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Old 12-04-2008, 11:24 PM   #46
breakdown
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I was strongly tempted by the retro Ducatis before I picked up my Hypermotard. I really liked both the GT1000 and Sport 1000. They're such nice looking bikes. The GT1000 looks like it would be a great bike for just cruising around town and back roads on at a nice pace.

One test ride on the Hyper sealed the deal for me however. As much as I like the looks of the retro Ducatis, the Hyper suits my riding style better.
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Old 12-05-2008, 06:43 AM   #47
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Personally i would go for a Scrambler but thats because in the North West theres ALOT of forest service roads to be explored. But if i were going road only, id get the Duc. A guy i used to ride with had one of the new retro Ducs and well, it looks kinda old but its a modern bike. The rate at which one pulls away from you will tell you that
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Old 12-05-2008, 12:47 PM   #48
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I test rode a Duc GT1000 and liked it, but the price +the price of insurance for it pretty much turned me away from it for a bike that would see little use. Was not real fond of the rear end syling of it. Came across a very lightly used Thruxton that had already undergone the clip-on to flat bar modification at a pretty attractive price. Got it and have been nothing but happy with it. Not all that powerful, but damn smooth and just plain enjoyable to ride.

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Old 12-05-2008, 04:19 PM   #49
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I agree, I added heli bars to mine (would have liked the CEK) but wasnt in stock when I got the bike. It does add to the comfort.
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Old 12-06-2008, 04:45 AM   #50
sbn OP
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Those thruxtons look nice.

Is the footrests placed different on that bike compaired to the bonneville?
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Old 12-06-2008, 04:58 AM   #51
dave1068
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There rearsets. There back several more inches than on the bonne. For those of us that are tall, its actually more comfortable than the bonne. (provided you change the bars)
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Old 12-06-2008, 05:14 AM   #52
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dave1068
There rearsets. There back several more inches than on the bonne. For those of us that are tall, its actually more comfortable than the bonne. (provided you change the bars)
ok and how tall are you? I'm 6 feet (183 cm) tall and about 200 lbs (93 kg).
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Old 12-06-2008, 05:19 AM   #53
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If you think you're getting a 50% power gain out of a Triumph Thruxton with a different exhaust and re-chip... because the distributor's dyno chart says so... Oh boy, I don't know where to begin.

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Old 12-06-2008, 07:23 AM   #54
srileo
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I'm liking this thread a lot, please continue guys!
I too am looking for a retro-classic. the Triumphs appeal to me on several levels of simplicity and price compared to the ducs.
But i am doubtlful that the triumphs could match my current Wee for long-range touring ability. The bonnie perhaps could, but that means suspension changes and seat and windshield.... oh well...
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Old 12-06-2008, 08:50 AM   #55
Steve G.
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Both the Triumphs and Ducati 'classic's' have their negatives & positives. I think they all are great 'looking' bikes, except the GT 1000, just too much room between the seat & rear tire.
But the visual aspect is where the two makes have a thumbs up. The performance and handling are worlds apart between Triumph & Ducati. The Triumphs in stock trim are of course perfect for 'punters', those that like to casually ride around. Performance of the engine AND the suspension does not scream 'performance'. The suspension is just ok, marginal, it can be pushed to it's limit with not much effort.
The Ducati's in stock trim, engine performance and suspension capabilities, will spank a Triumph. Yes, you could spend thousands on tuning on both, but chasing horsepower and suspension gains on what is basically a retro bike is in my opinion a fools game, it's way cheaper to just buy a higher performing bike out of the box.
Ultimately, I think from riding both the Thruxton and the Paul Smart, the final decision is going to come down to riding position. Putting higher bars on any of these bikes spoils the look of them, which is a main reason these are being purchased. That said, the Thruxton riding position is much easier to live with than the Ducati's [excepting the already ugly GT1000] . Any normal person will find riding around for a whole day to be very ..........taxing on the wrists while on a Ducati.
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Old 12-06-2008, 08:57 AM   #56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve G.
Both the Triumphs and Ducati 'classic's' have their negatives & positives. I think they all are great 'looking' bikes, except the GT 1000, just too much room between the seat & rear tire.
But the visual aspect is where the two makes have a thumbs up. The performance and handling are worlds apart between Triumph & Ducati. The Triumphs in stock trim are of course perfect for 'punters', those that like to casually ride around. Performance of the engine AND the suspension does not scream 'performance'. The suspension is just ok, marginal, it can be pushed to it's limit with not much effort.
The Ducati's in stock trim, engine performance and suspension capabilities, will spank a Triumph. Yes, you could spend thousands on tuning on both, but chasing horsepower and suspension gains on what is basically a retro bike is in my opinion a fools game, it's way cheaper to just buy a higher performing bike out of the box.
Ultimately, I think from riding both the Thruxton and the Paul Smart, the final decision is going to come down to riding position. Putting higher bars on any of these bikes spoils the look of them, which is a main reason these are being purchased. That said, the Thruxton riding position is much easier to live with than the Ducati's [excepting the already ugly GT1000] . Any normal person will find riding around for a whole day to be very ..........taxing on the wrists while on a Ducati.
Steve
Ok thank you very much for you very helpfull imput. I think you are right about chasing horsepower and suspension gains on thiese retro bikes. High performance is not the reason I want to get one.
For me its just to cruise around on on nice sunny days. For long trips and rainy days I have my bmw 1150 adv
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Old 12-06-2008, 10:06 AM   #57
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Eh? Scare tactics......

Friend SBN......

