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Old 05-20-2009, 09:25 PM   #31
GTomic
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Infracaninophile
Not a motorhome but my wife and I bought this recently to use around the west. It's very comfortable inside with a stove, fridge, and furnace. Double bed. Weighs 1000 lbs. Tows very easily. It's a 1982 Burro 13'.

Just got done replacing the tires (175/80 13") and wheel bearings and have begun to use it. Works great. Just add a 10x10' EZ Up, some camp chairs, and booze and you're all set.



Tom

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Old 05-20-2009, 09:28 PM   #32
xshanex
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I've been looking for a tiny one like that and the fiberglass ones go for some decent coin! I'm looking for a half decent 50's-70's 13"-16" little trailer and missed out on a couple of awesome ones already


Quote:
Originally Posted by Infracaninophile
Not a motorhome but my wife and I bought this recently to use around the west. It's very comfortable inside with a stove, fridge, and furnace. Double bed. Weighs 1000 lbs. Tows very easily. It's a 1982 Burro 13'.

Just got done replacing the tires (175/80 13") and wheel bearings and have begun to use it. Works great. Just add a 10x10' EZ Up, some camp chairs, and booze and you're all set.



Tom
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Old 05-20-2009, 09:32 PM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Infracaninophile
Not a motorhome but my wife and I bought this recently to use around the west. It's very comfortable inside with a stove, fridge, and furnace. Double bed. Weighs 1000 lbs. Tows very easily. It's a 1982 Burro 13'.

Just got done replacing the tires (175/80 13") and wheel bearings and have begun to use it. Works great. Just add a 10x10' EZ Up, some camp chairs, and booze and you're all set.



Tom
Those things are awesome.
And expensive.
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Old 05-20-2009, 09:45 PM   #34
Donkey Hotey
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If you even think about an old motorhome, you need to stick to riveted aluminum coaches: Revcon, Airstream or one of the bus conversions. The problem with everything else is they are basically garden sheds built on a truck chassis. That aluminum siding is sealed with putty that dried out about 20 years ago. They will structurally be leaking, rotting and falling apart by now.

Those early Winnebagos really are a 'classic' in the way that a Pinto is a classic: lots of people had them, which made them iconic. Why did they have them? Because they were cheap pieces of crap.

My Revcon still used a wooden floor but for the most part, the coach is rock solid, leak free and 36 years old. It was actually one of the very first totally self-contained rigs (5kW generator, 2-way fridge, roof air, hot water, etc, etc).


Picture of the interior (if you care).

I absolutely love my Revcon (Front Wheel Drive, handles great and has a lot of innovative features) but if you're looking for a solid performing, overbuilt, self-contained rig on a fairly conventional chassis, I'm going to cast another vote for the Airstream motorhomes of the mid 70s through mid 80s.

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Old 05-20-2009, 10:02 PM   #35
DELTATANGO
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I have a 280 Airstream. It was a basket case when I got it.

I have put a new engine in it. (headers, dual exhaust, aluminum intake, new radiator)

New rear suspension. I got rid of airbags and went back to leaf springs.
All new front suspension with Supercoil custom springs.
New furnace, new water heater
New brakes, new tires
That 455 will run with the quad, headers and glass packs! Too bad it's in a 10,000 pound motor home.

It needs a TV, 4 speed lock up transmission and a decorator.

I can't post pictures for some reason.

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Old 05-20-2009, 10:18 PM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Donkey Hotey
If you even think about an old motorhome, you need to stick to rivited aluminum coaches: Revcon, Airstream or one of the bus conversions. The problem with everything else is they are basically garden sheds built on a truck chassis. That aluminum siding is sealed with putty that dried out about 20 years ago. They will structurally be leaking, rotting and falling apart by now.

Those early Winnebagos really are a 'classic' in the way that a Pinto is a classic: lots of people had them, which made them iconic. Why did they have them? Because they were cheap pieces of crap.

My Revcon still used a wooden floor but for the most part, the coach is rock solid, leak free and 36 years old. It was actually one of the very first totally self-contained rigs (5kW generator, 2-way fridge, roof air, hot water, etc, etc).


Picture of the interior (if you care).

