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Old 08-11-2009, 06:07 AM   #211
Motoriley
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Quote:
Originally Posted by svejkovat
snip - I disconnected the cable at the other end and attached a variable speed drill. Bringing the speed up to about ten miles an hour I went back at the needle with the magnifying glass. With extreme care, aiming my white hot little bead, keeping it moving so that it didn't burn, I was finally able to massage the curve of the needle back to nearly original without having to remove the lens!

That one felt pretty cool.
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Old 08-11-2009, 02:45 PM   #212
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Quote:
Originally Posted by svejkovat
With extreme care, aiming my white hot little bead, keeping it moving so that it didn't burn, I was finally able to massage the curve of the needle back to nearly original without having to remove the lens!

That one felt pretty cool.
I always wondered if there could be another use for the skills learned while earning my Boy Scout fire starting merit badge - I guess you proved it pays to "Be Prepared". Now let's see if someone can find a good Mcgyver application (other than navigation) for a compass.
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Old 08-11-2009, 07:39 PM   #213
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BluePill
Now let's see if someone can find a good Mcgyver application (other than navigation) for a compass.
Astronomical observation.

Directing artillery

Mining

Building orientation

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Old 08-12-2009, 12:52 PM   #214
svejkovat
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I used a hall effect sensor to build an auto trigger (start the water cooling) for my TIG welding setup. Wanted to trigger the autoshade helmet with it but my ambition ran out. But while researching the sensors back then I learned that any wire that is carrying current (under load) will emit a 'hall' effect of magnetic waves rippling out axially from the wire. They are usually extremely weak, but modern hall sensors (and some new hybrids) that are being developed for gps and digital navigation are extremely sensitive. You mentioned another use for a compass. I went online to see if the hall effect of household wiring was sufficient to use a compass to find it. What the hall effect tells you is not if it's a 240v line, but whether 240v is actually going through it at the moment (being used by something at the other end). But the traditional (scout) compass is too weak, and wiring is usually behind too much space (distance from the sensor) to register. BUT, here comes the macgyver stuff....

Digital compasses can be 'hacked' to adjust the sensitivity on the board and might actually be able to detect household current in the wires behind walls (or whether the evildoer somewhere in the house is actually drawing current through it right at that moment!). And while I was looking up this stuff, turns out you can use a compass to detect magnets (bombs or surveillance devices) attached to the bottom of your car (motorcycle?). 99 times in a hundred your dinner date is going to be more certain that you are a paranoid schizophrenic than that you are a super cool macgyver, so use this informtion with some discression.

svejkovat screwed with this post 08-12-2009 at 01:03 PM
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Old 08-12-2009, 02:41 PM   #215
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Quote:
Originally Posted by svejkovat
99 times in a hundred your dinner date is going to be more certain that you are a paranoid schizophrenic than that you are a super cool macgyver, so use this informtion with some discression.
You could have her start the car for you instead.

How many MacGuyvers do I get?
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Old 08-19-2009, 05:45 AM   #216
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[quote=Bigsteve]My hydraulic clutch failed on a 73 Triumph Spitfire I had. ............... I had barely enough fluid on hand to wet the bottom of the fuid cup so really could not bleed the thing. quote]

Water will work just fine. Coolant out of the radiator is better still, but must be flushed out at the first opportunity.
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Old 08-19-2009, 07:40 AM   #217
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I was young and stupid then - now I'm older.

