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Old 01-18-2009, 08:49 PM   #31
Lobby OP
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I dunno why I'm being so tentative about this. I guess I just don't want to drop the Katoom.

OK. I'll go ramp shopping this week or the next. Perhaps I'll get that $139 device to hold the front wheels to the front of the cab.

Lets see.

I'd still like to see more pics, though.
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Old 01-18-2009, 09:35 PM   #32
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For loading, I find it a thousand times easier to use a double-wide ramp (sort of like this: linky) so I don't feel like I am trying to ride the bike up a tightrope. The guys who have been doing this for decades will tell you to just ride it up a 2x board, but I don't have that kind of confidence.
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Old 01-18-2009, 09:51 PM   #33
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If you are serious about this, a nice, quality ramp is a good investment. The ones pictured in post 28 & 30 both look good. The best ones that I've sampled are the ones with a slight upward bow to them. Your bike is less likely to get high centered when it is half on the ramp and half in the truck. The best one I ever used was a three piece set-up, and each piece folded in half. One wide center section for the bike, with 2 narrower sections one either side for your feet. Each section had safety cables to keep the ramps from slipping off of the tailgate. You could literally ride your bike up into the truck- carefully.

Having grown up on dirt bikes, we always just rode them up into trucks or onto trailers. Often with nothing more fancy than a 2" x 8". After you've done it a few times, it's no big deal. Of course, I've also seen people crater the cab, blow out rear windows, spit the ramp out, and / or fall completely out of the truck.

Being able to back up to any sort of hill or incline makes it much, much easier to load by yourself. The object is to get the ramp as level as you can with the bed, and then coast downhill into the truck.
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Old 01-18-2009, 09:56 PM   #34
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I have a piece of plywood with two 2x4s on it - one on either side of the tire to keep wheels from slipping out and then some simple straps to keep the bike upright.


Oh yeah... you don't need a big truck to haul a GS!
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Old 01-18-2009, 10:45 PM   #35
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I always use a bungy cord hooked to the top and botton hooks of the tie downs. That way if the forks compress the tie downs will tighten up and the hooks won't come unhooked from your bars or bed.
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Old 01-19-2009, 01:43 AM   #36
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Always a good idea to secure the ramp to the truck/trailer with a tie-down or something before loading/unloading. Dropping the bike, you and the ramp all at once when the ramp slips off the edge can be embarrassing.
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Old 01-19-2009, 03:56 AM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LoFlow
I always use a bungy cord hooked to the top and botton hooks of the tie downs. That way if the forks compress the tie downs will tighten up and the hooks won't come unhooked from your bars or bed.
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Old 01-19-2009, 05:58 AM   #38
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Leo, this thread has useful and scary info (note post number 31 in particular) : Riding into the bed of a pickup

Are you planning on doing this for the Big Bend trip? How about you just borrow my trailer? You could tote my Sherpa on the trailer too, then I can ride my Wee out there.
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Old 01-19-2009, 06:22 AM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lobby
Folks,

Say you want to transport a GS sized bike in the back of your pickup truck. How would you do that?

My pickup has a 79 inch (6.56 feet, 200 cm) bed length. The total length of my bike is about 8 feet (244 cm).

How do you tie it down? Do you use a front wheel chock?

Any advice / pictures is appreciated.
As bobcat noted, there is both good advice and scary opinion among the answers.

With a view to center of gravity and the mass of the load, and to stress on the frame components of the bike while loaded, I am a proponent of a straight on tie down rather than angling the bike in.

If the length of the truck bed is a prohibitive issue, simply leave the tail gate down to get the length you need. Measure from the front edge of the front tire to the back edge of the contact patch on the rear tire to get an accurate take on the absolute minimum length you can get by with.

Without a foot or chock, the key to keeping the front wheel from tuning in a straight on tie-down is the put equal tension on the L and R side of the forks.

If you have the saw and other tools to construct a plywood and 2x foot that will add a bit of stability.

