ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Fluff > Shiny things
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 619 votes, 4.95 average. Display Modes
Old 09-28-2011, 10:07 AM   #20611
Sniper X
De Oppresso Liber
 
Sniper X's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Location: Central New Mexico, 7420ft above sea level
Oddometer: 33,300
Quote:
Originally Posted by EvilGenius View Post
That they shoot so much better so easily.
At paper. Most women have slow twitch muscles, most men have fast twitch muscles making a lot of women better at accuracy on paper. And making men more accurate at competition like three gun and so on. And in firefights (combat), men seem to be worlds better than women.
__________________
" The people who cast the votes decide nothing. The people who count the votes decide everything."
Straight Out Da Trailah!
Sniper X is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2011, 10:12 AM   #20612
MZcountryboy
Beastly Adventurer
 
MZcountryboy's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2005
Location: Northeast Kingdom, Vermont USA (close to Canada!)
Oddometer: 5,449
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tellydoug View Post
One quart of Hydrogen peroxide, 1/4 cup of baking soda, one tbsp dish soap. Mix it and apply to the affected area immediately, it has a chemical reaction that totally neutralizes the scent.

You could spray it on the ground where the skunk let loose, you'll have to figure out that application for your particular circumstances.

Did just this, sprayed on the ground in the area he was, uh, eliminated at.

I've got the windows in the house open even, no smell! Thanks!


One more to go...........
MZcountryboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2011, 10:19 AM   #20613
LAZ 1
Adventurer
 
Joined: Sep 2011
Location: "Fantasy Island aka Vancouver Island, BC, CANADA
Oddometer: 53
Bowling with a .45 Super

Quote:
Originally Posted by HardCase View Post
The range I belong to always has several dozen bowling pins in varying states of deconstruction, plus a special pistol-bay with a steel bowling pin table, so anyone can set up and practice. I've really shot only a very few pin matches over the years, but they are pretty popular around here. I'm not into the competitive end of it, just enjoy the practice. I especially love shooting pins with the 500, they truly fly and then when they land they spin on the ground like a top for a while.....

Edit: No, I do not advocate the 500 as a pin gun, it only holds 5 rounds leaving not one iota of margin-for-error, and the recoil makes follow-up shots damned slow!
Back in the day, we had one club that loved to put on bowling pin matches. There were FIVE stages, revolver, pistol, shotgun, and rifle at 7 yds, and rifle again at 100 yds. At 100 yds you just had to drop the pin off of a railroad tie, not push it back 3' off the 4' X 8' steel table, like you did at the closer stages. Fastest time won the pot,
$ 5.00 a pass, and if we had enough time, you could do as many passes as you could afford, until you ran out of ammo or $$$. Low time pass got 60% of the pot, second got 30%, and third got 10% ... which is why we called these matches "Bowling for Dollars".

I used to shoot the pistol stage with a .45 Super modified Randall SS Govt model. When I started out at the bowling pin game, I used a coned SS 6" barrel that was not ramped. After a few hundred rounds of HOT .45 Super, I broke off the lugs on that barrel, and went to a 6" Coned and RAMPED SS barrel. The ramped barrel was much easier on the brass, and the extra meat behind the lugs prevented any more breakages.

The pins sure jumped when you hit them properly with the .45 Super. The .45 Super loads are not quite up to .44 Mag for power, but were plenty powerful enough to reliably motivate the pins. I had some 180 gr loads that did 1400 fps, and the Hornady 230 FP bullet was getting 1200 FPS. The .45 Super was THEORETICALLY supposed to be a lot easier to control in fast shooting than a .44 Mag revolver ... theoretically!!!!

I also used a 7" ported .44 Mag Ruger Redhawk for pins on the revolver stage. I found that I could CONSISTENTLY clean the table with the .44 revolver in winning times, and with the .45 Super Govt model auto, I could occasionally do some very fast 5 shot clean passes, but almost always I had to return to pick up a "spare". There were a few REALLY GOOD [ as in Canadian National and World class ] IPSC shooters at these matches, shooting regular .45 ACP Govt models, usually with comps, and I never managed to win a pistol stage ... although I some times placed in the $$$.

It seems the .44 Mag revolver, with the long DA pull, slowed me down just enough to make me to shoot more accurately, than when I hosed the pins down with the much lighter single action pull on the Govt model. Which was odd, because in practice, I shot probably 100 rds of IPSC Major .45 for every round of .44 Mag.

I usually won the shotgun stage, because I used a Rem 1100 semi auto in 20 Ga, with light skeet loads, while my competition preferred the 12 Ga, with buck or some other HEAVY load. The lighter recoiling Rem was super fast, and the skeet loads at 7 yds did the job reliably..

