ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > Beasts
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 05-20-2010, 09:28 PM   #1711
krampus
get lost
 
krampus's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2006
Location: NorCal
Oddometer: 541
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tama's Tigre
I have been in search for the replacement of my 06 Tiger. Not because I am dissatisfied with it, it's just that I have never owned a bike this long, and it's time to move on to new technology.

I have greatly anticipated the arrival of the 2010 Duc Multi, and I really thought this was going to be my next bike. Well, you know how some bikes photograph well, but are a let down in person, and visa versa. This bike is in the photogenic category. In the flesh, not a senorina bella. She just looked so cluttered, and plastic leading to nowhere, plastic and other assorted covers everywhere (I couldn't even see her beautiful motor), not the finish I was expecting, and that beak... instead of looking like a bird of prey, it looks like a stork.

Then for those long rides, you will want to replace that narrow windshield, upgrade to their cushier seat (the stock seat's cover doesn't even seat snugly against the foam), and purchase a GIVI topbox... all on top of $20k!

No doubt, the technogy and performance is there, but from Ducati (the sexiest motorscooters in the world), I expect a better package
In the first paragraph, you state that you're looking for technology. In the last paragraph, you state the technology is there in the new Multi.

If you are actually looking for different looks and a lower price in a bike that is packed with all the tech stuff, what bike are you leaning towards?

I ask this because I sell these bikes for a living and am always curious about what prospective buyers are looking for in today's market. In your opinion, what are other manufacturers doing right that Ducati is doing wrong? Fire away, no harm can be done...all I can do is learn from your response.

My only question to you, TT, is have you had a chance to ride the bike? If so, I'd be very interested in your critique...
__________________
Harrison, A&S BMW , DUCATI & TRIUMPH

"I am here to tell you that fast is better. I've always believed this, in spite of the trouble it's caused me."
H.S. Thompson
krampus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2010, 08:42 AM   #1712
Tama's Tigre
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Tama's Tigre's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Location: Austin, Texas
Oddometer: 495
Quote:
Originally Posted by 996DL
You raise the bar too high. Surely you didn't expect the 1200MS, to match or exceed an 06 Tiger ?

996DL
Blatant and dogmatic Ducati booster since 1977...
There you go again with your sarcasm. In real life, are you this adversarial? Of course I expected the 1200MS to exceed my relic Tiger (now see what you've done... I've pissed off all the Triple guys), and surely it does. You, and your buddies, go right ahead and buy the 2010. I'll be right behind you in 2011 after Ducati has taken some of our critiques into consideration, and polished this diamond in the rough into a real gem.

In the meantime, I'll kick back, drink beer, smoke cigars, and of course, ride my relic Tiger
Tama's Tigre is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2010, 09:15 AM   #1713
Tama's Tigre
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Tama's Tigre's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Location: Austin, Texas
Oddometer: 495
Quote:
Originally Posted by krampus
In the first paragraph, you state that you're looking for technology. In the last paragraph, you state the technology is there in the new Multi.

If you are actually looking for different looks and a lower price in a bike that is packed with all the tech stuff, what bike are you leaning towards?

I ask this because I sell these bikes for a living and am always curious about what prospective buyers are looking for in today's market. In your opinion, what are other manufacturers doing right that Ducati is doing wrong? Fire away, no harm can be done...all I can do is learn from your response.

My only question to you, TT, is have you had a chance to ride the bike? If so, I'd be very interested in your critique...
Krampus,

You've got your head in the right place. As stated in The World Futuist Society, today's consumers are increasingly demonstrating their desire and willingness to modify the products that they buy. They are no longer passive consumers, but becoming "prosumers" (producer-consumers). Forward looking companies, like Ducati (Triumph does not want to listen to us) have begun to embrace prosumers as sources of innovation that can be incorporated into new products.