Some here seem to be rather ignorant and/or hostile regarding the Ducati GT-1000. Mine was purchased new in May 2007, and has been the most satisfying motorcycle I've owned in 30 years. Don't be scared away from riding one. If the bike suits you, don't be afraid to own one. Just this caution, which applies to ANY motor vehicle: TAKE A GOOD LOOK AT LOCAL DEALER SUPPORT!

Does my 'Lil Miss Duckie have her shortcomings? Certainly, as every motorcycle does. My fuel tank did spread, but the dealer shimmed it up nicely, and there's no visual difference. The suspension is on the stiff side, but it is also carves corners splendidly with great feedback - neutral, nimble and firmly planted. The ride 2-up is even better! The tank hold less than 4 gallons, but has returned over 50 MPG on several long rides, and averages 44 MPG in town. At low speeds the fuel injection is a bit abrupt, but one learns of ways of controlling that - and the Ducati.ms board guys have a trick plug-in that seems to cure the problem easily and cheaply if it bothers you.

On the positive side, the power she makes with the Termi mufflers/ECU kit is just so damn wonderful! Stong torque is there from 3500 RPM right up to the rev-limiter at 9700. I had a dyno run performed at her 7500-mile service, returning 83 horses and 65 ft-lb of torque at the rear wheel (90F temps at Denver's 5200' altitude). The engine is remarkably smooth, for a solidly-mounted, 993cc twin. The riding position and seat are very comfortable for me. And I ALWAYS get positive comments from people EVERY time I ride, even from folks who know nothing about motorcycles.....an intense ego-boost for an ugly old-phart like me, yanno! If you search my posts, you'll find plenty of pics.

In 9890 miles over 19 months of ownership, used for daily commute to work, day-trips with Rockies Region ADV-friends, and some fast-paced 'canyon-dancing' in the Colorado Mountains, this GT-1000 has yet to disappoint me. She does everything that I need her to do, and all of them very well.

As always, I'll never pretend to speak for every owner. Everyone is different, and everyone has their own likes/dislikes. Don't buy any bike based on looks, brand or mystique......ride everything that interests you, and buy what thrills you the most. Motorcycles are an intensely personal form of transportation, and one size NEVER fits all. In the end, it's just like any other purchase - not a marriage. If time tarnishes your feelings, then trade it in on something you'd rather own.

Fair enough?
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Old 12-06-2008, 10:06 AM   #58
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve G.
Both the Triumphs and Ducati 'classic's' have their negatives & positives. I think they all are great 'looking' bikes, except the GT 1000, just too much room between the seat & rear tire.
But the visual aspect is where the two makes have a thumbs up. The performance and handling are worlds apart between Triumph & Ducati. The Triumphs in stock trim are of course perfect for 'punters', those that like to casually ride around. Performance of the engine AND the suspension does not scream 'performance'. The suspension is just ok, marginal, it can be pushed to it's limit with not much effort.
The Ducati's in stock trim, engine performance and suspension capabilities, will spank a Triumph. Yes, you could spend thousands on tuning on both, but chasing horsepower and suspension gains on what is basically a retro bike is in my opinion a fools game, it's way cheaper to just buy a higher performing bike out of the box.
Ultimately, I think from riding both the Thruxton and the Paul Smart, the final decision is going to come down to riding position. Putting higher bars on any of these bikes spoils the look of them, which is a main reason these are being purchased. That said, the Thruxton riding position is much easier to live with than the Ducati's [excepting the already ugly GT1000] . Any normal person will find riding around for a whole day to be very ..........taxing on the wrists while on a Ducati.
Steve

I owned an 05 Thruxton - an absolutely beautiful motorcycle. The quote above is dead on - IMHO lots of triumph twin owners get way too excited about coaxing more hp from these. Anything beyond pipes and jets, it's a lot of time and effort for very minimal power increases. The Triumph forums are full of guys talking about how they can almost/sorta/kinda/not really keep up with modern sportbikes after tons of mods. These weren't built to keep up with a modern sportbike. Fun and cool all day long used as intended. I think the Thrux might be the best looking motorcycle sold today.
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Old 12-06-2008, 10:20 AM   #59
dave1068
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I;ll add my .03, Ive had a few triumphs and always liked the gt1000. The gap between the rear fender and tire was a bit odd but not a deal breaker. The price and some of the problems I heard about dialing in the FI, etc kind of turned me off. I still love the looks of it. I kind of like the old school charm of the thrux with carbs, easy to work on and classic looks. I got a 2007 in august w/ 5800 miles and have done about 2500-3000 miles in about 3 months, (a lot of riding to say the least)

Very fun bike and smooth especially for a twin. Its not perfect and could probably use susp mods and thats about it. It came w/ tors, a flyscreen and a cool oil-temp gauge. I had them throw on heli-bars, Im 6'2 and 205-210 depending on how much candy is around and Ive done 2-3 hrs rides w/ minimal breaks and not too much discomfort.

I can cruise around at 80 mph indicated and its smooth, fun and not too buzzy. I agree w/ the above posts, some of my fellow triumph brethren will spend big money to squeeze out minimal performance, I say spend that money on gas or a leather jacket. With the TORs it came with Id say the bike probably has 75HP which is plenty for sunday afternoon rides and trips up to 200-300 miles.

With its checkered or striped tank and matching rear cowl, its a classic fun bike that easy to afford.

Happy riding...
Dave-
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Old 12-06-2008, 11:10 AM   #60
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I guess it comes down to finding a local dealer. Testride a bunch of bikes and choose the one I like the best .

Cant wait untill 09 when the dealers here will let me testride again. The weather here is not to good for testriding.
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