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Old 04-04-2014, 02:06 PM   #1
vanislejay OP
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Spoked wheel repair (out of round)

Last summer I had a shop put new tires on my spoked rims. I didn't know at the time, but if this is not done properly it will throw the wheel out of round, which it did. Of course the shop claims they were like that before and won't repair them, although I doubt they would know how anyways.

The rim is still perfectly true, but it is out of round, I have verified this is the case, it's actually pretty bad so it's obvious when spinning the rim freely with the bike on the center stand.

I think what I will have to do is slack off all the spokes, and re-tighten them as if I was building the wheel from scratch, checking for roundness and true along the way. I understand the spoke tension spec is "if they ring when tapped they are tight enough".
Is that a decent summary?
Any other tips or tricks?

Thanks in advance.
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Old 04-04-2014, 04:19 PM   #2
MagyarMan
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How much out of round?
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Old 04-04-2014, 08:27 PM   #3
Wirespokes
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It's a little more than that. You'll also need to remove the tire and tube before touching the spokes.

But there's a mystery here - how can the wheel be perfectly true, and out of round at the same time? If the shop messed it up, it would have a wow - side to side deflection - which yours doesn't have from the description.

I've got a feeling the bead isn't totally seated. That can happen when the rim isn't cleaned of all the black goo remaining from the last several tires that lived there. It's sticky stuff and can prevent the bead from sliding all the way onto the rim. You can spot that by the molded in line that should be an equal distance from the edge of the rim all the way around.
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Old 04-05-2014, 06:20 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vanislejay View Post
Last summer I had a shop put new tires on my spoked rims. I didn't know at the time, but if this is not done properly it will throw the wheel out of round, which it did.

Thanks in advance.
I have never heard of a wheel going out of round by simply changing a tire. Wheel building is a job for a specialist or a dedicated enthusiast with knowledge of wheel building. I would carefully watch the tire and rim as you spin the wheel and make sure the tire is fully seated on the rim and that the radial run out is not from a defective tire or some such nonsense.
A bent wheel rim will not be repairable without replacement in my experience.
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Old 04-07-2014, 07:14 AM   #5
vanislejay OP
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It is definitely the wheel, when rotating it, you can see the rim edge move vertically with respect to the fork about 5-8mm, but it is still perfectly true. I have dial gauged it and seen it both directions. I also have built and repaired plenty of bicycle wheels, so I know the difference between a rim being out of round vs. true.

Who knows, maybe it had a few loose spokes from a previous owner's attempt at trueing.
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Old 04-07-2014, 07:17 AM   #6
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Send it to Woody's. http://www.woodyswheelworks.com/home.htm
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Old 04-07-2014, 08:51 PM   #7
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Did you check the run-out at the bead or the outer edge of the rim? The outer edge isn't necessarily all that even. Even the bead can have dips, like where the weld bead was ground down. Sometimes they went too far.

I really don't see how installing a tire could out-of-round a rim. I'll bet it was that way before the new tire.
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Old 04-08-2014, 06:16 AM   #8
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I replaced the stock Dunlop rims on my '71 T100 during my restoration with high quality aftermarket replacements several years ago. There was a noticeable flat spot where the rims were welded - this was quite common from what I was reading on the Britbike.com forum, at the time. It seemed that guys were sending these rims back for exchange to suppliers and requesting better quality units for their projects. I never bothered, even though it was visually noticeable when rotating the wheel in my wheel stand.

I did the build-up of my wheels with great results and when the rubber was installed, the dip/flat spots had no affect on the wheel performance. Due to the fact that the flat spots were induced by the manufacturing arbour, it was impossible to adjust these defects out.
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Old 04-08-2014, 08:04 AM   #9
vanislejay OP
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Apparently it is due to the way the hydraulic clamps grab the rim. It was smooth as silk before with the old tire, and now I can feel it when I ride. Maybe the old tire hid it somehow, but I doubt it.
At first I thought the tire wasn't seated or had a manufacturing defect, until I got down and really checked it out.

I'll pull everything and pull the tire off and check at the bead itself. I'd need to do that anyways before/during trueing it.

I'm also going to start looking for a local wheel builder. Anyone know one in Montreal?
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Old 04-08-2014, 08:09 PM   #10
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If the rim is truly bent, it will be difficult to make it right using just the spokes. I'd recommend straightening the rim while it's all together. Loosen the spokes where it needs to bump out, then force the rim back round.
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Old 04-09-2014, 01:38 PM   #11
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A bent rim needs to be straightened. Wire wheels need to be trued. Different operations for which Buchanan's charges different amounts. See:
http://www.buchananspokes.net/categories/labor.asp
And if your shop used a modern tire removal machine to remove a tire from a wire wheel - yeah, they might have bent the rim.
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Old 04-09-2014, 02:53 PM   #12
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Lacing wheels does require some rules to be followed but it's not rocket science but requires patience to "tune" it. Rule One: you must have good parts to work with. If your rim is egg shaped, there's no way you or anyone is going to make an oval rim round by cranking on the spokes. The rim either needs to be repaired or replaced "before" lacing it. If the rim is buggered, well it's buggered and needs to be replaced or repaired. Sorry don't have any cheap homebrew garage fixes. If you build with with junk parts, you built junk.
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Old 04-09-2014, 03:33 PM   #13
Beezer Josh
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Quote:
Originally Posted by usgser View Post
Lacing wheels does require some rules to be followed but it's not rocket science but requires patience to "tune" it. Rule One: you must have good parts to work with. If your rim is egg shaped, there's no way you or anyone is going to make an oval rim round by cranking on the spokes. The rim either needs to be repaired or replaced "before" lacing it. If the rim is buggered, well it's buggered and needs to be replaced or repaired. Sorry don't have any cheap homebrew garage fixes. If you build with with junk parts, you built junk.
Absolutely! I've relaced rims before and attempted to straighten bent rims. Myself and another guy bounced on a piece of timber set across the bent rim to try to straighten it once. Only got it marginally better, so he suggested we drive a car over it since we needed a lot more weight. At that point, I just threw in the towel and got a new rim.
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