I am not leaning toward any other bike as of now. As I was trying to tell 996DL, there is a beautiful bike trying to break out of that ugly duckling (the beak) body. Additionally, there's all kinds of contraptions and doodad covers, hiding the real soul of this bike. It's as if Ducati is just trying too hard. I wish we could sit down with Duc, in front of their CAD, and nip here & tuck there. Simplicity is key. Let form follow function. In this case, less may be more...

The assets I would not change is the technology and the performance... here Ducati has raised the bar
Tama's Tigre is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2010, 09:58 AM   #1714
996DL
Buell me
 
Joined: Aug 2006
Location: too far from the Rockies...
Oddometer: 2,093
Your remarks indicates a 2nd gen MS1200 is a possibility for yourself, or an owner/aftermarket modified effort. Expect a tidier wiring package for the optional heated handgrips and hopefully any hiccups addressed, in the very near future, nothing more. If the MS1200 would have pancaked upon it's release/introduction, you might have seen a hasty redesign, but people seem to be getting over the "beaky thing."

Your first posting was trolling for attention, it happened to get mine.

996DL
996DL is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2010, 10:13 AM   #1715
bross
Where we riding to?
 
bross's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2005
Location: Osoyoos, BC
Oddometer: 4,314
I'm with TT on one thing though, where's the motor? I'm one of the odd ones who actually liked the look of the old multi and one thing the old one has over the new one in spades is showing off that motor. It's just like the Buell Ulysses, for a naked bike you can't even see the motor. End of Rant and patiently waiting for my test ride.
bross is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2010, 12:06 PM   #1716
ganze
apocalyptic defender
 
ganze's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2008
Location: texas
Oddometer: 436
The looks of the ms1200 have grown on me. And I think it's turning out to be a real game changer in the adv-ish motorcycle market. But what I expect to be unbelievably sexy will be the hypermotard based on this bike.

give it a year or so and let's see.
__________________
Supermoto bikes exist so that 40 year old men who know better can act like total assholes.
ganze is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2010, 01:37 PM   #1717
Chadx
Off the road again..
 
Chadx's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2007
Location: Bozeman, Montana
Oddometer: 2,161
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tama's Tigre
Oh, so, no constructive criticism, or descent allowed here? Make note ADV Riders... only dogmatic Ducati adorers allowed
Don't overreact. I think 996 was being serious with the "next in line" comment. A lot of people like the bikes and are fine if you don't because it will move them up on the list. Everyone likes different things and most of us on here are cool with that (although the ass-waggy icon at the end of your first post was a bit much. Don't poke people if you can't take getting poked back).

By the way, prosumer does not mean "producer-consumers". In common useage, that term describes a product that falls between a professional level product (feature sets, pricepoints, etc.) and a consumer level product.

Now, back to the bike...
I don't think we will see a redesign of the body work anytime soon. Most seem to like it. Every bike (car, house, etc.) can't possibly appeal to everyone and someone will always think a product is ugly. That's why there is such a nice wide variety of products to choose from; bikes included. Others will love the looks, but dislike some functional aspects, and for those, that may be a deal breaker. Some things won't be perfect, but one can live with. So it comes down to fit and finish. Not on the bike itself, but fit and finish of the potential owner combined with the bike. For me, the MS is "on the list". Not quite at the top, but pretty close.

Chadx screwed with this post 05-21-2010 at 01:50 PM
Chadx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2010, 11:05 PM   #1718
Curvesurfer
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Nov 2005
Location: SF Bay area, CA
Oddometer: 356
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tama's Tigre
She just looked so cluttered, and plastic leading to nowhere, plastic and other assorted covers everywhere... not the finish I was expecting, and that beak... instead of looking like a bird of prey, it looks like a stork.

Then for those long rides, you will want to replace that narrow windshield, upgrade to their cushier seat (the stock seat's cover doesn't even seat snugly against the foam), and purchase a GIVI topbox... all on top of $20k!
This sounds exactly like the description of a BMW GS...