I absolutely love my Revcon (Front Wheel Drive, handles great and has a lot of innovative features) but if you're looking for a solid performing, overbuilt, self-contained rig on a fairly conventional chassis, I'm going to cast another vote for the Airstream motorhomes of the mid 70s through mid 80s.

OH great, thanks allot, I've seen several of those and wondered if the front wheel drive was dependable. after seeing the interior they look awesome.
Great,
Revcon, Overbuilt. Now I gotta start paying attention to those,
Thanks for nothing...
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Old 05-20-2009, 10:56 PM   #37
Donkey Hotey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nwgs
OH great, thanks allot, I've seen several of those and wondered if the front wheel drive was dependable.
I'm sure I've posted this before, but here it is again:

The drivetrain is literally a same-era Olds Toronoado frame & chassis, cut off just below the dashboard. If you look at this photo, you can see the two torsion springs going straight back from the engine to a crossmember about 2 feet behind the trans. That's the end of the Toronado chassis. The rest of the motorhome attaches to that front subframe by 6 bolts. It's essentially a trailer, bolted on top of a Toronado drivetrain.

It's got all of the ups and downs of that drivetrain. You're stuck with either the 455 Olds engine or the 500 Cadillac. A few have swapped to the 500 Caddy. Having owned a number of those Cadillacs, I can tell you the Olds is a better engine.



The spindles have a bit larger flange pressed onto them so they use a larger bolt pattern on the wheels. Other than that, all the steering, suspension and other parts are 100% OEM Toronado parts. The Revcon was the predesessor to the GMC motorhomes of the era. Revcon was doing work at the GM proving grounds in 1969. GM took notice and developed their own motorhome with basically the same underpinnings.

I used to lust for the GMC and I think the exterior styling of the GMC is still nicer than the Revcon. Despite that, the Revcon has a much nicer fit and finish and the interior is much more plush than the GMC. All of the interior cabinetry is exposed teak framing with honeycomb core cabinets.

Another picture, this time of the bedroom. Notice the teak uprights on the cabinets and the sides of the bed parts. The bed on the lower right pulls out into a 'full' bed. There is a 'twin' bunk that is in the stowed position above that. There are overhead lockers all around the coach. It's got central heat that will keep you warm on a 20 degree night with 50 MPH winds (BTDT--desert camping in the winter).

They used the very best components. The original refrigerator, furnace and plumbing is still in the coach. The original water heater died just last year (rotted out just like a house water heater). I had to change the house water pump, the sewer dump valves and a few other things. It's certainly no more than I would have done to a 35 year old house. It's got copper plumbing and ABS sewer lines (just like a house).

As for the engine, it needed all the usual stuff you'd expect on an old car: water & fuel pumps, plugs, wires, belts, cap, rotor, hoses, etc, etc. I went through the brakes, wheel bearings, half-shafts, etc, etc. It's not for the faint of heart. You'd have to do at least as much to the motorhome as you'd expect to do to any vehicle that old, before taking off on a long trip.

Since I've got your attention:

http://spokane.craigslist.org/rvs/1180794539.html
http://reno.craigslist.org/rvs/1178882509.html
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Old 05-20-2009, 10:56 PM   #38
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Motorhome. Makes me think of the movie "The Hills Have Eyes."



That said, my neighbor has one of those little trailers (like the Burro above), and its really cool. Could you pull one with a Burgman?
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Old 05-20-2009, 11:03 PM   #39
Donkey Hotey
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I always thought the Burro was cool. I want to see the inside. Pics please.
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Old 05-20-2009, 11:28 PM   #40
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Me too
1972 Brave w/ mighty mighty dodge 318


My Dad rented one of these in 1975 and we toured the east coast via private coach. I was never the same
30 years later I picked this up in Sierra Vista AZ, because my bike broke down coming out of Mexico and I had no way home.
Runs like a dream, lists like a nightmare.
It's a true time machine with 54k miles and 90% original down to the humming Onan except for the brand new modern frig (PO) and new meats.
Converted the pressure system to modern pump and upgraded the power.

