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Old 03-04-2015, 03:55 PM   #1
Kodachrome64 OP
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emergency repair/Maintenance musts

So I am a new rider. I have a 92' Nighthawk 750. I want to do some touring but I am afraid if the bike breaks somewhere remote i will be SOL. I want to learn some basics like how to change a tire and repair a tire. what do you think every adventure rider should be able to do. Also what parts should I carry in case of emergency. Even If its beyond my ability to fit atleast id have them so I could get a mechanic to do it.
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Old 03-04-2015, 04:27 PM   #2
oldmanb777
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Lots written about your question. The most important tool you can have, is a riding buddy, especially if he carries tools. The next most important thing you can carry is a SPOT. Seriously! there are times when it just can't be fixed in the field. That said, you will find lots of advice if you search. Just be able to do the basic stuff. Tighten some bolts, zip ties some stuff to get you to someplace where you can really repair it. Fix a flat. fix a chain. replace a fuse, repair a wire, fix a fuel leak. There are some bike specific stuff that makes sense. I'm sure I'm missing some things, but that is a pretty good start.
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Old 03-04-2015, 04:43 PM   #3
Kodachrome64 OP
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Originally Posted by oldmanb777 View Post
Lots written about your question. The most important tool you can have, is a riding buddy, especially if he carries tools. The next most important thing you can carry is a SPOT. Seriously! there are times when it just can't be fixed in the field. That said, you will find lots of advice if you search. Just be able to do the basic stuff. Tighten some bolts, zip ties some stuff to get you to someplace where you can really repair it. Fix a flat. fix a chain. replace a fuse, repair a wire, fix a fuel leak. There are some bike specific stuff that makes sense. I'm sure I'm missing some things, but that is a pretty good start.
ok I may be an idiot but what is a SPOT

Prepares to feel stupid
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Old 03-04-2015, 04:53 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kodachrome64 View Post
ok I may be an idiot but what is a SPOT

Prepares to feel stupid
http://findmespot.com/en/index.php?c...campaign=trace

Not everybody that travels needs a spot. It depends on what kind of trips and what kind of terrain. I've been riding and camping since the 80's, I've never owned a spot. But I do consider terrain and cell reception, and I have rented a sat-phone for an occasional trip. Prolly also depends on whether you're traveling alone or with a partner / group.

Edit - I would say start doing all of your maintenance and repairs at home with the tools you plan to carry on trips. If you're not comfortable doing it, find a friend a or a mechanic that will let you help. Post up where you're located, and I'm sure you'll find some inmates who would be happy to help you with just about anything.
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Old 03-04-2015, 04:58 PM   #5
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http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=262998

Look here, a lot is overkill, but there is a lot of valuable information.
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Old 03-05-2015, 04:18 AM   #6
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Welcome to the forum! Where are you, and where do you plan to go?

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kodachrome64 View Post
So I am a new rider. I have a 92' Nighthawk 750. I want to do some touring but I am afraid if the bike breaks somewhere remote i will be SOL. I want to learn some basics like how to change a tire and repair a tire. what do you think every adventure rider should be able to do. Also what parts should I carry in case of emergency. Even If its beyond my ability to fit atleast id have them so I could get a mechanic to do it.
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Old 03-05-2015, 05:02 AM   #7
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I like to use heavy duty tubes in my tires since it's easier to prevent a flat than than get one far from home. Replace them every other tire change and keep them as a spare. Always carry tire plugs and some type of inflator for the tubeless ones.
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Old 03-05-2015, 06:12 AM   #8
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All the tools you'll need to do roadside work (and quite a lot more) will fit in a very small tool roll. Experience will tell you what those tools are besides screwdrivers, pliers, and a socket set.

Tire plug kit for tubeless tires, and a way to air 'em up.

Tube for tube tires, and some practice in swapping them.

Beyond tire repair, I wouldn't bother carrying spare parts.

AAA card for the more serious failures away from home.

