage, I never bothered bolting it down, just used the two rubber straps to connect it and it never moved. I also didn't plumb it in (put a stopper on the outlet, and just removed and tipped it in when needed). The No.1 tanks was lower profile and you could just strap a bag down on top of it. The No.7 tank is sloped towards the seat, so I think any bag would slide forward to the rear of the seat, which may or may not be a problem...

Dave.
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Old 09-19-2013, 04:25 AM   #38060
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Superstar View Post
Any suggestions on these? The stock blinkers are atrocious and the replacements I find on eBay are all 2-wire (no running lights, blinker only). I'd like to keep all the OEM functionality in a smaller, better looking form factor.
If you go with LED type blinkers you can install the 12O'Clock Labs Turn Signal Running light adaptors. They take three wires in and give you two wires out. The turn signals will then be on like a parking light and flash when you use them as a turn signal

http://shop.12oclocklabs.com/index.p...&product_id=70
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Old 09-19-2013, 04:29 AM   #38061
rsteiger
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ReeksyOfOz View Post
I thought about the rotopax, but that needs removing and pouring into the tank, whereas the advantage of the Nomad is it feeds into the fuel line... I know their marketing doesn't mention that for some reason...
You might want to check and make sure that the tank will work with an FI system. I can see if gravity feeding a carb fuel line but the WRR is FI and the line coming out of the tank to the motor is under pressure.

If you were going to have it feed the main tank instead you would have to punch a hole in the tank and add a fitting.
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Old 09-19-2013, 05:05 AM   #38062
byron555
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Tanks...

Quote:
Originally Posted by HardWorkingDog View Post
If cost isn't an issue, just get the Safari. You'll not notice the extra weight (if any) when riding trails, it adds protection to the radiator, and 3.7 gals is the sweet spot as far I'm concerned. And you'll still have rear luggage space.

I really like my Safari tank.
I really like my 3.1 IMS, it is cheapest of the replacement tanks, uses stock shrouds (which I like) and the extra gallon is night and day for usability. The safari is really nice too, but more $$$ and of course .6 gallon more. I am not a big fan of the big IMS, it seems so wide... I prefer the 3.1 because 99.9% of the time it is enough fuel for me.
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Old 09-19-2013, 05:22 AM   #38063
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ReeksyOfOz View Post
I thought about the rotopax, but that needs removing and pouring into the tank, whereas the advantage of the Nomad is it feeds into the fuel line... I know their marketing doesn't mention that for some reason...
I wonder how the Nomad plumbs into the FI system? The rotopax fill drill only takes a couple of minutes, and I need a stretch break every hour or two anyhow, so its really no big deal time or effort wise for me ymmv.

Now if I was retired and could ride more than day/weekend trips, I'd just get the big Safari/IMS and be done with it. Everything else is just a range band aid at that point.
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Old 09-19-2013, 07:06 AM   #38064
sturgeon
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3.1 IMS plus 0,1, or 2 Rotopax 1-gallon cans gives me more range than I've ever needed. About 500 km with both Rotopax cans mounted and filled. I use a Rotopax as soon as I figure there's enough room in the IMS to hold the extra 4 liters. The time to remove a Rotopax and pour it into the tank is minimal.
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Old 09-19-2013, 07:57 AM   #38065
GSBS
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My 2 on carrying fuel...

I went with the big (4.75-gallon) IMS tank and couldn't be happier. Mine actually held over 4.8 gallons the first time I filled it up.

With this tank the additional weight from the extra gas is carried low in the frontal lobes and causes no adverse handling issues.

I previously had a 1.5-gallon Kolpin, which mounts the same as the Rotopax 1-gallon, that I attached to the rear rack. That meant I had a more than 10 pounds of additional weight - including the gas, mount and can itself - up high on the bike. The larger 2-gallon Rotopax cans are usually mounted to a rack on the side of the bike which I believe would adversely affect handling unless you mounted one to each side. It just seems to me that it makes more sense to have your fuel centered on the bike and as low as possible - in the GAS TANK.

The larger IMS tank was less money than the Safari, installed very easily and has given no issues in the 12K miles I've had it. When empty, there is little additional weight compared to the stock steel tank and shrouds and it tapers back to the width of the stock tank where my legs are, so I have had no problems with handling. As mentioned above, the "wings" also provide some protection for the radiator as well.

With mine I get between 235 and 260 miles on a tank depending on how hard I ride and don't even think about looking for gas until I'm approaching 200 miles. If I know I'll be on a more technical/challenging trail I just plan when I buy fuel so it won't be topped off while on the trail.

Anyway, for me and the way I ride the IMS was the ideal solution.

My WR:
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Old 09-19-2013, 08:48 AM   #38066
Scott_PDX
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GSBS View Post
I went with the big (4.75-gallon) IMS tank and couldn't be happier. Mine actually held over 4.8 gallons the first time I filled it up.

