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Old 02-13-2009, 03:02 PM   #91
CodyY
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cousin Jack Goudger
Perhaps I do it too simple:

1.) get yourself a $2500 4X4 pick up.....
2.) build yourself a $50 ramp (3ea 2X10X8' pressure treated timbers; 8' of 2X4 pressure treated board, cut into 2' lengths; handful of nuts and bolts)....
3.) buy yourself $40 worth of ratcheting straps.....
4.) chain new ramp to old truck's bumper.........
5.) ride son's $4500 bike into $2500 truck....(ride it carefully!).....
6.) strap her in any old way, front wheel mashed against front of bed......
7.) deliver bike to delighted son in Seattle, 2.5 hours away!

Easy-Peasy! Ain't rocket science, kids!
Yeah. You got it ALL figured out.
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Old 02-13-2009, 05:27 PM   #92
ColinDoyle
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JimVonBaden
http://i20.photobucket.com/albums/b2...up-Bikes-1.jpg

Rare bike, only 1500 imported to the US, and mine is the 4th I have owned. It has 9000 miles on it, and is in great shape!
Whoa, yours has all kinds of crazy equipment on it - like mufflers!

I built a screamer pipe after reinstalling the freshly-rebuilt turbo. No wonder the seals blew... have you seen the drain line on these things?

Nice bike, all in all. This one belongs to a friend of mine... I think I'm going to buy it from him.

Colin
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Old 02-13-2009, 06:56 PM   #93
Cousin Jack Goudger
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HayKlr
They let that old truck into seattle?

I am suprised the greenies didnt try to stop you.

Hah! This old truck gets forty greenies to the mile! Actually, I'm a ski patroller (retired school teacher) and the truck usually has an old camper on it....spends most of it's life in the patroller lot at Snoqualmie Pass.... The kid was in a bind, so I tried to help him out... the bike rode in the old truck just fine. Errmm, btw, anybody wanna buy a ramp?
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Old 02-15-2009, 06:29 AM   #94
rifflebox
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Too Tall!

I've used a Bed Buddy in the front (great for tie-down points also) and an ATV ramp with a "catwalk" to load bikes into the Dodge 2500. The Dodge is so high it is a real pain. I stepped off the catwalk at DVD '09 and almost broke a leg. Fortunately, a couple of buds were helping and they caught me and the bike.


For a single bike I use a Versahauler trailer hitch rack that sits sideways to the bed. It is MUCH easier to load and has its own ramp. I can put my XR650L on the Versahauler by myself without any problem. It leaves the entire bed of the pickup available for gear.

This web site has a description of the Versahauler. I did not buy mine from them but it looks like they have a good selection.

http://www.discountramps.com/motorcycle_carrier.htm
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Old 02-15-2009, 10:24 AM   #95
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When I worked part-time at BMW I saw one of the mechs tearing into a 12GS. I asked what he was fixing. It was the tranny and it had broken bolts on it.

Oh, why? Because the owner hauled his bike in his truck on the centerstand. The stress eventually broke the mounting bolts.

Don't haul bikes on their stands!

Use the suspension, it's what it's designed for, to suspend the bike, whether being ridden or strapped down.
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Old 05-09-2009, 10:31 PM   #96
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So how'd it go, Leo?
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Old 05-10-2009, 09:33 PM   #97
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack90210
So how'd it go, Leo?

I don't trailer, dood.



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Old 05-11-2009, 08:08 AM   #98
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lobby
I don't trailer, dood.




He means his wife decided not to go
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Old 05-11-2009, 08:45 AM   #99
HowlingMad
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Seen this one yet? Curious if anyone has used it.



From here.
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Old 05-11-2009, 09:57 AM   #100
kirkmoon
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I use the Baxley adjustable chock. Fits all wheel sizes (with adjustments.) Very well made. Plenty stable despite not being attached to the bed of the truck. I use the one with the narrower feet since you can't get two bikes in side by side with the wider footed one.

If you use a chock you have the added advantage that once you put the front wheel of the bike into the chock it is secure enough that you can attach and tighten you tie downs at leisure. Plus you don't need to use a lot of down force on the tie downs. Their main job is to keep the bike from moving side to side or front to back when the truck is in motion. They don't need to be super tight. This is good for your bike's front suspension components. I never use rear tie downs with this setup and have never had a problem.