Credit card.

Flashlight (headlamp preferred).

Keeping your bike maintained is the best way to avoid breakdowns...
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Old 03-05-2015, 07:36 AM   #9
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Get a



Bear in mind this is the English version so everything's on the correct side. For the Yank version, just stand back to front and for the Aussie, upside down.

Add in some youtube tutorials, a modicum of common sense, a whole loads of patience, some semi-decent tools that won't make things any worse than they already are, a roll of duct tape, some cable ties, a can of WD40, a big fat wallet and the vast knowledge base of the inmates here and there's nothing you can't do on that bike.

Throw in a garage, some mates, a radio and a few beers and you're in for some great weekends.


Caveat - the Haynes manuals are created by stripping down a brand new bike and putting it back together again. They don't take into account 20 years of wear, tear and careless owners - as long as you bear that in mind, prep the work area with some WD40 a day or two in advance and you're (usually) golden.

catweasel67 screwed with this post 03-05-2015 at 07:44 AM
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Old 03-05-2015, 07:46 AM   #10
D.T.
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nOOb definitely came to the right website for this info.

Knowing your bike inside and out is the best thing you can do. Then take the precautions to avoid breakdowns.

Just start reading. May take 5 years to read it all but you can't beat this site for motorcycle maintenance. Being filthy rich helps too.

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Old 03-05-2015, 01:09 PM   #11
Fixnfly
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Being filthy rich helps too.


Imagine being rich enough to just leave a broken bike along the road or trail and catch a ride home.
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Old 03-05-2015, 02:06 PM   #12
draco_1967
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With a Nighthawk that is well maintained, there isn't a whole lot to go wrong. Oil/filter change, tires, chain, spark plugs, and air filter are about it. They are very reliable machines.
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Old 03-05-2015, 02:19 PM   #13
Johann
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Quote:
Originally Posted by catweasel67 View Post
Caveat - the Haynes manuals are created by stripping down a brand new bike and putting it back together again.
IME a Haynes manual will show detailed instructions on how to dismantle any part of your bike followed by a single line at the end of each chapter, "to reassemble reverse the above procedure." Try and get hold of a workshop manual, there are probably free scanned downloads available if you look around or ask on Honda forums.
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Old 03-05-2015, 02:28 PM   #14
Beezer
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take a day (or 2) at home and get out the factory tool kit that came with the bike. change the oil & filter, then do the tires, air filter, battery, chain, spark plug, and light bulbs. change the brake pads and bleed the brakes. service the forks. adjust the suspension, seat, windscreen, clutch and brake levers, the mirrors, and whatever else that moves on the bike. tighten the luggage rack.

if the original tool kit can do all that you're OK, otherwise, add what you need & thats the "away" tool kit.

out of that lot, the tire change is the hardest if you've never done one. it helps to get some dual time with somebody that knows how.
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Old 03-05-2015, 03:02 PM   #15
draco_1967
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Originally Posted by Beezer View Post
take a day (or 2) at home and get out the factory tool kit that came with the bike. change the oil & filter, then do the tires, air filter, battery, chain, spark plug, and light bulbs. change the brake pads and bleed the brakes. service the forks. adjust the suspension, seat, windscreen, clutch and brake levers, the mirrors, and whatever else that moves on the bike. tighten the luggage rack.

if the original tool kit can do all that you're OK, otherwise, add what you need & thats the "away" tool kit.

out of that lot, the tire change is the hardest if you've never done one. it helps to get some dual time with somebody that knows how.
The factory toolkit on the Nighawk is made out of cheese-monkeymetal alloy. I wouldn't trust it to do any serious work, but that is a good way to know what tools you should start with. The only thing of value in it is the JIS screwdriver (don't use phillips drivers on JIS screws).

The most common fasteners are 8, 10, 12, and 14mm bolts/nuts, then the axle bolts (I don't remember...I think 17mm and 24mm)
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