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Old 01-21-2013, 09:53 AM   #14176
2bold2getold
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr E View Post
Cool beans...that's what I love about this site so much is the diversity of everyone and the cordial nature. I had not found that thread before...now I have to go pull some of my images for things into there.
Yup, here's another one I really like. Not good at it, but I like it. http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=529412
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Old 01-21-2013, 11:39 AM   #14177
Rob 110
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr E View Post

This is the rebuilt 83' XR250 shock and spring installled



nice clean job Dr E 8)

just a quick observation that Ladder raised about changing the coolant bottle to accommodate the shock reservoir:
In the pic above, you have the remote going to the right side which saves changing the coolant bottle, thats what i did with my '83 CR250 shock :)

BUT: you have the banjo on the shock at the back, this won't work because the airbox will foul it!
I tried it this way but it won't go.
Luckily the guy who serviced my shock put the banjo back on the other way, so it exits the shock front to the right and i mounted the reservoir on the rightside frame (Monster can in my pics)

Hope this saves you a headache later DrE, or maybe you can use a heatgun to warm the airbox plastic and push it in to clear the banjo

hth
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Old 01-21-2013, 05:33 PM   #14178
Ladder106
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Rob,

Having the shock res. on the right solve some problems

BUT

How warm/hot does it get there?? It would seem that having the exhaust warming the shock oil is not the best thing to do.
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Old 01-21-2013, 06:21 PM   #14179
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I will be keeping the reservoir above the exhaust so as to avoid heating issues. Also, Rob thank you for the input about right side placement and the air box issue. I already plan on modifying the air box to account for any spacing issues. As the bike draws into the final phase, fitment of pieces will be the final aspect.
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Old 01-22-2013, 12:23 PM   #14180
Rob 110
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ladder106 View Post
Rob,

Having the shock res. on the right solve some problems

BUT

How warm/hot does it get there?? It would seem that having the exhaust warming the shock oil is not the best thing to do.
fair point but theres a couple of inches clearance between my can/pipe and the reservoir, i'll see how it goes when i'm riding
top of the shock is only a couple of inches from rear cylinder and exhaust manifold anyway

hopefully the reservoir is filled with nitrogen too, not oil
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Old 01-23-2013, 09:23 AM   #14181
Ladder106
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Rob,

Not suggesting you did anything wrong.....just one of those

"Have you thought of this" kinda responses.

Your observation about the entire shock being located near the hottest part of the engine is certainly valid.

I've often thought about building a "lightweight" Transalp and will watch your build with interest.
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Old 01-23-2013, 12:31 PM   #14182
Rob 110
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ladder106 View Post
Rob,

Not suggesting you did anything wrong.....just one of those

"Have you thought of this" kinda responses.

Your observation about the entire shock being located near the hottest part of the engine is certainly valid.

I've often thought about building a "lightweight" Transalp and will watch your build with interest.

its amazing how much all the Honda parts i removed weigh, i still have to add fairing panel and bashplate, so will probably only end up saving 10kg:
ADDED kg
REMOVED kg
HEADLIGHT, COWL, SIDEPANELS
5
Tail light/rack
3.250
Rear indicators
250g
centrestand
2.250
Plastic bashplate
1
Pillion pegs
2
zorst
6
yokes
1
swinger
1.5 heavier than RD03
Link pipe
1
Brake caliper
750g
Aprilla headlamp
600g
GSXR can
3.2kg
Husky tail/light
600g
TOTALS
5.4kg
20kg

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Old 01-24-2013, 05:17 PM   #14183
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This thread is doing great!
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Old 01-25-2013, 04:19 AM   #14184
BOBaloo22
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It's the first thing I check every morning!
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Old 01-25-2013, 02:39 PM   #14185
happyclam
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The knowledge and enthusiasm on this thread is awesome! I remember in 89' when the ta was 1st released. An informed motorcycle friend of mine referred to it as a "Translap", like a joke. I never got the joke nor forgot it. I was a thumper guy then, but knew a ta was in my future.Took one a while to find me,shes beat up and sore but when i ride her it's like hanging out with an old friend.
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Old 01-25-2013, 09:24 PM   #14186
TRBaron
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I got my TA serviced and rego'd after about 15 years of storage.
Also added a few new bits like SW-Motech crash bars since you can't get plastics these days and mine are already tired.
Using those new digital CDIs from Germany and stainless steel headers [also from Germany] and a carbon fibre muffler.
Had a new screen made up with 100mm high-rise over the stock part.
I've left the CDIs with their advanced ignition and am running higher octane fuel, seems to be running well.
Put about 300km on it about 50/50 dirt trails/tarmac so far and its doing fine.


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Old 01-25-2013, 11:43 PM   #14187
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More information on the digital CDIs would be good to have.

The stainless header are very pretty.

Well done, more photos would be nice as well.
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Old 01-26-2013, 06:10 AM   #14188
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+1 on the digital CDI's as well. She is really nice looking after all those years of storage. Any pictures from your rides by chance?
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Old 01-26-2013, 06:21 AM   #14189
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These ones perhaps? http://www.motorbike-shop.de/index.php?a=2892&lang=eng

For those not wanting to link ... here is description from site:

----------------------------------
The digital CDI for Honda Transalp PD06 or Africa Twin RD03 was revised in 2011.
It has an improved radio interference behavior and the selection between two ignition curves.
For better distinction, it was called "Dual Line" and equipped with a yellow wire-loop.
It can be selected between the original spark and a more advanced ignition curve (=Advanced).
By cutting the long black wire-loop, the spark is switched to the original angles.
The CDI is delivered with the advanced spark angles set.

