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Old 02-16-2014, 12:55 PM   #40321
henrymartin
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Servicing my forks today. Do you guys want a step-by step with pics?
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Old 02-16-2014, 01:09 PM   #40322
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which No Toil filter to use?

http://www.rockymountainatvmc.com/p/...=1392566400673
or
http://www.rockymountainatvmc.com/p/...Filter?v=10553

Do the wr250 need the cage on the 1st link or the one on the second link be just fine plus the metal holder that is already on the air box

BTW the bike have a K&N filter now, but due to the dirt that is like dust in my area I would need better protection.
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Old 02-16-2014, 01:14 PM   #40323
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Quote:
Originally Posted by henrymartin View Post
Servicing my forks today. Do you guys want a step-by step with pics?
Yes please
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Old 02-16-2014, 01:23 PM   #40324
DougZ73
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dazler View Post
which No Toil filter to use?

http://www.rockymountainatvmc.com/p/...=1392566400673
or
http://www.rockymountainatvmc.com/p/...Filter?v=10553

Do the wr250 need the cage on the 1st link or the one on the second link be just fine plus the metal holder that is already on the air box

BTW the bike have a K&N filter now, but due to the dirt that is like dust in my area I would need better protection.
I use a notoil filter with stock filter cage.

Sent from my SCH-S738C using Tapatalk 2
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Old 02-16-2014, 02:22 PM   #40325
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oxygenrace View Post
yes please
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Old 02-16-2014, 02:31 PM   #40326
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DougZ73 View Post
I use a notoil filter with stock filter cage.

Sent from my SCH-S738C using Tapatalk 2
Thanks, so it would need the cage? I dont have it as the K&N dont needed it.
Would the No toil filter cage fit just fine in the WRR that you know
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Old 02-16-2014, 03:01 PM   #40327
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yes please

Quote:
Originally Posted by henrymartin View Post
Servicing my forks today. Do you guys want a step-by step with pics?
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Old 02-16-2014, 03:58 PM   #40328
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Quote:
Originally Posted by henrymartin View Post
Servicing my forks today. Do you guys want a step-by step with pics?
Sure if its not too late.
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Old 02-16-2014, 05:25 PM   #40329
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dazler View Post
which No Toil filter to use?...
I've found the Yamaha oem air filter to hold up with NoToil just fine.......and it costs less than the aftermarket stuff.

ymmv
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Old 02-16-2014, 05:38 PM   #40330
henrymartin
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I just finished. It took longer than usual - my first time with USD forks. I will post something up tonight.
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Old 02-16-2014, 06:26 PM   #40331
zekester63
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RiosLibres View Post
Hello all!

This question may have been asked already, but I could not find an answer so here it goes:

I found the OEM fuell pump in bikebandit for 302 $, and then came across this Fuel Pump form Cycleworks (justGustTanks) at almost one third of the price, 115 $. Anyone has any advice on this or other replacement pump for the wrr? In case that fuell pump works, is there anything else I should buy?

Here in Paraguay there arent many choices ( I believe mine is the only WRR in the whole country )

Thanks!

I did the swap with an eBay pump I got for $34.95. The pump is made by HighFlowFuel.com. I had read the posts I could find on disassembly, and just decided to go for it. My stock fuel pump still worked, but I had experienced a couple episodes last summer that made me wonder about it going out. Anyway, the swap went well, and the bike fired right up when I got it all back together.

Here's the kit on eBay (never mind the listing's main picture):

http://www.ebay.com/itm/161028028513...S:3160&vxp=mtr

I used the pump, o-ring and filter, but not the hose clamps and piece of fuel line that came with it. Also, the new little retainer washer that holds the filter onto the pump didn't fit tight enough, so I was able to get the old one off and use it, without fear of it coming off.

Overall I'm pleased with the job, and hope this new pump lasts me many miles. I have a trip planned to Utah later this year and I didn't want the stock unit (with 7K miles) suddenly giving up on me, leaving me no choice but to replace it with a whole new unit costing me $250 (plus overnight shipping, etc.).

Here's a few pics:

Stock unit:


New pump:


All done:
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Old 02-16-2014, 07:06 PM   #40332
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Seems almost worth grabbing one as a spare.

Would you class this as a roadside fix ... apart from the minor hassle of flipping the tank off, it doesn't look like it needs any special tools?
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Old 02-16-2014, 07:21 PM   #40333
zekester63
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reeksy View Post
Seems almost worth grabbing one as a spare.

Would you class this as a roadside fix ... apart from the minor hassle of flipping the tank off, it doesn't look like it needs any special tools?

Well, I would never want to do this repair road/trail side. It is a REAL booger to get the thing apart, and that's with having "all" the tools I own at my disposal, a clean bench, good lighting, and no environmental factors making it more difficult than it already is.

That's also assuming you can take the tank off and save the gas in something else so you actually have gas to continue your journey in the event you do get things working again.

With that said, I suppose if your pump craps out on you and you do have a spare, and absolutely no help or transport within any reasonable distance, it might be worth attempting. You really don't have much to lose at that point. But even with my "experience" now doing this, I'm just not sure I could do it trail side, with limited tools.
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Old 02-16-2014, 08:05 PM   #40334
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i guess I was comparing to swapping the tank out for a Safari tank. From that experience i'd happily pull the tank and carefully remove the pump ... assuming the tank was less than half full I suppose.

At least trailside i'd 'normally' have a second pair of hands to help I guess.

Quote:
Originally Posted by zekester63 View Post
Well, I would never want to do this repair road/trail side. It is a REAL booger to get the thing apart, and that's with having "all" the tools I own at my disposal, a clean bench, good lighting, and no environmental factors making it more difficult than it already is.

