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Old 03-21-2012, 04:34 PM   #13021
WeeBee
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Joined: Apr 2006
Location: Windsor, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2bold2getold View Post
While I've got it apart I'm doing a mod on the front upper Givi engine guard mount. At some point the u-bolts on the stock mounts dinged my front fender, during a bottom out of the forks, I guess. This mod will cure that problem.
Any chance you could post some details including pics as to this mod? I have the same issue on hard bumps.
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Old 03-21-2012, 05:46 PM   #13022
2bold2getold
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Location: DFW TX
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Sure, gotta get me a photo share account. Thanks Baldy. No really I understand the need for it. I guess most are using SmugMug...any others? The mod is pretty simple. Remove the stock clamps. Bend the tubing up and rear a little. I wedged mine in a handy willow tree and put a cheater bar on it. Weld a short 2 1/2" piece of flat stock(1"X1/8" should work) on the end of the tube so it lays above the radaitor mounting boss and flat against the side of the frame. I realize some don't have a welder, but with some careful measurements, you should be able to get a friend or shop to do it for not much. Any body lives near DFW, I'll do it for ya. This is what I call fun!!! Drill a hole through the frame above the upper radiator mounting bosses and weld a spacer(probably not needed) in the frame. Drill matching mounting holes in the flat stock and run a bolt through the whole works to secure. I've got it about finished. I"ll try to post pics soon(tomorrow). Royce
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Old 03-22-2012, 03:29 PM   #13023
2bold2getold
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Joined: Dec 2011
Location: DFW TX
Oddometer: 1,300
Laugh Givi Engine Guard Mod

First, here's the problem...

Remove the stock clamp...
Then see where things line up. mine were bent already.

Next, bend the ends of the tubes up and back for better clearance, and mark the place to drill the frame for the mounting bolt..

Then, mark the position for the flat stock, detailed in post #13022, and weld it to the tubes.

Fit the bars to the bike and mark the places to drill the holes in the brackets and the frame. When you're confident with the positioning, drill the holes. Cut a spacer to weld through the frame, this may not be needed, the frame is a good 1/8" thick in this spot. Maybe use some sealer when you mount the bars to keep water out.

Spacer and bolt.

Welded spacer.

Install new mount and bolt everything together.

From the front. This will give more clearance. No u-bolts to hit fender, and bars moved up and back a little.

2bold2getold screwed with this post 03-25-2012 at 08:42 PM
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Old 03-25-2012, 05:15 PM   #13024
danoromero
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Joined: Oct 2011
Location: Guanajuato Mexico
Oddometer: 5
Wicked Transalp 90

I have some time trying to post pics from my transalp, finally.....




my mods are:
- windshield (DIY)
- front wheel spokes
- front tire (metzeler enduro 3)
- rear brake shoes
- rear shock spring (used from my other '97 transalp)
- battery (maintainance free)
- k&n air filter
- complete new used engine (the old one broke, connecting rod)
- front sproket (used from my other '97 transalp)
- solenoid
- stainless steel front brake hose
- front brake master cylinder
- mirrors (honda oem)
- givi handlebar grips
- rear turn lights
- headlight philips motorcycle h4
- cdi holder
- silver paint job

I posted my sad story on december, Freakdaddy (adv rider inmate) offered me his engine, it's in really good shape low mileage, as soon as i placed it the engine started, then i fixed on the used sproket from my other transalp, it is running smoothly, yesterday changed the mixed water with antifreeze from the old engine and place new antifreeze, give it a ride and perfect, then i let the bike sit the hole night then this morning i noticed a gas leak from the left side carburetor, tried to start the engine and it couldn't move it was literaly stuck.......... panic.......more panic (this happened the last time the engine broke), then fortunately i was in a friend's house with a big garage and all the necessary tools...... he told me to remove a spark plug to see how was it, as soon as I unscrew it started to poor out a lot of gas......the cylinder was filled with the gasoline coming from the carburetor, the other cylinder was dry, then i looked the oil pan, it was up to the top with a mix of oil and gasoline............. nothing happend this time, changed the oil and filter, take the gasoline out of the cylinder and after that i took it for a ride just 100 miles it is perfect......Lesson learned .......the last time happend the same, the oil pan was so full that the gas was degrading my oil it was just matter of hours, days or miles to be fatal.....the result was a connecting rod and a big hole in the pan.

i'm going to overhaul my carburetors, the left one is spilling the gas, maybe the floater is not working right.... so

if your engine stucks don't do nothing remove a spark plug, check the oil......