...but the Ducati has Ohlins suspension, 40 more HP, and a sportier disposition.
__________________
'14 R1200GS LC
'10 Multistrada S
'08 Brutale 910S
'95 900SS SP
Curvesurfer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2010, 08:13 AM   #1719
canadianstrom
Gnarly Adventurer
 
canadianstrom's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2005
Location: ontario, Canada
Oddometer: 153
seat cover?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tama's Tigre
Then for those long rides, ..... upgrade to their cushier seat (the stock seat's cover doesn't even seat snugly against the foam),



my understanding that a a seat cover stretched taunt over the foam only decreases comfort. My thinking is Ducati made it that way for a good reason, even though some people get hung up on the looks.
__________________
bydajesuskrise!- local hillbilly

2003 Suzuki VStrom 1000
2009 Beta Evo 200
2011 GasGas EC300
canadianstrom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2010, 12:13 PM   #1720
switchback
Eatin' Dirt Since 1982
 
switchback's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2002
Location: SLC, UT
Oddometer: 1,484
Went and looked at a MTS 1200 yesterday. Nice bike but near $24k OTD for a touring model Anyway, despite all the technology I was drawn away to the new Hypermotard EVO. I swear that that bike made me tingle. Not that there are many changes but the details they changed make the bike look awesome. If it had a 5 gallon capacity it might have gone in the garage.

As for the strada the fairing went from something like no other and an acquired taste (plain ugly to some but unique) to something that is way overdone. Little bit GS, little Yamaha FZ6 little bit sport scooter, and add some nostrils. To each their own but I think I like the pictures better than in person.
__________________
David

Wind is strong and cold
Rain blurs the winding road ahead
I live on two wheels
switchback is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2010, 12:40 PM   #1721
BikePilot
Beastly Adventurer
 
BikePilot's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2005
Location: Tampa
Oddometer: 11,174
You can buy a 6gal aftermarket tank for the hyper. I'm not crazy about the design (you loose the airbox), but it makes a super fun, but generally useless bike useful so that's something:)

On a different note, a friend from the TL forum went to the unveiling of the Pikes Peak racebikes and nabbed some pics
http://www.tlzone.net/forums/open-fo...ed-ducati.html
__________________
'09 Buell XB12XT, TL1000S, H1F, M620, CR250R, KX100, XR650R, Cota 315R

Summer 2009 Ride Report http://advrider.com/forums/showthrea...1509c&t=507038
Summer 2008 RR. http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=367703
BikePilot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2010, 01:07 PM   #1722
switchback
Eatin' Dirt Since 1982
 
switchback's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2002
Location: SLC, UT
Oddometer: 1,484
Quote:
Originally Posted by BikePilot
You can buy a 6gal aftermarket tank for the hyper. I'm not crazy about the design (you loose the airbox), but it makes a super fun, but generally useless bike useful so that's something:)
I saw the tank for the old model. Wasn't sure if it fit the EVO as well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BikePilot
On a different note, a friend from the TL forum went to the unveiling of the Pikes Peak racebikes and nabbed some pics
http://www.tlzone.net/forums/open-fo...ed-ducati.html
Thanks for sharing. Bikes look better stripped.
__________________
David

Wind is strong and cold
Rain blurs the winding road ahead
I live on two wheels
switchback is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2010, 03:23 PM   #1723
Horizon
Swedish Surströmming!
 
Joined: Mar 2008
Location: Northern Sweden
Oddometer: 27
Drove a Multistrada 100 miles yesterday and yes it had lots of power and the Öhlins suspension was awsome. But the engine behaved like it was badly out of sync.
It surged a lot when you just cruised along, like an engine with every sensor adjusted way off.

I could make my V-strom run that rough, but then i would have to adjust the TPS way off, and syncronise the trottle bodies like a 4-year old would have done...

