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Old 05-12-2008, 10:13 PM   #16
Zebedee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick Makwell
link doesnt work? ...
Oops ... Should be OK now
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Old 05-13-2008, 05:20 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick Makwell
lfailing that, what other bikes have 36mm forks?
All Airheads from 1969 to 1987 had 36mm fork tubes, but the legs evolved over the years to accomodate everything form drum over single ATE to dual ATE to single brembo to dual Brembo front brakes. Triple trees were the same for all except for the R45/R65 family which was always a bit different.

There might be a lot more subtle differences between the R45/R65 and the "mainstream" Airheads /5/6/7 that I am not aware of, because I never had a R45/R65.
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Old 05-13-2008, 06:50 PM   #18
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so has anyone had any experience in putting different front ends on Airheads - i have seen some dirtbike Airhead threads....might have a closer look.

Parts for Jap bikes are a LOT cheaper than BMW equivalents.....

I have a picture somewhere of an R100 with a GSXR1000 front end, but that may be overkill for a R65!!!!
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Old 05-13-2008, 07:07 PM   #19
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Nick,

Have a look here this guy is suggesting that BMW and Honda CR 500 head bearings are the same dia, (different length).

I know nowt about other head bearings, but it would be nice to think that other Honda's used the same bearings, and therefore that you could swap the front end without too much grief.

Any other info gratefully received ...

Cheers

John
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Old 05-13-2008, 07:55 PM   #20
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Thanks John - Ive had a good read and copied some photos...

I wonder what the head bearings spec is for the Honda CR500 - might be a range of front ends that are similar that are able to be used....
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Old 05-13-2008, 08:07 PM   #21
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Just found this on fleabay....

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/HONDA...m140231053807&


One could assume that they share the same steering head bearing as the CR500 (1990-2001) with the XR650 front end (from 2002-2006)...might be different triple tree and hence different spacer than Udo's, but same steering head...

and XR650 parts are widely available.....more research required!!!

Thanks again John for the link.
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Old 05-14-2008, 06:37 PM   #22
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I just bought a spare triple clamp for the R65 and yeah, the upper plate is very thick and very similar to my K1100RS - but it cant be the same fork dimensions surely - I thought K bikes had 41mm forks, whereas the airheads had 36mm?

Or was it the early K bikes (i.e the 2 valves with snowflake wheels) and then they upgraded to the 41mm Marzochhi??????
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Old 05-14-2008, 08:01 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by Nick Makwell
...
Thanks again John for the link.
No worries Nick,

I'm following your progress with keen interest, but a couple of pics wouldn't go amiss ...

Have a good 'un

John
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Old 05-15-2008, 06:14 AM   #24
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Hi Nick,

hello from Germany! Do not be mistaken: The upper yoke of the 65 is thicker than the much-criticised yokes of the big airheads and it does resemble the K-yokes (it appears there used to be quite some continuity in the design of many parts over a considerable period of time), but the K bikes had 41.3 mm fork legs from the very beginning (1984? 1983?). This difference in diameter does make a difference, I can tell you because I happen to have two airheads with K 100 forks. If I were you I would definitely prefer the more stable K forks (or the Showa-type fork used in the R 100R) to the R65 forks.
The choice of forks does have some impact on the wheels you can use:
It is possible to have the "classic" spoke wheels in the R 65 fork (36 mm diameter), or you might choose a cast wheel (1.85 x 18 snowflake or 2.15 x 18 LS-design) which would match rear wheels (2.5 x 18 snowflake or LS-design).
The K-forks accommodate the spoke wheel used in the R 100R models or, if you prefer a more classic look, you might have a custom-made wheel using a hub from an R 100R - which is an expensive option.

I hope this helps a bit.

greetings

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Old 05-15-2008, 06:52 AM   #25
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Thanks Alfons,

yeah i did some more research and ALL K bikes have the 41mm forks, across all types.

I wonder if the K triple tree goes into the R frame?

mmm...too much to think about.

I really dont want to go with spoked wheels though, two reasons:

1. pain in arse to clean (I hate the wheels on my GS, wish I had bought the cast ones)
2. I saw a custom Ducati with polished cast wheels (off FZR600 and 1000 front and rear respectively) and said yep - I want that!
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Old 05-15-2008, 07:38 AM   #26
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...well Nick,

We're on opposite sides of the continent, and opposite sides of the wheel issue.

I'd be much happier loosing the snowflakes, and going to conventional spokes and rims, and I'm sure my R65 transformation is going to take a bit longer than your 'cos mine is my one and only bike (in Oz at least).

I'm currently researching trail tech Vapor's as a replacement speedo and thinking about high exhaust alternatives ... will the standard can off a KTM 525 (or similar) work with the R65 ... answers on a postcard please.

Alfons, thanks for the input. Keep it coming.

Cheers

John
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Old 05-15-2008, 11:08 AM   #27
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Hello from Germany again!

@ Nick: the K triple tree goes into the R frame without the slightest modification - it uses the same size of bearings, and even the steering locks fits. If you want do go for cast wheels, there is a problem: the K fork takesthe Y-spoke wheels and the 3-spoke wheels of the K 75/K100, but you will need a rear wheesl that looks the same, and there might be a definite problem as there is no BMW-made solution.