The CDI operates on the following vehicles:
Honda Transalp PD06 built between '87 and '95 with and without side stand switch.
Africa Twin XRV650 RD03...

When the short yellowwire-loop next to the 4-pin connector is cut, the side stand switchbecomes active.
Mixed operation with an original CDI is possible, but for long term use we recommend to change both CDIs.
If the wiring system was modified or the vehicle imported from other countries, please feel free to contact us.

The Dual Line replaces these CDI-types (first the Honda part number, then in bold the designation on the CDI,
and last the condition of the wire-loop):

30410-MM9-008 MM9 CI529 wire-loop closed
30410-MM9-830 MM9 CI558 wire-loop cut
30410-MS8-610 MS8 CI558 wire-loop cut

Description
The digital CDIs are a new development and they are produced in the Blackforest.
The historic technology of the original box using thyristors and analog technology was replaced by a microprocessor.
The microprocessor controls the ignition voltage and triggers through an IGBT the spark exactly at the desired instant.

The ignition line is digitally stored and can not change because of the progessing age of the components.
For the original CDIs, the internal ignition condensers are above 5000rpm not charged to the desired voltage.
Hence, the energy of the spark can become as low as 30% compared to lower engine speed.

However, the spark energy of the digital CDIs is absolutely stable. Fluctuations of the supply voltage
are compensated over a wide range. The engine speed is detected and calculated for each revolution.
This leads from a transient condition to more advance, and improves the acceleration behaviour.
A special circuit protects the CDI reliably from access voltage, resulting for example from a kaputt voltage controller.
(we are Germans and say "kaputt" for broken, and we are confident enough to export our vocabulary.)
In comparison, the analog CDIs are not protected and can be harmed in such situations.

Because of the advanced spark, the engine delivers in the relevant speed range more power and torque.
Due to the stop of selling regular gas with 91 ROZ fuel, the minmum is 95 and there is no threat for the engine.
At the same time, the fuel consumption becomes lower, but in daily use this is tough to measure.
Engine performance and torque have been confirmed on dyno measurements.

The feedback of many Transalp- and Africa Twin riders corresponds to these facts:

... The CDIs operate wonderful and are better then the originals
... the Transalp purrs like a cat
... never ran that well than with these CDIs
... runs now remarkably faster
[ there are many more nice quotes like this ]

Dimensions: Length 90mm x width 60mm x depth 20mm (without connector)
Currently there is only a small sticker on the side defining the CDI type as TA-XL600V.
We recommend to put the CDIs into horizontal position. The holder H005 provides this for the Transalp.
Additionally we want to give you these links to the Transalp forums (if you discover new ones, share it with us):

http://www.transalp.de/technik/faq/cdi/
http://www.transalp.de/technik/reparaturen/zuendbox.php

Installation directions
Warning: Switch on the ignition only if both connectors are plugged into the CDI!

For vehicles with a side stand switch (regular case):
First it must be assured that the engine performs well with the CDI.
Check the side stand function. When side stand is down and a gear engaged, the engine won't be killed.
Take the bike for a long ride for several km.
In case it is not working properly, please contact us.

For the activation of the side stand switch, the yellow wire-loops on both CDIs are cut.
Repeat the test with the side stand, and now the engine must stall.
On vehicles without side stand switch (in Germany mainly sold in 1987), both yellow wire-loops must be closed!

The long, black wire-loop determines the ignition advance line.
Closed loop = Advance (more power, for 95 octane fuel or better)
Open loope = Original (for 91 octane fuel or worse)
The ends of the wires shall not be extended, as they become antennas and can give interference signals!
They must be protected against contact with a conductor that bears other voltage than ground!

One or two?
Under article name H003, a single CDI can be ordered or a CDI-pair under H004.
We recommend both CDIs to be replaced if :
- both CDIs have the same age or if their age is unknown.
- you plan to keep riding the bike for a long time.
- your budget allows it.

Important Hints:
The responsibility for operation with advanced ignition is solely on the customers.
The customer must assure that the operation is technically possible and legal.
M&S does not monitor fuel quality in all the individual countries and the legal situation for the modification.
M&S does not take over any responsibility for engine damage or violations of the law!
M&S is not aware of any damage caused by operation with Dual Line CDIs.
We don't have any evidence that the use of our CDIs is illegal in any country.
Our CDIs have been sold in the USA, all over Europe, South America and Africa (Morocco).
The postage worldwide for up to 2 CDIs in a certified letter is 7 ?, insurance for 100 ? value is 2 ?
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Old 01-26-2013, 07:06 AM   #14190
TRBaron
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Quote:
Originally Posted by R_Rick View Post
Yes, those are the ones.
You run them as is for 95/98 octane or cut a wire for <95 octane.
Someone who expects to go back and forth [depending on availability of fuel] might decide to cut the wire and fit a switch or clip of some kind I guess.

Headers from http://www.abp-racing.de
They don't have the easiest ordering system, particularly if you don't speak German, but they bolted straight on my original engine.
People claim they give extra engine power too, but I can't confirm that, not having a dyno test before and after.
Also they are slightly tighter going around the engine so no need for a leg guard to avoid burns which means the crash bars have plenty of clearance now.

I wish I'd remembered to take some pics of my first 2 rides, the second one in particular was very enjoyable even with light showers.
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