I told the Ducati technician about this, but he just shook his head and said that there is nothing more he can do. Everything is adjusted as it should be.
He said that you just have to drive very aggressively, then you wouldn´t feel the surging...

Eeeh... a bike that costs a fortune, and can´t be driven at a steady speed in a civilized manner..?

I think i´ll stay with my Vee for another year or two.
Horizon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2010, 03:46 PM   #1724
Dr. Greg
Tryin' to get home..
 
Dr. Greg's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2005
Location: ABQ, New Mexico
Oddometer: 1,104
My "ultimate" Multistrada 1200S test ride

NOTE: This is more like a "trip report"...kinda long. I just felt some folks might be interested. Probably "short and sweet" is better, but I had some time on my hands this afternoon.


1. Looking for a New Bike

At age 62 (over 50 years of riding experience; both pavement and dirt), I figured that it would be fitting to have just ONE MORE new bike to carry me to the grave (not anytime soon, y'unnerstand). I actually thought I had it with the (please don't laugh) '06 Buell Ulysses, on which I've put a combined 80,000 miles (actually two '06s; first one totalled on a deer). The Uly is far more capable than most think, and I was one of those fortunate few who really click with the bike.

With the demise of Buell, however, I started thinking about the NEXT BIKE. Had to be in the "adventure" mold, of course. Tried a GS...

...but it was TOO DA@N BIG!! Plus Mrs. Greg hated it (not as a passenger; just looking at the thing). Finally, I just couldn't see myself as part of the BMW crowd. Sorry.

Then a few weeks ago I went as far as sitting on a KTM 990 (sorry for the iPhone picture quality)...

...nice riding position, etc. But never got around to taking a test ride. Almost went up to Durango, CO to look at an '08 KTM 990 ADV, but didn't.

Of course I've been following the Ducati MTS 1200 for months. I own a '92 Ducati 900SS, and it---along with the Uly---has been the most satisfying bike I've ever owned. Put 41,000 miles on it, right up until it blew a (ball) main bearing. I did a complete rebuild, easy to wrench on. Gotta check out this Multistrada 1200.


2. PJ and my proposed test ride route

Our local Ducati dealer is "PJ's Triumph/Ducati/Husqvarna" (Albuquerque, New Mexico), and they were having the "grand unveiling" of the MTS1200 last Friday evening. Mrs. Greg and I attended, but too many people clustering around the MTS1200 to get good pics.

I asked PJ (owner) about maybe taking a longer test ride during a weekday; he said sure. So I agreed to come in at 10:00 Wednesday. I awoke early (understandably) and thought to myself, "boy, I know the PERFECT route to take for the Multi...but no way will PJ let me do it." Of course the answer is always "NO" till you ask, right?

So I showed up shortly after 10:00 and the white MTS 1200S Sport was sitting out front, ready to go. I did some paperwork, then said to PJ, "y'know, for ME the ultimate test route would be to ride down I-40 to my home and show my family, then up I-25 to Placitas and turn east up NM 165 (10 miles of dirt road from 6,500 to 9,000 feet up the north side of the Sandia Mountains), then on down the "Crest Road" (the local "racer road," 10 miles of stunning curves; 30 mph hairpins to 80 mph sweepers). "If I were you," I told PJ, "I'd say NO, but I had to ask." This route is exactly 66.9 miles total.

He thought a second, then said "you'd be gone about two hours, right?" And that meant YES! Woo-hoo! Must have been the gray hair, my Univ. of New Mexico Dept. of Mechanical Engineering business card that says "Director of Graduate Programs," or a temporary loss of sanity by PJ. BTW, the local BMW salesman (the late, great, GSDude) would NOT let me take the GS demo bike on that test route. Humph. Kudos to PJ! (pic below)


Got a tutorial on the MTS1200, but all I really needed to know was how to switch modes. Fired up the Testastretta 11,

and headed out to the I-40 on-ramp. It was a little louder than I thought, but as I got moving it was fine. "Boy, this thing is comfy!" I'm 5-9, (32 inseam) and it seemed to fit me perfectly. Very nice clutch action, and the transmission---while a little "looser" than my "snick-snick" 2000 Aprilia Mille gearbox---worked just fine.