On the rifle stage, at 7 yds, I used my AR 10, WITH .308 SOFT POINT 150 gr bullets, which usually won the top $$$, except for the last year, when a guy showed up with a Ruger .44 Mag carbine with a Red dot, and I had to settle for second. It was hilarious to watch the guys with .223 cal rifles trying to "motivate" the bowling pins. The .223 did NOT have enough OOMPH to reliably clean a pin, and watching some guys empty a 30 rd mag at a couple of stubborn "wounded" pins, was a real gong show.

At the 100 yd stage, the AR 10 with a scope, [ from drop down prone ] usually took the cash.

I sure do miss the good ol' days ... bowling for $$$.
[;{)
LAZ 1
LAZ 1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2011, 10:20 AM   #20614
EvilGenius
1.5 Finger Discount
 
EvilGenius's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2007
Location: DFW, Texas
Oddometer: 20,309
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sniper X View Post
At paper. Most women have slow twitch muscles, most men have fast twitch muscles making a lot of women better at accuracy on paper. And making men more accurate at competition like three gun and so on. And in firefights (combat), men seem to be worlds better than women.
Is that why they tend to make good snipers?

Potential moral/ethical stuff aside, I'd think sniping would be more like range shooting than running around in a firefight.
__________________
"Try turning that burn into torque. Then we're getting somewhere. Riding the potato to work seems quite impractical." - anotherguy

"Never bring a Nerf gun to a shovel fight." - My Brother
EvilGenius is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2011, 12:07 PM   #20615
Sniper X
De Oppresso Liber
 
Sniper X's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Location: Central New Mexico, 7420ft above sea level
Oddometer: 33,300
Quote:
Originally Posted by EvilGenius View Post
Is that why they tend to make good snipers?

Potential moral/ethical stuff aside, I'd think sniping would be more like range shooting than running around in a firefight.
They do, but only the US as far as I know does not have Female Snipers. And yes that is why they make such great Snipers. I have both so made a good one and shoot pretty well at targets with pistols and am even better when the speed picks up. I still suck at shooting for the most part.
__________________
" The people who cast the votes decide nothing. The people who count the votes decide everything."
Straight Out Da Trailah!
Sniper X is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2011, 01:08 PM   #20616
HardCase
winter is coming
 
HardCase's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2004
Location: chambers on the Third
Oddometer: 9,794
A gun report

Do you have a gun (or more than one) which has been significant in your life? First hunting gun, big elk shot under tough conditions, or some other “if this gun could talk” tale to tell? Here’s one, nothing real special to look at, a 1972-vintage S&W Model 67 in 38 Special. I bought it new in the summer of that year, the first handgun I ever purchased, first of many. I had gotten out of the Army in April and was planning to start school in the fall, had a little $ saved and decided to take the summer off and loaf. Part of loafing for me meant backpacking in the backcountry of NW Montana. I had a 6 ˝” Model 27, a great gun that my dad had given me several years earlier, but it was pretty big and cumbersome and I wanted something lighter and was also excited about the prospect of having a stainless steel gun, something that was very uncommon at that time. The Model 60 (snub-nosed j-frame 38) had come out in the ‘60s, and the next SS guns that Smith made were the 66, 67 and I think there was one other model. I wanted the 66 as it was a .357 and I thought it looked cooler too, but those were real hard to come by and I located this 67 on a local dealer’s shelf, the price was reasonable (I recall that it was about $135 at the time which, in today’s dollars, would be approaching a grand). I had the money so I bought it.



I hauled that gun with me everywhere, backpacking, hiking, on road-trips, wherever I went for the next several years that gun was stashed somewhere nearby. Given the occasional proximity of griz, I can’t say I ever felt entirely adequately armed with it in the backcountry, but it gave me a slightly better sense of security than a Swiss Army knife. And I practiced with it a fair bit. One of the things I discovered I didn’t like about an all SS gun was that the sights were hard to see in bright sunlight. This gun had ‘white’ front and rear sights, matching the rest of it, so I would blacken them periodically with a stick-match, book-match or candle. You can still see some of the soot from those treatments even though I’ve not given it one in decades. Most SS guns nowadays, at least the ones with adjustable sights, have black sight blades, or some sort of colored insert. Not this one. But it also has the sweet tapered barrel which is pinned, and a very nice buttery smooth DA and crisp SA trigger pull. I’ve never had to do anything to the gun, it has worked perfectly from the day I bought it right up to today, nearly 40 years later.



