ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Riding > The perfect line and other riding myths
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 09-25-2014, 05:02 PM   #1
VentureHighway OP
Adventurer
 
Joined: Aug 2014
Location: Southern Illinois
Oddometer: 15
Hitting Hidden Ruts

I started riding about a month ago, the bike being a DR350. I've been enjoying my local state part for this last week or so. Trying to ride a hour on off-road terrain every other day. I've laid the bike over 3 times each due to hitting a rut I didn't see. All of the ruts have been hidden by some foliage. I haven't had any problems riding in visible ruts, but when I hit them and don't see them I tend to lay the bike over. Any suggestions on what I can do to avoid laying the bike over and maintaining control?
__________________
"Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away."

Antoine de Saint-Exupery
VentureHighway is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2014, 05:09 PM   #2
Kommando
Grumpy Young Man
 
Kommando's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2006
Location: Spacecoaster FL
Oddometer: 6,837
Quote:
Originally Posted by VentureHighway View Post
I started riding about a month ago, the bike being a DR350. I've been enjoying my local state part for this last week or so. Trying to ride a hour on off-road terrain every other day. I've laid the bike over 3 times each due to hitting a rut I didn't see. All of the ruts have been hidden by some foliage. I haven't had any problems riding in visible ruts, but when I hit them and don't see them I tend to lay the bike over. Any suggestions on what I can do to avoid laying the bike over and maintaining control?
When in doubt, throttle out.

Try standing up in the "ready" position too. Let the bike move around under you. If you start to fall, gas it.
__________________
Some are guard dogs of the flock. Some herders, search/rescue, or companions. We Devildogs are those, and also retrievers. Hell is our blazing dogpark, our frigid swimming hole. The fallen are our tennis balls. We don't leave the fallen behind, even if the master has to bring them home for us. Semper Fi, my friends.
Kommando is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2014, 05:11 PM   #3
windypoint
Gnarly Adventurer
 
windypoint's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2012
Location: Walla Walla
Oddometer: 197
It's hard to say without more information, but I would hazard an opinion that you are not looking ahead far enough and processing your attack. I find looking at where you are wanting to be and appreciating the upcoming terrain will be a big help in getting through it. If you are focusing too close you cannot set yourself up for negotiating the terrain.
windypoint is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2014, 01:42 PM   #4
VentureHighway OP
Adventurer
 
Joined: Aug 2014
Location: Southern Illinois
Oddometer: 15
I have been keeping my eyes up. I have been lacking the standing up and gassing it when I'm starting to lose the bike. I'll be testing it on my next venture into the parks.
__________________
"Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away."

Antoine de Saint-Exupery
VentureHighway is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2014, 02:02 PM   #5
iyaoyas98
Bored Silly
 
iyaoyas98's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Location: Smyrna, TN
Oddometer: 6,138
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kommando View Post
When in doubt, throttle out.

Try standing up in the "ready" position too. Let the bike move around under you. If you start to fall, gas it.
iyaoyas98 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2014, 06:35 AM   #6
mongox
ARRRRGH!!!
 
mongox's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2002
Location: Gilroy,ca
Oddometer: 2,503
Do you have a good set of knobbies on your bike. A knobbie will get traction on the sides of a rut and ride over it where a road tire and even a not so aggressive dual sport tire, like a tourance will slide and tuck in a rut, especially if you do not unweight the front end. Dual sport bikes tend to be heavy in the front end as compared to a dirt bike and require more throttle to lighten the front end.
__________________
"First, God made idiots" Mark Twain

"Those who dance are considered insane by those who can't hear the music" unknown
mongox is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2014, 09:39 AM   #7
VentureHighway OP
Adventurer
 
Joined: Aug 2014
Location: Southern Illinois
Oddometer: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by mongox View Post
Do you have a good set of knobbies on your bike. A knobbie will get traction on the sides of a rut and ride over it where a road tire and even a not so aggressive dual sport tire, like a tourance will slide and tuck in a rut, especially if you do not unweight the front end. Dual sport bikes tend to be heavy in the front end as compared to a dirt bike and require more throttle to lighten the front end.
I put some new Kenda K270's on the bike that I put on the bike 700 miles ago.

I haven't taken the bike out to test the skills on the trails yet. Last time I rode I spilled it twice and knocked up my shins pretty rough. Think I may have a hairline fracture.
__________________
"Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away."

Antoine de Saint-Exupery
VentureHighway is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2014, 10:16 AM   #8
SAC650R
Adventurer
 
SAC650R's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2012
Oddometer: 26
Even if you can't tell it's coming and remain standing, you can make a habit of sitting further back, then gassing it gets the front light faster.
SAC650R is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2014, 10:34 AM   #9
foxtrapper
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: Sep 2011
Oddometer: 673
Quote:
Originally Posted by VentureHighway View Post
...but when I hit them and don't see them I tend to lay the bike over.
You're talking about ruts running roughly parallel to your travel, where the bike falls into a rut,right? In that case, I'd say you're not reacting quickly to where the bike actually is, and are trying to keep your body over where the bike was.

Basically, let your body follow the bike, while letting the bike dance and move under you.
foxtrapper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2014, 04:04 PM   #10
VentureHighway OP
Adventurer
 
Joined: Aug 2014
Location: Southern Illinois
Oddometer: 15
I have some good news. Well my shin isn't fractured, the bone is just bruised, got some MX boots in the mail, and my lower gear front sprocket. So I'll be taking the bike to the trail tomorrow.

It seems like there are some repeating trends in this thread. Not standing, not letting the bike move freely, and not using gas when these situations are arising. I'll be giving them a try tomorrow and am hoping for some "smoother" riding.
__________________
"Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away."

Antoine de Saint-Exupery
VentureHighway is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 09:50 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014