3. I-40 to my house...

The Multi carved a tight line around the on-ramp as I got on I-40 westbound down towards the Rio Grande valley (and my house). The wind protection seemed a little worse than the Uly (on which I have a Laminar Lip); I'll bet cutting down the 'screen then installing a Laminar Lip would clean it right up. I prefer clean air to big 'screens and buffeting. Sliced through the trucks and got some clear road in front of me, so I rolled it on a little. MY GOSH but that 1198 does the business! In the lower gears it would be terrifying (to me, at least). Well, as my 90-year old former test-pilot neighbor Bruce says, "too much power is almost enough." The MTS1200 has enough. BTW, this was all in TOURING mode. The 1198 was plenty smooth, and I said to myself "boy, I could do some miles on this thing..." Suspension was a little taut (I'm 140 lb) but it's probably set for a 240-lb rider or so...typical American (no offense). Reading the previous post about surging; I felt none of that whatsoever.

As I exited I-40, I switched into URBAN mode (mode-switching on the run is a breeze). Pulled into my garage, and turned the Multi around; plenty of steering lock, and its RELATIVELY small size made this a breeze. The GS I rode was a BEAST in terms of maneuvering it around inside. What a difference! Pushed it out onto my driveway to get a couple pics...


My 17-year old son Jeff (the youngest of my four boys) liked it...

...more importantly, Mrs. Greg REALLY liked it (she's just out of the picture).

Nothin' but the best...


Regarding appearance, this is subjective. Like food. Foods aren't good are bad; it's whether YOU like them or not. I like the look of the MTS1200, but I can certainly understand those who do not. Some have complained the engine is not visible...I think it's about as visible as it could be. Liquid-cooled engines (IMHO) don't have the "look" of air-cooled, anyway. The MTS1200 mill is certainly more visible than, say, a KTM 990, but certainly not a 1200 GS. Anyway, it has enough "mechanical presence" to satisfy me.


4. I-25 north to Placitas and the dirt...

Got my helmet back on and was all ready to leave the house, but...I can't turn the blasted ignition on! I tried everything, finally pushing the rubber-covered "button" where the ignition switch usually is, and that did it. Whew! The low fuel warning light was on, so I stopped at the gas station before hitting I-25. Filled 'er up---had to get the key out to open the filler cap. Hey, a fuel gauge! Believer it or not, I've never owned a bike with a fuel gauge before. And it went right to the top, FULL (isn't it true that GS gauges sometimes don't go all way to FULL?).

Back into TOURING mode and north we went. As usual this spring in New Mexico, it was very windy. Plus there was road construction all the way to my exit (15 miles) with lots of traffic and 55 mph speed limit. Humph. But we made it.


5. Ten miles of varied dirt road from 6,500 to 9,000 feet!

After passing through the "village" of Placitas, we got to the dirt.


This road is very good on the lower stretches, but the upper portion has some rougher spots (weather-induced). Lots of ruts, some rocky sections, etc. A carefully-driven automobile can make it, however.

Surely you can see how excited I am!


Oops, gotta make sure and select the proper MODE...


I rode up the lower stretches in second gear, 3-4,000 rpm (25-35 mph). My first thought was "the Multi feels right at home here!" And it did! It felt VERY stable and planted on the dirt. Obviously I wasn't pushing very hard, but I would have ABSOLUTELY no qualms about tackling just about any fair-quality (or better) hardpack 2-track on the Multi. Up on the pegs, the position was perfect (for me at 5-9). It really felt at home, and THAT was a unexpected revelation to me. COOL! I often take camping trips back a ways on forest roads, and the Multi would be very comfortable doing that. I LIKE this bike.

