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Old 05-16-2015, 11:52 AM   #1
mosey.levy OP
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How often do you change brake pads ?

I've never done it but am hoping to do it myself. Saw a YouTube video on it and seems fairly simple.

A few questions.

How often do YOU change your pads?
Based on feel or scheduled ?

My F700GS is at 10.5k miles and the pads don't feel as tight as they used to. I commute daily in Manhattan so that could be a contributing factor.

Anything special I need to know besides just swapping out the pads?

Do you just use OEM pads or is there a better after market option?
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Old 05-16-2015, 12:49 PM   #2
Indy Unlimited
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Based on wear. Just look at them and once they are down to 1/8" of pad it is time to toss them. One side wears faster than the other but replace both as soon as one gets thin.
If they lost braking power flush and bleed your brakes with new DOT fluid. If you are still not happy try aftermarket pads.
I like EBC HH sintered pads.
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Old 05-16-2015, 03:31 PM   #3
Saltboxlad
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My 800GS has done 11,000 miles and the pads look as though they have loads of life left. Id be surprised if yours were that low unless you do off road too which tends to be heavy on them with the mud and grit getting in, but as has been said above you need to check them visually which you can do without removing anything

Some say to stick with OE pads as they are kinder on the discs, but on my last BMW I used Carbonne Lorraine Pads and the discs were still ok(Just) at 60,000 miles when I sold her. I personally wouldnt pay the silly money for OE pads.

PS: What I would do is take the calipers off and clean/grease the slider pins, a known weak point on sliding calipers, my rear one had started to seize at 5000 miles and I just caught it. You cant just use any grease though, it needs to be rubber friendly, normally either Red, or Brembos own which is white.
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Old 05-16-2015, 03:36 PM   #4
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Sometime simply pushing the piston back into the caliper can greatly improve brake feel as well.
(Of course, flushing and bleeding will accomplish the same thing if it's been a couple years since it's been done).
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Old 05-16-2015, 04:35 PM   #5
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I prefer antiseize on pins
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Old 05-16-2015, 08:35 PM   #6
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Just replaced my rear pads 69000 Km front were still okay.

I use anti seize on pins as well get it from work C 5A we use it on lot parts on the planes works well in areas exposed to water dirt etc
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Old 05-16-2015, 08:46 PM   #7
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When you do replace the pads be sure to check the fluid in the master cylinder first. If it is close to or at max, pushing the Pistons back into the calipers (to make room for the new, thicker pads) will push fluid back into the MC and you don't want it to overflow.

Really, if you're doing the pads, why not flush in new fluid as well?
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Old 05-17-2015, 05:45 PM   #8
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Lots of steep offroad with a pillion means I have gone through 5 sets of rear pads in 70,000km.

The rear disc is on the replacement limit.

There is one of my favourite spots for a Sunday afternoon picnic that has a 20 minute descent where you are trailing the rear brake most of the way down the "4x4 only" track. To give you an idea, a mate (who is capable off road, having done an African Dakar) on his 450 Sherco Rally prepped bike followed me down, and I waited about 10 minutes at the bottom for him. He'd completely lost brakes at about the half way mark trying to keep up. Mine were very hot, but still working.

I fitted a brake cooler to the rear caliper, and DOT 5.1 fluid. The disc will be too hot to touch and usually blue/purple in colour by the time I get to the river at the bottom, but I don't have the brakes fade to the point of not working now, like I had previously. I kept changing the rear brake fluid when it changed colour (overheated). It literally goes brown if it's been hot enough. I put my bled kit on it, crack the nipple, and pump the old fluid out, and the new fluid in. Takes a couple of minutes. The 5.1 with the cooler takes the heat much better. It will still discolour, but takes more rides to do so.

I've just fitted a softer compound rear pad, to buy some time before disc replacement.

Much greater bite. The first ride I did solo saw me over cook a corner in the dirt at about 120kph, and when I went to brake I locked the rear (the Rekluse can still catch me by surprise when solo). There's nothing quite like that feeling, sliding into a corner with the rear swinging in the breeze, and your brain telling your right foot to release, and it's just not playing the game.

I went to a single disc front end a while back, and I wore out the first set of front pads at about the 60,000km mark. The disc was also extremely loose on the floating pins. I took the pads out of the spare caliper and fitted them. At 70,000 they now look about half worn. Again, when I've doing steep work now, I alternate front and rear when trail braking on descents. I use as much front brake as I can, when I can, to give the rear a chance to cool down.

Standard gearing, the Rekluse, and having a pillion, dramatically increase brake wear for full off road work. Most steep descents have to be approached below the engagement speed for the clutch, just like idling down with the clutch held in. The weight with a pillion means that the engine just doesn't brake enough if you pick up speed, and you end up trailing the brakes the whole time. In some places, if you pick up speed there is almost zero chance of washing it off before the next downhill hairpin.

At times it's like riding a 2 wheeled truck down a steep mountain. You are focused totally on speed, and brake heat.
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Old 05-17-2015, 06:08 PM   #9
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To give an idea, in this moderate piece of fire trail (Dingi Dingi Trail, off Webbs Ridge Rire Trail in the Brindabellas) GPS/Google Earth track picture, riding between the black dots via the low ground marked with the green dot, solo, it's 1st gear engine braking and occasional use of the brakes. With a pillion, it's a rocky slow brake the whole way down.

When wet it's nearly impassable on anything but full knobbies, and even then you need to be very careful on a big bike with a lot of weight.



Just something to factor in for the guys that plan fully loaded off road trips.

The brake coolers make a big difference. Available from the KTM powerparts catalogue. I got mine at the local KTM dealer, off the shelf. They also help with pad life span. My last set of pads ran the whole life with the cooler, and they lasted the longest yet. I was considering trying to get a larger version with more cooling made. Or use 2 together. Removing the heat from the fluid helps cool the pads down.

Ultimately, for this kind of work, I'd like a larger rear disc. But the issues that arise from that desire mean it isn't financially viable. A bigger front is a lot easier proposition.
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Old 05-18-2015, 11:47 AM   #10
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I bought a new front set and tried to replace them last weekend. Fairly easy task. I was also based on the youtube video.
However, the front brake pads seem to have more life despite the 19.000kms...
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Old 05-18-2015, 12:07 PM   #11
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+1 to what everybody said (sick track, Snowy). Only adding because we have the same bike and almost same mileage. I'm heavy on rear brake and I had to replace my rears at about 11k miles. They were MUCH more worn than my fronts (those are still going strong). I just ordered EBC HH sintered from Amazon and threw them in - problem solved. As someone else said, I had flushed my fluid at some point so there was a bit too much in the reservoir to accommodate the new pads so I had to drop the level a hair.
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Old 05-18-2015, 02:21 PM   #12
mosey.levy OP
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I'll have to research flushing the system.

Regarding wear - I'm wondering if NYC commuting adds additional wear.
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Old 05-18-2015, 03:04 PM   #13
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aaaaahhh...but a relevant side track this time....well....same base subject...
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Old 05-18-2015, 11:36 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowy View Post
aaaaahhh...but a relevant side track this time....well....same base subject...
He said sick, not side. I believe thats younguns talk for good
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Old 05-19-2015, 02:10 AM   #15
Snowy
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I knew that.



No really.
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