I was prepping my Zook RM250 for the races. I had the exhaust, airbox, tank, side covers, and wheels off the bike, which was propped up on a box. I had removed the carb slide and stuffed a rag in the opening. I was checking the timing (I think) when all hell broke loose - the fucking thing started! - and revved to the limit. First off, there was this deafening roar of the engine, then the air filled with cotton wool (it ingested the rag), and of course it jumped off the box while I was scrambling to find the kill switch.
As they say - three things you need - air, fuel (in the bowl) and spark (no ignition switch). Not my finest McGyver moment.
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Old 08-20-2009, 11:34 AM   #218
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Dunno where I saw it, but if you really need a good firestarter, and you don't want to waste good bike fuel to do it..... Pringles. Yep, it's oil suspended in cellulose, and in a shape guaranteed to burn long and hot.
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Old 08-20-2009, 12:53 PM   #219
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Quote:
Originally Posted by librarian
Dunno where I saw it, but if you really need a good firestarter, and you don't want to waste good bike fuel to do it..... Pringles. Yep, it's oil suspended in cellulose, and in a shape guaranteed to burn long and hot.
Or Cheetos. From http://blackpacker.gnn.tv/blogs/1071..._Camping_101_9
Cheetos: The ubiquitous solid fuel tablet
Sold as Cheetos Puffs or a thousand other off-brands, the unique chemical makeup of preservatives, oil and chemical cheese powder make cheese puff snacks an excellent improvised fuel source, producing a bright, long lasting flame and ten poofs can boil a beer can full of water. They can be burned in any empty can or a small wood stove and reduce to dust and a suspicious looking residue on the bottom of your pan. Probably carcinogenic, I would suspect Cheetos to be the most poisonous of camp fuels. If you should accidentally ingest one, contact a ranger station immediately. Im not joking, try burning cheesy poofs. It has to be the pofy kind, the mini cheese walking ticks wont cut it. @5500 BTU/Lb
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Old 08-20-2009, 07:17 PM   #220
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I like Fritos for this. Never seen a potato stove.
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Old 08-21-2009, 09:53 PM   #221
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When I put CRF150R forks on my CRF230L the speedometer cable did not fit. I did not like the looks of not having something there I used a plastic wheel off of an office chair (keep the wheels when get a new chair, just never know) It looks like it belongs and no one would be the wiser. Best part it was free and I did not have to order parts and wait. This cover also covers a spacer I made which works perfectly but does not look perfect.
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Old 08-26-2009, 12:10 PM   #222
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Dairy Queen Thermodynamics

Not all MacGyver moments are mechanical.

Ridng an '84 Sportster from near Houston home to the Big Bend I encountered a cold front with rain and about 42F temps.

I was wearing jeans, long sleeve shirt, and a jean jacket, with a full face helmet. Not exactly adequate, and I didn't have a rain suit.

Pulling into a DQ at Sonora to warm up, I had a thought. I scrounged a few old newspapers laying around and asked the gal behind the counter if I could have two trash bags. She was happy to oblige once I revealed my plan.

Going into the men's room I stripped off my jacket, shirt, and dropped my pants. Then as I was putting things back on I layered about ten pages of newspaper against the skin facing into the wind, and put a trash bag layer between the paper and my pants. Up top paper in front and trash bag with holes for head and arms over all and under the shirt.

This provided insulation and a water/wind-proof layer that kept me very comfy for the several hours I still had to ride.

Shortly after that I traded the Sporty for a new 86 K75C with bags to carry all the gear I might need.
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Old 09-12-2009, 01:30 PM   #223
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You shoulda kept the sporty - you KNOW it'll run in the rain. (Even if that wet spark plug lead shocks the heck out of your thigh!)

My worst moment was hitting a hailstorm in Northern California - all I had was a tanktop and shitty sunglasses. (This is the pre-helmet days, BTW). Try riding when something is throwing gravel at you nonstop. OUCH!!!

(second worst was learning how to "rope" tires on the fly (never did it before) because it snowed the night before on a bike run, I was cold as hell (w/ no "body warmer") and I wanted to get HOME!!! 215 miles from slip to slush to rainstorm... BLEAH!)

Anyway, put my closed left fist in front of my nose (no joke), and it diverted it off my eyes - think it has to do with the wind... prolly saved my silly butt...

Ya know, I wish I'd thought of heftys and newspaper - I did do baggies around sox in boots which kept my feet almost dry but not frozen.

bbs
Quote:
Originally Posted by MotoTex
Not all MacGyver moments are mechanical.

Ridng an '84 Sportster from near Houston home to the Big Bend I encountered a cold front with rain and about 42F temps.

I was wearing jeans, long sleeve shirt, and a jean jacket, with a full face helmet. Not exactly adequate, and I didn't have a rain suit.

Pulling into a DQ at Sonora to warm up, I had a thought. I scrounged a few old newspapers laying around and asked the gal behind the counter if I could have two trash bags. She was happy to oblige once I revealed my plan.

Going into the men's room I stripped off my jacket, shirt, and dropped my pants. Then as I was putting things back on I layered about ten pages of newspaper against the skin facing into the wind, and put a trash bag layer between the paper and my pants. Up top paper in front and trash bag with holes for head and arms over all and under the shirt.

This provided insulation and a water/wind-proof layer that kept me very comfy for the several hours I still had to ride.

Shortly after that I traded the Sporty for a new 86 K75C with bags to carry all the gear I might need.
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Old 09-13-2009, 06:14 PM   #224
eyedragaknee
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Mcguyver tire fix

Tube shredded, all out of spares. Fill tire with dirt and got out of the woods(7 miles) and out to the main road.
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Old 09-13-2009, 10:03 PM   #225
Skippii
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eyedragaknee
Tube shredded, all out of spares. Fill tire with dirt and got out of the woods(7 miles) and out to the main road.
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