To be continued.....
__________________
Μολών λαβέ

Hard cases make bad law.
HardCase is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2011, 01:22 PM   #20617
HardCase
winter is coming
 
HardCase's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2004
Location: chambers on the Third
Oddometer: 9,794
In the summer of ’74, just weeks after I had gotten married, I used the gun to prevent a home-invasion burglary. We were living in a scruffy part of town, being impoverished college kids, and a guy tried to kick his way into our studio apartment at about 3am. He withdrew upon becoming aware of the the gun from my shout, or hearing it being cocked……I was a SA shooter at that time…..but I recall realizing that I’d not hesitate to shoot him if he had entered the apartment and suspect that I would have. I’m damned glad that didn’t happen, hate to think how it would have impacted my life, or the douche-bag’s and his loved-ones. Hopefully he was just a confused doofus drunk and didn’t victimize someone else later on.



In ’88 my wife and I parted ways. By then I had accumulated quite a few guns. She wasn’t real interested in them, but asked if she could have one. I said she could and she selected the M67. I gave it little thought thereafter, but would remember it occasionally and fondly.

In 2004 I was visiting our adult son in Minneapolis. He was showing me a couple of guns he had inherited from his maternal grandfather, and as part of that process out came the 67! I was very surprised to see it and he told me that his mom had given it to him several years before, saying she didn’t even recall where it came from. Knowing her, it had been in the bottom of a box of old clothes since 1988. I told him the story, which he found interesting. As luck would have it, he was covetous of a Model 625 (45ACP revolver, N-frame) that I had, so I offered him a straight-across trade. He was thrilled with the trade which, from a purely monetary/value perspective was a smokin’ deal for him, but I was just happy to have the old 67 back.



In ’05 I used it in a couple of IDPA matches, and then acquired a new S&W 66-7 for that purpose. The bigger grips were purchased in ’05 for use in those matches, and they are very nice grips, but I put the OEMs back on and they will stay. The gun now resides in the safe in honored retirement. Don't ya just love happy endings?

So, anyone, give us a gun report/story/legend if you have a fabled gun in your safe or night-stand. It doesn’t have to be anything fancy, probably won’t be.
__________________
Μολών λαβέ

Hard cases make bad law.
HardCase is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2011, 01:22 PM   #20618
Uncle Pollo
happy cachiporra
 
Uncle Pollo's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2006
Location: Albuquerque, Neue Messico
Oddometer: 47,364
Quote:
Originally Posted by LAZ 1 View Post
It seems the .44 Mag revolver, with the long DA pull, slowed me down just enough to make me to shoot more accurately, than when I hosed the pins down with the much lighter single action pull on the Govt model. Which was odd, because in practice, I shot probably 100 rds of IPSC Major .45 for every round of .44 Mag.

[;{)
LAZ 1
I thought it was just me.
Uncle Pollo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2011, 01:24 PM   #20619
Sniper X
De Oppresso Liber
 
Sniper X's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Location: Central New Mexico, 7420ft above sea level
Oddometer: 33,300
I (unfortunately) no longer have any of my "first" guns, neither my first shotgun, rifle, or revolver or 1911. I do have the first 1911 I ever built myself, from a basic RIA Tactical to a tack driving fool of a 1911 with all top of the line Wilson igniotion parts and a Breiley barrel bushing. If I had to sell it I would have to sell it for $900.00 which I would never get for an RIA! So I guess I will; have it forever!

__________________
" The people who cast the votes decide nothing. The people who count the votes decide everything."
Straight Out Da Trailah!
Sniper X is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2011, 02:30 PM   #20620
FatChance
Road Captain
 
FatChance's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2003
Location: Durango, Colorado, USA
Oddometer: 10,079
Quote:
Originally Posted by HardCase View Post
So, anyone, give us a gun report/story/legend if you have a fabled gun in your safe or night-stand.
I wish I could tell some tales of the pre-civil war 1857 vintage 1851 Navy Colt I have, but its history is unknown to me.

However, here is one story I could tell about a gun, sorry for the length. Back in about 1994, I bought a 1883 vintage 1881 Marlin 45-70 lever action rifle that was on consignment at Bighorn Trading in Boulder (used to be the one of the best gun stores in Colorado). It was in fairly rough condition, but the action worked and it was all there except the extractor was broken. It even had a knot in the butt stock. The seller was the great-grandson of the original owner who bought it new in 1883 and took it across the country in a covered wagon. When this fellow got married, his new wife didn't want any guns in the house so the wimp sold this family heirloom and I was the beneficiary.

My office was about 5 blocks away from Bighorn Trading in downtown Boulder. I paid $750 for it, took possession and walked back to my office carrying this antique rifle. I got to about 50' from my office and four Boulder Police cars came flying up, screeched to a stop and surrounded me, guns drawn. I did what they said (they took the rifle and handcuffed me) and I told them it is an antique I just purchased, it was unloaded, I had the receipt and it was totally legal for me to openly carry it, even in downtown Boulder!

