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Old 02-26-2009, 06:45 AM   #16
DRZ400SK4
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That question really depends on your definition of the word 'dualsport'. I've owned a 650 V-Strom and I put 30,000 kms on it in just 18 months. In my world the DL650 is definitely NOT a dualsport. But it is an exceptionally good 'adventure bike'. Meaning it's great for this kind of thing...



And also this kind of thing...





BUT!!!

I have a bike that I do consider to be a 'dualsport', and it looks like this, and as you can see, it lives in a very different world than the world the DL650 lives in. Ride a DL650 in any of these common 'dualsport' situations, and you'll destroy it within minutes...





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DRZ400SK4 screwed with this post 02-26-2009 at 07:03 AM
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Old 02-26-2009, 06:57 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DRZ400SK4
That question really depends on your definition of 'dualsport'. I've owned a 650 V-Strom and put 30,000 kms on it in just 18 months. In my world the DL650 is definitely NOT a dualsport. But it is an exceptionally good 'adventure bike'.

I have a bike that I do consider to be a 'dualsport', and it looks like this, and as you can see, it lives in a very different world than the DL650 does...





I think we have a winner.
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Old 02-26-2009, 07:44 AM   #18
ENDODB4
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Let's not forget fuel capacity.
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Old 02-26-2009, 07:57 AM   #19
DRZ400SK4
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Let's not forget fuel capacity.
Exactly...

Adventure bikes have big fuel tank capacity, and dualsports don't.

Dualsports also don't have a sportbike-style paper air filter element under the fuel tank. They have washable, easy access oiled-foam air filters.

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Old 02-26-2009, 11:53 AM   #20
chiefrider
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Aw, I get this all the time....

....folks look at my old R100GSPD as ask if it's a DIRT BIKE. Sure, it has a high front fender and TKC80 knobbies.

I have to answer, NOT REALLY.

I explain it's a touring bike that can handle gravel or roads in poor condition. But I don't try to make her go off road.

I wouldn't go off-road with a V-Strom. Gravel roads, yes.

Like someone already said, DUAL SPORT is a general marketing term, kind of like what folks called an "enduro" back in the late 1960's.

My $0.02

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Old 02-26-2009, 01:13 PM   #21
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I don't know why but I hate the term adventure touring. Isn't the reason we all ride bikes regardless of type is for the "adventure"? It almost become a marketing word like extreme.

The GS and Stroms are not true dual sports by any means. They are road bikes, not street bikes but ROAD bikes. Pavement, Gravel ROADs, Forest service ROADs, old abondoned 2-track ROADs.

We all know this class of bike is analogous to SUV's.

At one end you have the off road based Jeep Charokee with it's solid front axel (KTM 950) that will get you most anywhere and is designed for better performace off the pavement.

Then there's the Chevy Tahoe (GS or V-Strom) a hiway based design, but rugged enought to supprise many people when it is taken off the pavement.

Then there's the cross overs with thier car based chassis and Suburus (Versys, Uly, Multistrada) that will get by on a gravel road, but as soon as you start seeing ruts and need the properties of a real truck it's time to turn around.

But at the end of it all It's the oporator that makes the difference. I've seen Suburus in some crazy spots and we all know only .05% of all Hummers sold actually leave the pavement.

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Old 02-26-2009, 01:31 PM   #22
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Old 02-26-2009, 02:18 PM   #23
DarinB
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No. It's a standard street bike that people take off road.
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Old 02-26-2009, 06:59 PM   #24
Desertbilly
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The problem with this discussion, and it's been going on for many years, is that there's no universal definition of 'dual sport' or 'off road'. Obviously, there's a continuum of road conditions from hard-packed dirt to tight, muddy single-track through a forest.

One thing I think a lot of people don't get about the west is how much public land we have out here, most of which is criss-crossed by gravel and dirt roads (in addition to the tigher stuff). So out here in the wild west, a GS or Strom with TKC-80's is really a lot of fun, and there's a tremendous amount of roads a novice rider can cover it in.

Would I recommend climbing tight, sandy hills on one? Of course not, but there's still thousands of miles of gravel/dirt roads and jeep trails you can do out here on heavy 'dual-sports.'

Ultimately, as in every class of motorcycling, the rider should decide what they want to do, and buy the best ride for them. If that's a GS or Strom, great. Or a 950. Or one of the great 650's, or a 510/450, or a 400, or a 250. They all have pro's and con's. They're all better at some things than other things.

That doesn't mean the bikes that aren't right for you are bad bikes.

I had an 02 Strom for 2 years, with Anakees. It was a great bike but it didn't do everything. I have an 07 GS Adv now with TKC80s, and it's a great bike, but it also doesn't do everything.

People trying to assert that X bike is good and Y bike is bad need to realize that different bikes work for different people. There is no, and never will be, an objective 'best bike'. All that matters is what is the best bike for them.
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Old 02-26-2009, 07:00 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jsb223
It's a street bike very capable of handling poorly constructed or minimally maintained roads..
That's pretty close.

I took mine to Prudhoe Bay, Southen Utah and several
unimproved road areas. I'll never believe big bores are much
good for aggresive off road. Not saying they can't, but why?









Very comfortable on the street. Nice affordable
all rounder motorcycle.
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Old 02-26-2009, 07:18 PM   #26
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Those are some fine pics guys. Alaska looks awesome, but two wheels in snow and ice freaks me just thinking about it.

I have a friend who has had just about every kind of bike and the Wee Strom he got lately has him raving about it.

Dual Purpose, Adv. Tourer whatever, they seem to like or tolerate "bad" roads real well and are comfy on the long haul handling very well all the while.
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Old 02-27-2009, 04:36 AM   #27
DRZ400SK4
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There was a guy who rode around the world, off road, on an R1. But I don't think any of us would conclude that an R1 is a dualspot bike, just because you 'can' ride one around the world, off road.

I feel sorry for the newbies who see Suzuki's marketing, and maybe think that a DL650 will do for them what a DRZ400 does, because Suzuki sticks both bikes in their 'dualsport' category.

Up until this year, at least Suzuki of Canada had the good sense to put the Stroms in their 'streetbikes' category. But I see this year they've followed the US example.
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Old 02-27-2009, 04:38 AM   #28
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I thought dual sport meant you could ride it to football or baseball games?
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Old 02-27-2009, 05:15 AM   #29
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Any motorcycle can be a dual sport, it's up to the rider to take it through the courses.

There is higher probability that a dual sport moto would get dumpped more often then say a 400cc enduro, if you like picking up a heavier moto like a V-strom or GS, they can be taken anywhere a 400cc enduro could.

Oh, and it is likely that V-Strom would cost more to repair after a dump.

If you ask me, I'd ride a more nimble machine with better/more suspension for dual sport type riding than a V-Strom. I like to ride (not pick up) a bike.
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Old 02-27-2009, 06:36 AM   #30
Skippii
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cat0020
Any motorcycle can be a dual sport, it's up to the rider to take it through the courses.

There is higher probability that a dual sport moto would get dumpped more often then say a 400cc enduro, if you like picking up a heavier moto like a V-strom or GS, they can be taken anywhere a 400cc enduro could.

Oh, and it is likely that V-Strom would cost more to repair after a dump.

If you ask me, I'd ride a more nimble machine with better/more suspension for dual sport type riding than a V-Strom. I like to ride (not pick up) a bike.
I like picking up my DL1K.

I also like riding for an hour at a very spirited pace on the twisties in order to get to good dirt.
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