That's also assuming you can take the tank off and save the gas in something else so you actually have gas to continue your journey in the event you do get things working again.

With that said, I suppose if your pump craps out on you and you do have a spare, and absolutely no help or transport within any reasonable distance, it might be worth attempting. You really don't have much to lose at that point. But even with my "experience" now doing this, I'm just not sure I could do it trail side, with limited tools.
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Old 02-16-2014, 09:31 PM   #40335
henrymartin
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WR250R fork service


During my last ride I had noticed some fork fluid leaking. While that was due to the icy conditions we encountered, and any water immediately freezing on the forks and the ice getting under the seals, I figured it was time to replace the seals and change the fluid anyway. At over 8k miles on the clock, it doesn't hurt to look at the internals.

The first thing that surprised me was how clean the fork fluid was. I had seen some forks (on other bikes) in the past, where the fluid was all dirty and cloudy. The WR oil was fairly clean, with no metal particles in it, and only slight discoloration.

So, this being my first time tackling USD forks, it took me longer than usual. On conventional forks, the procedure is much simpler, and takes only a few minutes. On the WR there are more parts to change, and the seals cannot be driven in with the inner/outer tubes apart.

These are the tools I used:
Nothing special. A Torque wrench, 17mm wrench (for a nut on the damper rod), 14mm hex (for damper rod base valve), a screwdriver (to pry the old dust seal, plus retainer ring), a small brass hammer, and an electric impact driver (air gun would have been better), and a little piece of aluminum barstock I had, where I notched it to keep the damper rod from spinning.

You will need seals of your choice and some fork oil. I went with Yamaha seals (the oem lasted fine) and Maxima 5W oil - 2 liters.

Loosen the fork caps on the bike. Once you remove the forks, remove the fork caps completely and turn the forks upside down. When all the oil drains, take out the springs and the little rod in the damper, move damper rod up and down a few times to drain rest of the oil, and set the forks on a bench.

With a screwdriver, carefully pry the dust seals out. Make sure not to scratch the forks! With the dust seals out, you can now see the retainer ring. Remove that as well. You can now hold the outer fork and carefully pull the inner fork tube out. It won't be easy, but it will work. This will also remove the oil seal. I ended up using the inner tube to drive the seal out, and it took only a few quick pulls.

Next, loosen the base valve - 14mm hex. First you have to remove the rubber plug in there (again, a screwdriver or a pick). The base valve is torqued and has Loctite. I used a wrench, then spun it fast with the impact driver. One of them came out fine, the other spun inside, hence the aluminum bar.
Once the base valve comes out, pull the damper rod, and set it aside.


Next I pulled the old bushings and seals off. (Yamaha calls the bushing "piston metal)

I wiped everything clean, then sprayed brake cleaner through all holes and on all internal surfaces. You do not want any sand or dirt in there. Here is a nice, clean fork.
Here is the old bushing vs the new bushing. Look at the wear on the inside (new one is on the left):
Next, with the forks clean, spread a little fork oil on the inner tube, and get a small plastic bag. I used the one that the parts came in. Slide the bag over the fork, lube it with some fork oil, and push your seals over it. This prevents damage to the seals during installation.
And here is how it all stacks up. Dust seal on top, bushing on the bottom.
Now, both my damper rods had a little bit of rust. I cleaned that off with 2000 grit sandpaper soaked in oil.
Now, grab your clean outer tube and your clean base valve, spread some oil on the o-rings and on the damper rod where it touches the inside of the fork tube, and a bit of Loctite on the threads. Slide the damper rod all the way in, until it touches bottom. Hand thread the base valve into the damper rod, then use your impact driver (or air gun) to tighten it. If you go fast enough, it won't spin. Next, torque the base valve to 40ft/lbs (per manual).

With that done, slide your inner tube into the outer tube (lube the bushings and seals). The first bushing goes in easy, the second is a bit of a pain to seat. I used a small punch and a very gentle hand to get it started. Push it deep enough so you can start your oil seal. I don't have a seal driver, so again using a flat punch and a very gentle tapping all around, I seated my seal until I could see the retaining ring slot. Pop the ring back in, make sure it seats all the way, and compress your fork all the way.

Standing the fork vertically, fill it to the top of inner tube with your fork oil. You have to remove the spring guide and the rod inside the damper for this procedure)
Move the damper rod in and out about ten times (slowly) and add fork oil as air is displaced. Then move your outer tube up and down (a little) about ten times, again adding oil to maintain oil level at the top.
When no more air escapes and the oil level does not drop, use your method of choice to extract enough oil to achieve oil level of 105mm from top (per manual). My method of choice is an old sprayer top with a straw cut to length. I just rest it on top of the fork tube and pump until no more comes out. It works great.
Next, put your clean spring back in, slide the damper rod up (took me a while to figure that one - I used a screwdriver between the coils to push against the nut on top). Once fully extended, put the collar back on the spring and thread your top cap by hand. Using the 17mm wrench, hold the lower nut, and using a 19mm socket torque the cap on at 11ft/lbs (per manual).

Bring the outer tube up, and temporarily crew in your cap bolt. Voila. You'll have to torque that after you have the forks back in the tripples.

What I do is to leave the dust seal on the fork leg without installing it. After I'm all done with all of the above, I compress the forks several times by hand, applying as much pressure as possible. Just push the fork leg against the floor (with a rag as a cushion) and lean against it. After I get tired of doing it, I look down at the oil seal to make sure that no oil leaked out. If satisfied, I press the dust seal in and call it a day.

Have fun!

Disclaimer. These are only my observations. Use your own judgement and your head. My writeup does not replace the use of factory service manual and all workplace safety measures. You cannot hold me responsible for doing something stupid.
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