I have ridden my bikes -- including the Gold Wing I presently ride, onto several different types of trailers. There is a definite pucker factor to address.

It is by far safer to have a couple of buddies help roll the bike up with steadying hands, but that is not always possible. So if you elect to ride it up, be sure and wear your helmet, be sure the engine is warm, and the mentally prepare for the yawing action of the truck suspension. Speed, timing, and balance are the chief issues to balancing the act.

So good luck on that first load. And if you have a buddy with a video cam, have him shoot a video to post for posterity!
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Old 01-19-2009, 06:24 AM   #40
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anybody have any luck with these?:
http://www.versahaul.com/
http://www.joehauler.com/

seems to me if you're worried about putting it in your truck bed, maybe this is worth looking into. just my $.02. I also can't figure out why you all don't use wheel chocks. what am I missing?
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Old 01-19-2009, 07:09 AM   #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VonHelm
...

Having grown up on dirt bikes, we always just rode them up into trucks or onto trailers. Often with nothing more fancy than a 2" x 8". After you've done it a few times, it's no big deal. Of course, I've also seen people crater the cab, blow out rear windows, spit the ramp out, and / or fall completely out of the truck.

Being able to back up to any sort of hill or incline makes it much, much easier to load by yourself. The object is to get the ramp as level as you can with the bed, and then coast downhill into the truck.
Great advice. I use my driveway apron by parking the truck with the wheels in the gutter, this lowers the tailgate by 6" or so. Any time you can lower the target, your push up the ramp will be easier. Get creative and start looking for low places to park the truck and high places to put the bike. Longer ramps help here, too. I used to ride my dirt bikes into an 8-foot bed truck; when I got a 6.5-foot bed, I quit that and started pushing.

One thing not mentioned so far--when putting two bikes in a truck it helps to put a 6x6 block in front of one of the front wheels to prevent the handlebars from fouling each other.

And though I know it works fine, I resist the front-wheel-in-a-corner technique because it looks wa-ay too Harley
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Old 01-19-2009, 12:04 PM   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bucko
And though I know it works fine, I resist the front-wheel-in-a-corner technique because it looks wa-ay too Harley

I've done this with smaller bikes, if it means that I can get the tailgate closed.

It also helps to have all your tie-down straps securely hooked to the truck, before you begin, and a helper to hand the loose end up to you, so you can get the bike somewhat secured while you're still straddling it. If you're using soft hooks, you can put those in place on the bike before you load it, providing they don't get fouled up in any moving parts.
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VonHelm screwed with this post 01-19-2009 at 12:10 PM
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Old 01-19-2009, 01:21 PM   #43
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Neither of those but I do use this one made by Sarge Industries.

I use it for my dirt bike. Rated for 500# I might try a KLR650 on it but wouldn't even consider it for a GS sized bike which the OP asked about.

They are handy though.



Quote:
Originally Posted by gator_motorrad
anybody have any luck with these?:
http://www.versahaul.com/
http://www.joehauler.com/

seems to me if you're worried about putting it in your truck bed, maybe this is worth looking into. just my $.02. I also can't figure out why you all don't use wheel chocks. what am I missing?
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Old 01-19-2009, 01:36 PM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gator_motorrad
I also can't figure out why you all don't use wheel chocks. what am I missing?
Having hauled a few bikes, I've never seen the need.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Lobby
So, uh, how do you guys get the bikes up to the bed?
I usually load the bike myself, with no help. I use two folding ATV ramps. One centered, and one to the side. I start the bike, warm it up, then line it up with the center ramp, meaning I make sure both wheels are going to hit the ramp. then I back off about a foot from the ramp, and fast walk it up the ramp with the motor pulling the bike.


A trick I use for getting the bike out of the bed is, with the motor off, I put the bike in first gear. Then as i back it off the bed, I can use the clutch as though it were a rear brake.
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Old 01-19-2009, 01:53 PM   #45
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Forget those leg breaking ramps, use one of these...a girl can even do it.

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