However, I have seen a K-fork with a snowflake wheel, which requires a custom-made front axle due to different axle diameters (K: 25 mm, R: 17 mm) plus brackets for your brake calipers.

Aftermarket cast wheels are also possible if you decide to go for a rear disc brake, but here rim size is limited by your rear suspension unit (width of swingarm); I have heard spome specialists say that 4" is the maximum if you don not want to be affected by too much wheeel offset. However, I have have no personal experience with that since I prefer smaller rims which improve handling. I have one beemer with a 2.5 x 18 front wheel and a 3.00 x 17 rear wheel, the handling of which is superb.

@ John: I agree with you on the wheel issue; there is some magic beauty in a spoke wheel ...

If I find the time I will take some pics at the weekend and post them.

greetings, gentlemen!

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Old 05-15-2008, 04:51 PM   #28
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Alfons - thank you once again, because its easier to get a K triple tree (i have one or two options there) and SV650 forks should fit in as well - they are 41mm (and I have a set of SV650 clipon handlebars lying around..cheap!) and I could use any number of front wheel combos there, with minimal fuss.

With the rear wheel, Im thinking a K1100LT or K75S (later) 3 spoker - should fit with maybe a spacer? they are four bolt wheels too - and only 3 or 3.5in wide...

I agree with slimmer wheels all round, although I am not kidding myself that the R65S (As it will be called!) will be a screaming twister carving, I'd like to have a nice light bike for a change!

Again thanks - and await the pics with glee!

John - would you believe Im moving to Bunbury in January 2009? so we may be a bit closer by the time this project is truly underway!!!!

I was thinking of using a R75/5 headlight bucket speedo, but way too expensive. I might go for a little aftermarket analog speedo and matching tacho or something similar, still old school looking. The Vapor sounds interesting - might have a look.

When I get the bike stripped and any parts I dont need, give me a PM and we'll see what we can do - I already have a spare triple tree and I know I will have a spare swingarm, FD and rear wheel.

Pics soon
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Old 05-17-2008, 01:59 AM   #29
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Ok, update - I have bought a R75/5 1971 4speed box with kickstart and should be picking up a monolever swingarm soon too.

Looking at K-bike front ends now.

should be stripping the donor bike next weekend, I was working on my K1100R (yes, R, its a naked bike now) and fitting a single seat from an ex-police bike this weekend.

Wife wants one bike to go - i have 3 BMW's now. Got the cold stare when i said the R65 was going to be single seat as well!!! (although the K1100R will be converted back to two seat at the end of the year)
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Old 05-17-2008, 05:18 AM   #30
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Cafe racer BMW R65 BOXER

Description of a motorcyclist and his motorbike

Owner: Janis Perron
Occupation: Bicycle technician and Trucker
Passion: Motorcycle, bicycle and allmost everything with wheels
Preferences in books: Joe Barr Team albums

Motorcycle: Cafe Racer

BMW,R65 1984

Approximately 30 000km
When Janis isn't on his superb titanium bicycle, he is riding his motorcycle on the most winding roads he can find. As an experienced rider and tuner, he always obtains the maximum performance of his bike. His motorcycle friends equipped with more powerful bikes readily admit they have a hard time to keep up with him.
The motorcycle is the American version of a R65 imported used in Canada by a former customer. She bought the bike mainly to ride with her boy friend. After a crankshaft break down, we rebuilt the entire motor taking note of every step along the way (blue print method). Following this work, the results where excellent, the motor had gained power and smoothness. One year later, our client sold her bike to Janis Perron.
As soon as he bought it, Janis had the project to transform the R65 into a vintage cafe racer. We guided Janis through the technical aspects of this transformation. We suggested him to install one of our "Mikuni TM" 38mm carburettor kit to gain some power. Satisfied with this aspect of the performance, Janis also wanted to improve the road handling of the bike. The soft original suspension was replaced in both the front and the rear by one of our heavy duty, better suited "Progressive Suspension" kit. Janis and one of his friends built a fork brace and installed it to further more stabilise the front of the motorcycle. All the gadgets where stripped off, Janis replaced the front original wind deflector by a R90S type fairing. The instrument panel is now simple, only the essential gages remain. Clip-on bars and special head lamp brackets were installed. He replaced the original turn signal lights and the rear tail lamp by smaller fixtures. The original dual seat was replaced by a specially made leather solo seat reminiscent of the type used on the Matchless racers. To complete the vintage look and to add a bit more power, Janis chose to install a set of our "Conti replica" mufflers and what a nice sound!!
After trying the bike myself on a mountain road, I was impressed by the transformation. The handling is much better than on a standard model, it gives you the impression of being a better rider. The power is very good and easy to manage.
Future projects are numerous, since Janis installed racing type tires, he can lean the bike almost to the limit of scraping his pipes. He therefore wants to set them higher in a pattern similar to the old Ducati Imola racers. He will also install rear sets, reinforce the swingarm, fit wider R65LS wheels, complement the front brakes with a second disk. At last, upgrading the motor to sport-tune it seams more and more appealing.

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