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Old 03-26-2012, 12:54 AM   #13025
gkam
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Joined: Feb 2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rwjr14 View Post
I took a 03 superhawk and converted it to an XRV1000
added multistrada front end with ducati gt hubs and excel rims front and rear
tins are off a FJR1300 along with the saddle and tail piece (has a nice turn signal tailight combo)
purchased a fairing out of italy for a transalp and added lights from a fzr600
i get about 250 miles to a tank, put a few 600 mile days on it seems to be a real comfortable bike that handles quite well and doesn't mind a little gravel mixed in there

if i can figure out how to post some pics i'll add some

Ooooh yes, post some pics please!
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Old 03-26-2012, 02:36 AM   #13026
potski
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Joined: Sep 2007
Location: In the mountains
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2bold2getold View Post
Sure, gotta get me a photo share account. Thanks Baldy. No really I understand the need for it. I guess most are using SmugMug...any others?
Hi 2bold2getold,

I use Flickr which seems to work OK.

Cheers
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Old 03-26-2012, 06:39 AM   #13027
2bold2getold
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Joined: Dec 2011
Location: DFW TX
Oddometer: 1,300
Thanks potski, I used SmugMug. Important to support the local economy. It is pretty straight forward. I'll check out Flickr for other needs. The bad thing is two or three or four years from know when some one else goes back to research these bikes, a lot of these pictures will be gone. Thats the case already. I just finished reading this entire thread and a lot of the pics have been deleted or dropped. What I learned is that you guys are very generous with your knowledge and have a lot of patience with new owners of these recycled bikes with the same old problems. Thanks to everyone.
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Old 03-26-2012, 02:40 PM   #13028
ChrisUK
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Joined: Dec 2004
Location: God's Own County
Oddometer: 577
1988 PD06 Transalp carb jetting for altitude?

Hi guys


Sorry for the seemingly odd question: This summer Im riding my 88 Trannie in Central Asia. In places like Tajikistan/ Kyrgyzstan I could be up at 4000m/16000 feet above sea level. Has anyone ridden at altitude and adjusted/changed their carb jets? Currently the bike has standard jetting as it came out of the factory. Would you replace the jets? If so, to which size?

Many thanks for any advice.

Best wishes,
Chris
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Old 03-26-2012, 06:25 PM   #13029
Ladder106
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Location: Davis, CA
Oddometer: 4,831
Chris,

I'd just make certain that the plugs that sometimes cover the idle mixture screws are removed.

The TA does a pretty fair job of compensating for altitude but it certainly won't idle at higher elevations unless you screw the mixture screws in a turn or 2. Not having the bike idle and having it hard to start is a real PITA at altitude.

Just realize that it's going to be WAY down on power....even just conversing at 16000 ft will have you gasping.

If your going to be doing serious off-road at that altitude you can pick up a bit of grunt by going down to a 14 T CS sprocket.....then change back when you come down.
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Old 03-26-2012, 06:42 PM   #13030
Ladder106
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TA engine mount improvement

This doesn't really qualify as a mod, but here's how I spent the afternoon.

Working on my son's PD06, checking engine mounts and other things. Tried check tightness on front mount and got this:



Now this is about the 3rd time this has happened to one of our Transalps and I finally got sick of it. These 8mm bolts are too long to do the job of an engine mount. Furthermore, the hole in the frame is just less than 9 mm so the bolts don't really fit snuggly in the frame at all...rather they just rattle around. Now I realize that drawing the two mounting plate together will likely create enough friction to not allow any real movement, I'm not certain what happens here with vibration.

The bolt measures 7.7 mm



and the hole measures 8.4 (actually a bit larger since my calipers would not fit all the way inside.



Now, a SAE 3/8 in bolt will measure 9.5mm but really most of the ones I found are 9.3. My 3/8 in. drill bit also measures 9.3.

So, it's time to loose about 1mm (dia) of metal from the front part of the frame. Center the lower mount with a tapered puch and proceed to drill out the top hole. Lots of oil and quite a bit of torque...but it really doesn't remove that much metal at all.



Ooops removed the punch before taking photo....

Lube and insert a nice Grade 8 SAE bolt.