After checking everything out and sort of pissed that I was correct about the legality, the cop holding the rifle let it slip from his hands and dropped it muzzle down on the sidewalk. That was too much for me and I laid into him asking if he was playing hookey on the day they covered firearms safety in the police academy and threated to sue him for damages and damned his parent's heritage. I got a little agitated and said I was going to take my gun and walk into my office and if they wanted to waste anymore of my time they could call and make an appointment.

About a week later I contacted a gunsmith in Florida who said he could make me a new extractor (the old one was broken) if I sent him the bolt. So, I took the bolt and the magazine tube (it needed a dent removed) to a shipping office next to Bighorn, had them package it, insured it (for $1000) and sent it off. UPS found the box ripped open a couple days later and never found the parts! After again getting a little agitated (I'm normally pretty easy going), I asked for my $1000 insurance. They argued it was over insured but I demanded they either find my parts, get replacement parts or give me the money since they packaged it and sold me insurance. They paid, but I had an unusable rifle missing the bolt and magazine tube.

A couple weeks later, Bighorn called and said they located another 1881 Marlin .45-70 that had been way over restored, but was otherwise in complete operating condition. The serial number was less that 700 different from my 1881 and also made in 1883, so I bought it with some of the insurance money and the parts fit perfectly in my original 1881. I finished cleaning up my old 1881 (I much preferred the one in rough, original condition!) and used it for several years in SASS competitions. I cast my own bullets and loaded Goex black powder and it was a hoot to shoot like it's early days more than a century earlier!

Now, I have about 1.95 Marlin 1881 .45-70 rifles! I keep looking for another bolt and magazine tube, but they are pretty hard to find, y'know?

__________________
Pain in the Butte Ranch
Durango, Colorado

- Calculated risk or forbidden fruit?

FatChance screwed with this post 09-28-2011 at 02:50 PM
FatChance is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2011, 02:31 PM   #20621
HardCase
winter is coming
 
HardCase's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2004
Location: chambers on the Third
Oddometer: 9,794
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sniper X View Post
I (unfortunately) no longer have any of my "first" guns, neither my first shotgun, rifle, or revolver or 1911. I do have the first 1911 I ever built myself, from a basic RIA Tactical to a tack driving fool of a 1911 with all top of the line Wilson igniotion parts and a Breiley barrel bushing. If I had to sell it I would have to sell it for $900.00 which I would never get for an RIA! So I guess I will; have it forever!
Hey, that's cool. Mostly I was just interested in hearing guns talk, about ones with good stories behind them, whether it be a chain of possession/pedigree, or how one was used, interesting anecdotes, that sort of thing. We seem to go on in this thread about technical specs or what shoots better or how much stuff costs, but I thought it would be interesting to "humanize" some of these tools a bit, show how they are sometimes historical artifacts in our personal lives.
__________________
Μολών λαβέ

Hard cases make bad law.
HardCase is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2011, 02:35 PM   #20622
HardCase
winter is coming
 
HardCase's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2004
Location: chambers on the Third
Oddometer: 9,794
Great story FatChance, that's the sort of thing I'm looking for!!
__________________
Μολών λαβέ

Hard cases make bad law.
HardCase is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2011, 02:51 PM   #20623
slipjoint
Engraver
 
slipjoint's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2006
Location: N. CA
Oddometer: 492
I have carried this 1911 for about 10 years now - I own smaller carry guns but the 1911 carried cocked & loaded is still my altime favorite - I have been in the gun business for about 50 years now so I have had a chance to handle a few firearms. - Tom

slipjoint is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2011, 03:02 PM   #20624
FatChance
Road Captain
 
FatChance's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2003
Location: Durango, Colorado, USA
Oddometer: 10,079
Quote:
Originally Posted by HardCase View Post
We seem to go on in this thread about technical specs or what shoots better or how much stuff costs, but I thought it would be interesting to "humanize" some of these tools a bit, show how they are sometimes historical artifacts in our personal lives.
On the other hand:

"Only accurate rifles are interesting".

- Townsend Whelen


__________________
Pain in the Butte Ranch
Durango, Colorado

- Calculated risk or forbidden fruit?
FatChance is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2011, 03:20 PM   #20625
EvilGenius
1.5 Finger Discount
 
EvilGenius's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2007
Location: DFW, Texas
Oddometer: 20,309
Quote:
Originally Posted by FatChance View Post
On the other hand:

"Only accurate rifles are interesting".

- Townsend Whelen


Historical accuracy counts.
__________________
"Try turning that burn into torque. Then we're getting somewhere. Riding the potato to work seems quite impractical." - anotherguy

"Never bring a Nerf gun to a shovel fight." - My Brother
EvilGenius is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 04:34 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014