About halfway up the road I stopped at a picturesque spot to take a photo (gotta make this test ride report interesting); I put my feet down, pulled the camera out of my pocket and started framing the pic. Hadn't thought about the fact that I was on a slight uphill slope. As I got ready to push the button, the Multi started to slowly roll backward. I should have thrown the camera away and grabbed the brake. But I tried to put the camera in my pocket, then grab the brake. Too late!



OH. MY. GOD. I just dropped a $20,000 bike on a test ride!! The only one in the state!! This is my WORST NIGHTMARE!! Unbelievable. I'm an idiot.

Naturally, I was PANICKED. Although I do know how to pick up a dropped bike, the trees at the side of the road interfered, and while (awkwardly) lifting, my lower back went POP! End of lifting. There's a picnic area a little ways up the road, and some kids were playing across the creek (no bridge). I yelled to them, and they sent their dad down the road to help me. We got the Multi back up quite easily...


I checked for damage, fearing the worst. Amazingly, the ONLY damage was (1) the right mirror loosened, and (2) the right plastic handguard/turn signal snapped where it slips over a boss on the brake perch. Luckily it snapped such that the wind pressure would tend to CLOSE the break. That was it. No damage to any bodywork, rear turn signals, nothing. Whew!

The Testastretta 11 started immediately, and I set off again, considerably ruffled in spirit, but determined to finish my test ride in style. As the road got rougher the MTS1200 went right through it with nary a hiccup. That engine is TRULY AMAZING! It's happy putting along in first gear (which is low enough to ride at fairly slow speed; in fact the gear ratios are perfect, IMHO), but when you "give it the beans" better have some clear road ahead. Unbelievable.

I did have the presence of mind to stop near the top for a picture looking north...pretty bike (IMHO), pretty scenery. Elevation near 9,000 feet.



6. Down the "Crest Road"

Shortly after taking the above photo I came to the paved "Crest Road," actually NM 536, which goes up the east side of the Sandia Mountains, reaching Sandia Peak at 10,678 feet. I joined NM 536 just above the Ski Area, and would descend it. Probably about ten miles. This road is a sportbike paradise. Time to click 'er into SPORT mode!

Fellas, I was understandably a little restrained due to my recent incident, but lemme tell ya, riding the Multi down this road was like riding a LASER BEAM. Absolutely neutral, absolutely stable, glued to the road. Very responsive, yet unbelievably confidence-inspiring (which I needed badly). And comfortable. I have never, ever, ridden a motorcycle that behaved quite like that. And this just after I rode up ten miles of dirt road in complete control (well, almost). Oh yeah, the brakes are excellent (even though I wasn't exactly braking deep into corners)

Anyway, down to I-40 and back to PJ's. I tried to think of what to say as I pulled in and revealed the fact that I just crashed (OK, dropped) their one and only Ducati Multistrada 1200. I actually forget what I said, but they were very cool about it, and PJ was more concerned about my back.

So thus ended my "ultimate" test ride.


7. Epilogue

They worked up a repair estimate; it came out to $400. Not bad. Some of the stuff that wasn't broken was scratched up, and they understandably wanted to replace it. But that figures out to about $6/mile. It was well worth it. Went to the doctor the next day; she said the POP was like when you crack your knuckles. My lower back is still VERY sore, but I should recover.

And I now---at Mrs. Greg's urging---have a deposit on a RED 2010 Ducati Multistrada 1200S Touring. Most amazing bike I've ever ridden...

--Doc
__________________
2013 BMW GSW
2000 Kawasaki KLX300R
1992 Ducati 900SS
1991 Honda Hawk NT650 (commuter)
Dr. Greg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2010, 04:38 PM   #1725
bross
Where we riding to?
 
bross's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2005
Location: Osoyoos, BC
Oddometer: 4,314
Nice write-up, thanks doc. Couldn't you work a deal on your "demo" bike.
bross is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 09:05 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014