With this tank the additional weight from the extra gas is carried low in the frontal lobes and causes no adverse handling issues.

I previously had a 1.5-gallon Kolpin, which mounts the same as the Rotopax 1-gallon, that I attached to the rear rack. That meant I had a more than 10 pounds of additional weight - including the gas, mount and can itself - up high on the bike. The larger 2-gallon Rotopax cans are usually mounted to a rack on the side of the bike which I believe would adversely affect handling unless you mounted one to each side. It just seems to me that it makes more sense to have your fuel centered on the bike and as low as possible - in the GAS TANK.

The larger IMS tank was less money than the Safari, installed very easily and has given no issues in the 12K miles I've had it. When empty, there is little additional weight compared to the stock steel tank and shrouds and it tapers back to the width of the stock tank where my legs are, so I have had no problems with handling. As mentioned above, the "wings" also provide some protection for the radiator as well.

With mine I get between 235 and 260 miles on a tank depending on how hard I ride and don't even think about looking for gas until I'm approaching 200 miles. If I know I'll be on a more technical/challenging trail I just plan when I buy fuel so it won't be topped off while on the trail.

Anyway, for me and the way I ride the IMS was the ideal solution.
+1

Started with a Roto Pax, then then IMS, Then the IMS + Rotopax, and finally a nice blue IMS 4.8 Gallon. Way better!
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Old 09-19-2013, 09:09 AM   #38067
levain
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GSBS View Post
I went with the big (4.75-gallon) IMS tank and couldn't be happier. Mine actually held over 4.8 gallons the first time I filled it up.

With this tank the additional weight from the extra gas is carried low in the frontal lobes and causes no adverse handling issues.

I previously had a 1.5-gallon Kolpin, which mounts the same as the Rotopax 1-gallon, that I attached to the rear rack. That meant I had a more than 10 pounds of additional weight - including the gas, mount and can itself - up high on the bike. The larger 2-gallon Rotopax cans are usually mounted to a rack on the side of the bike which I believe would adversely affect handling unless you mounted one to each side. It just seems to me that it makes more sense to have your fuel centered on the bike and as low as possible - in the GAS TANK.

The larger IMS tank was less money than the Safari, installed very easily and has given no issues in the 12K miles I've had it. When empty, there is little additional weight compared to the stock steel tank and shrouds and it tapers back to the width of the stock tank where my legs are, so I have had no problems with handling. As mentioned above, the "wings" also provide some protection for the radiator as well.

With mine I get between 235 and 260 miles on a tank depending on how hard I ride and don't even think about looking for gas until I'm approaching 200 miles. If I know I'll be on a more technical/challenging trail I just plan when I buy fuel so it won't be topped off while on the trail.

Anyway, for me and the way I ride the IMS was the ideal solution.

My WR:
My reserve comes on at around 70 miles, and that is a real bummer. Sounds like fuel stuck in the wings isn't an issue with the big IMS? My guess is that you get used to the extra fuel weight, and it becomes a non issue, but do you remember thinking about it the first couple rides fully gassed up?

On another note, that looks like a Q4 pipe, but what header is that? Stock?
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Old 09-19-2013, 09:28 AM   #38068
GSBS
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Quote:
Originally Posted by levain View Post
My reserve comes on at around 70 miles, and that is a real bummer. Sounds like fuel stuck in the wings isn't an issue with the big IMS? My guess is that you get used to the extra fuel weight, and it becomes a non issue, but do you remember thinking about it the first couple rides fully gassed up?

On another note, that looks like a Q4 pipe, but what header is that? Stock?
Honestly couldn't tell any difference handling between the IMS tank vs. stock when both were full. Stock is 2 gallons and IMS has about 2.8 gallons more. Gas weighs around 6 pounds per gallon, so let's round it off and say it's about 18 more pounds (6x3 gallons). That's an additional nine pounds on each side of the bike, the weight concentrated just below and in front of my knees. This weight in this location I believe would have the least handling impact compared to other places you might strap on more gas... i.e. - to a rear luggage rack or side mounted rack.

I can't remember which FMF pipe it is - cheapest one if that helps. And yes, that's the stock header pipe. I don't use a programmer either, just adjusted the CO settings in the bike's onboard computer to richen up the mix. That was over 15K miles ago and the bike runs great.
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Old 09-19-2013, 10:48 AM   #38069
etingelefunts
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GSBS,
Is that camera settings, or an orange(ish) tank ?

Mine wont drain the last 3-4" in each wing, yet still requires 4.75 gallons to top off. My guess is the vaccum pump thingy reaches its mechanical limit trying to lift fuel that far with reduced down pressure of nearly empty tank.
No issues with mine either.
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Old 09-19-2013, 11:07 AM   #38070
Pantah
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Mine wears a Safari 3.7 gallon tank. Very nice part. My longest between gas was 214 miles. It took about 3.4 gals I think. It was riding mostly fast gravel in on the CDR in Wyoming.
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