Repeat on bottom hole:



Assemble:



Now the forward mount will actually do its job. You do have to break out the SAE tools to tighten this.
But I don't see it loosening up anytime soon.
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Old 03-26-2012, 06:48 PM   #13031
Hotmamaandme
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Location: Gardnerville NV
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As always Ray good info and great detailed steps for the ummm wrench challenged.
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Old 03-26-2012, 06:59 PM   #13032
Ladder106
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Hi Cory,

How's Dad's TA running?
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Old 03-26-2012, 07:39 PM   #13033
Hotmamaandme
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It's running great. He is really loving it. Thanks again.
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Old 03-28-2012, 11:10 PM   #13034
tgeliot
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Joined: Jun 2010
Location: Denver, CO
Oddometer: 1,343
Removing the steering stem

I believe that I have a problem very much like what Belgian_Waffles described last summer (see posting 12087 for a great illustration), to wit: twisted triple tree components resulting in skewed front fork legs. I'm trying to remove the triple tree from the frame so that I can assemble it with the fork legs away from the bike just as he did, for better examination. I can't quite figure out what I need to do to remove the steering stem from the frame.

When I first set about to do this work, I looked at the "nut" at the top of the stem, measured it, and went out and bought a 30mm socket. Well it turned out that that "nut" was really more like a dust cap, so it practically just fell off in my hand. I felt pretty silly with that 30mm socket; I could have removed that cap with a big pair of pliers. But at least now I have a 30mm socket :-)

The manual calls for a "Lock nut wrench, 30 x 32 mm" and a "Steering stem socket". Can anyone advise: do I really need some special tools here; if not, how do I proceed? My first step will be to just clean all the filth off the exposed parts. The next part I can see appears to be a sort of giant star washer, that I take to be a lock nut. Can I just take some giant pliers to that to unscrew it? But from the pictures in the manual, it looks like I may indeed need a magic steering stem socket. Yes? No?

All advise gratefully received.

Oh, the background: I wracked up the front end of the bike way back on 7/4/2010, twisting the forks and destroying the wheel. I hired another fellow to fix it; the wheel and fork legs were done by Woody's Wheel works. I honestly can't say for sure if the handlebars have been crooked ever since then or if somehow I got things wrong after that. I do know that last fall I tried several times to straighten them, having my large son hold the handlebars while I held the front wheel between my legs and torqued the pinch nuts that hold the fork legs in the triple tree, and despite repeated attempts always ended up with the handlebars canted relative to the wheel. At this point I'm moderately sure I have a bent triple tree.
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Old 03-29-2012, 06:13 AM   #13035
mas335
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Location: Piedmont region NC
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Topher...........>

Quote:
Originally Posted by tgeliot View Post
I believe that I have a problem very much like what Belgian_Waffles described last summer (see posting 12087 for a great illustration),This topic started at post 11988 and I would start there for all the comments to wit: twisted triple tree components resulting in skewed front fork legs. I'm trying to remove the triple tree from the frame so that I can assemble it with the fork legs away from the bike just as he did, for better examination. I can't quite figure out what I need to do to remove the steering stem from the frame. The shop manual walks you through this easy process.

When I first set about to do this work, I looked at the "nut" at the top of the stem, measured it, and went out and bought a 30mm socket. Well it turned out that that "nut" was really more like a dust cap, so it practically just fell off in my hand. It is not a dust cab but a significant steering stem nut with a required torque setting of 72 ft lbs. If it was loose then that might be the beginning of your problems. I felt pretty silly with that 30mm socket; I could have removed that cap with a big pair of pliers. But at least now I have a 30mm socket :-) You will need to to properly tighten the nut.

The manual calls for a "Lock nut wrench, 30 x 32 mm" and a "Steering stem socket". Can anyone advise: do I really need some special tools here; if not, how do I proceed? My first step will be to just clean all the filth off the exposed parts. The next part I can see appears to be a sort of giant star washer, that I take to be a lock nut. It appears you have found the bearing adjusting nut, channel locks or some type of tool can be used but to get the bearings adjusted correctly once things are put back together you will need something more apporpriate. Can I just take some giant pliers to that to unscrew it? But from the pictures in the manual, it looks like I may indeed need a magic steering stem socket. Yes? No? No, I actually use a older style bicycle Bottom Bracket tool which has a tab on it that hooks onto the lock ring perfectly, it is thin and I can make fine adjustments while everything is bolted back together but not after things are tightened.

All advise gratefully received.

Oh, the background: I wracked up the front end of the bike way back on 7/4/2010, twisting the forks and destroying the wheel. I hired another fellow to fix it; the wheel and fork legs were done by Woody's Wheel works. I honestly can't say for sure if the handlebars have been crooked ever since then or if somehow I got things wrong after that. I do know that last fall I tried several times to straighten them, having my large son hold the handlebars while I held the front wheel between my legs and torqued the pinch nuts that hold the fork legs in the triple tree, and despite repeated attempts always ended up with the handlebars canted relative to the wheel. At this point I'm moderately sure I have a bent triple tree.
Did you rule out the earlier suggest I offered thru your pm?
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