Mostly used by visiting riders as a bunk house but I'm threatening to roll it to DVDaze


Oh yeah, whatever you do don't even think about how cool it would be to tow a vintage boat behind it. . .
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Old 05-21-2009, 05:04 AM   #41
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I have an old Winny Brave sitting in the brush you can have it if you want , Its been there for 25 years or so , needs a little clean up , Bring your chain saw , some trees will have to be trimmed to get it out . The tan and brown bird looks like the one we sold a couple years ago , 82 model 3 built in AC units , full length aluminum deck on top , The name on the front was different and I put LED turnsignals on . It was nice but I did spend a few hours on maintaince . SEYA
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Old 05-21-2009, 05:09 AM   #42
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Not big on motor homes

but I REALLY like these.

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Old 05-21-2009, 05:46 AM   #43
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This is ours. 1976 Executive that my Grandfather bought new. 102k on the odo. The photo was taken less than a month ago in Moab. Traveled down from Idaho with a crew from Happy Trails for a nice getaway. Averaged 7.25 mpg running 65mph the whole way. Dodge M500 chassis with the 440-3 motor. Headers, intake, carb, ignition, cam and some mild headwork.

I must disagree with the common thought that buying a newer coach is somehow more reliable than an older one. Until January I worked in the high end RV industry and my father has a 2004 Monaco Executive 43' rig. He has as many, if not more, component failures than I do. We both have the laundry list of small repairs to do on our rigs year to year. The key is to find an older one that was owned by someone who cared about it.

Ours is perfect. Nothing like dry camping out in the boonies for a week. Getting back from a day of riding, kicking on the generator with a press of the button from inside, cranking the AC to cool her off while I jump in the shower to wash off the days dust. Get out and pull clean clothes from the closet while sipping on a cold beer from the fridge. Screw tent camping.

I have done many things to this coach from year to year. Just part of owning an older coach, but also part of the enjoyment. Just added Firestone air bags all around on the suspension with Bilstein shocks and wow, did that make a huge difference.

A couple of years ago I replaced the older type of water pump for the house with a new Shur-Flo unit and I have water pressure in the shower almost like home. Updated the battery pack to handle extended dry camping and have plans to add a couple of large solar panels to the roof.

This coach does not leak, rattle, shake, smoke, or leave parts on the side of the road. It does require care and upkeep, but if you think a newer coach does not, your kidding yourself. Each time I address some system on the coach, I do what I can to bring it up to modern standards and technology. Hell, I even have a Vorad collision avoidance front and side radar system on it. The same systems they are (were ) putting on the high end Monaco's as of late.

It is due for a new coat of paint, and that is on the list. I have a friend that is a painter and he and I do a lot of trade out so it will not cost me much. We re-did all the upholstery last year and added new captains chairs as well.

If you think that it is an awful lot of money to spend on an old coach I would willingly compare my expenses on a PAID OFF coach with that of one who is making payments on theirs. In the 13 years my wife and I have enjoyed this coach, it has only had one failure that kept it from moving, and that was a starter failed in Seattle. Took me a couple of hours to round up a starter from a local shop and get it installed and be on my way again. When you only use a coach a few weeks a year, why buy one that you have payments on?

I love this rig, and we use it a lot. Packing it up for this weekend as we speak.
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Old 05-21-2009, 06:36 AM   #44
Infracaninophile
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Donkey Hotey
I always thought the Burro was cool. I want to see the inside. Pics please.
Will do in a few days. Have it apart a bit as I integrate a new 12v wiring fuse block I got at West Marine. Am adding a few new 12v lights and new vinyl flooring to replace the PO's "leopard print" flooring. The fiberglass RV's (Burro (out of business now), Casita, and Scamp can all be found on www.fiberglassrv.com) have what is basically a boat "hull". That means there is an inner and outer fiberglass surface with insulation in between. The interior of my Burro is white, gel-coat shiny fiberglass. Very warm and light.

Again, my 13' Burro weighs about 1000 lbs empty. I have a 12 gallon fresh water tank. No bathroom so no grey or black water tanks. Water from the sink goes out the side into a hose or bucket in a campground. I plan to only dry camp in the wild. Got a new Honda EU2000i generator for making 110v power. 12V power is now a single Blue-Top Optima battery. Going to add a 2nd one of these soon to extend camping for cold weather when the furnace pulls 12v.

Pics soon. Don't want to mess up the OP's thread.





Tom

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Old 05-21-2009, 06:48 AM   #45
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i'm a travel trailer junkie...
anything vintage and under 25' gets me lookin and thinkin


headin out tommorrow in our 13' canned ham
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