I use an 8" folding aluminum ramp, a milk crate, and the bike's engine to get it into the bed. Dirt bikes and race bikes are light and it is easy and safe to load and unload them solo. For a heavy bike like a GS I would strongly recommend using two ramps (one for you and one for the bike) and doing it with another person around in case things get "interesting".
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Old 05-12-2009, 06:18 AM   #101
LuciferMutt
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Don't know if anyone has mentioned this, but it's also a good idea to use some string or extra strap to tie the front brake firmly on after the bike is loaded and secured.

PLEASE get some help like at least one spotter to help you load the bike into the truck even with a double wide ramp. If it tips, not only will you fall off, but the bike could fall on you which could kill you. BE CAREFUL especially if you are uncomfortable with this. If you are really scared just rent a U-haul motorcycle trailer -- incredibly easy to use and tow.
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Old 05-12-2009, 08:07 AM   #102
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DevilNinjaDog
Don't know if anyone has mentioned this, but it's also a good idea to use some string or extra strap to tie the front brake firmly on after the bike is loaded and secured.

PLEASE get some help like at least one spotter to help you load the bike into the truck even with a double wide ramp. If it tips, not only will you fall off, but the bike could fall on you which could kill you. BE CAREFUL especially if you are uncomfortable with this. If you are really scared just rent a U-haul motorcycle trailer -- incredibly easy to use and tow.

Now what good is the brake going to do? If the bike is loose enough that the straps can't hold it, the front brake isn't going to do anything.

I also don't understand the need for a chock. Just leave the bike on the side stand. Hook up the left strap with some slack in it, then sinch down on the right strap. The bike will stand up off the side stand on it's own, and once you get used to your bike you can leave just the right amount of slack in the left strap so the bike will stand perfectly strait up.

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Old 05-12-2009, 08:56 AM   #103
kirkmoon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gramps
I also don't understand the need for a chock.
Certainly not necessary. But I've hauled a lot of bikes (dirt, street, race) in the back of my truck and have tried all of the various techniques described in this thread and know their advantages and disadvantages.

I've also seen the failure modes of the various options and I can tell you that a chock (or equivalent blocking device, like the "Bed Buddy", attached to the front of the truck bed where the wheels contact the bed wall) eliminates most of them. It completely prevents the front wheel from turning regardless of how rough the road is. It allows you to use less down force on the tie downs. It greatly simplifies the tie down process, particularly if you are working alone. Doubly so if you are loading more than one bike.

Doesn't take up much room. Makes life simpler. Eliminates most of the problems associated with other options. If your bed is long enough that losing a couple of inches up front isn't an issue, there really is no down side to using one that I can think of (except for the cost of the chock.)
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Old 05-12-2009, 09:28 PM   #104
CodyY
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kirkmoon
Certainly not necessary. But I've hauled a lot of bikes (dirt, street, race) in the back of my truck and have tried all of the various techniques described in this thread and know their advantages and disadvantages.

I've also seen the failure modes of the various options and I can tell you that a chock (or equivalent blocking device, like the "Bed Buddy", attached to the front of the truck bed where the wheels contact the bed wall) eliminates most of them. It completely prevents the front wheel from turning regardless of how rough the road is. It allows you to use less down force on the tie downs. It greatly simplifies the tie down process, particularly if you are working alone. Doubly so if you are loading more than one bike.

Doesn't take up much room. Makes life simpler. Eliminates most of the problems associated with other options. If your bed is long enough that losing a couple of inches up front isn't an issue, there really is no down side to using one that I can think of (except for the cost of the chock.)
I totally agree. Keeping the front wheel locked in position is key to the bike's stability. It also keeps you from bending the front of the bed.

Like i stated earlier in this thread; i've had two wrecks with the bike in the truck. W/O the chock the bike fell over. With the chock it never moved.
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Old 05-12-2009, 09:39 PM   #105
dwayne
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gramps
Now what good is the brake going to do? If the bike is loose enough that the straps can't hold it, the front brake isn't going to do anything.

I also don't understand the need for a chock. Just leave the bike on the side stand. Hook up the left strap with some slack in it, then sinch down on the right strap. The bike will stand up off the side stand on it's own, and once you get used to your bike you can leave just the right amount of slack in the left strap so the bike will stand perfectly strait up.

probably stating the obvious...

remember to put your sidestand up. You might wind up nothing happening or a dent in the bed to breaking the bike.
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