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Old 10-15-2014, 11:01 AM   #1
dmmcd OP
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How far on a flat tire?

I was riding home from work last week when I got a flat rear tire. I was 6 miles from home. I was late as always. Rather than stop and call for help, I decided to keep going. As long as I didn't lean the bike over too far, the rim would ride on the bead and no damage was done to the rim. I did this once before on my old bike. Handling wasn't too bad, as long as I was going straight.

Has anyone else done this?

***Definitely not recommended. Don't try this at home. Dangerous and unsafe.***
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Old 10-15-2014, 11:11 AM   #2
markjenn
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I don't know if there are any hard/fast rules about this.

I recently had a rear flat on my sportbike while on a gravel road about 2 miles from pavement. I rode it flat to pavement and attempted to fix it, but couldn't find the hole. The nearest town was about 10 miles away and I rode it there, repeatedly pumping the tire up to 10 psi or so (all it would hold) and then riding for a couple miles until it went flat again. The tire was blisteringly hot and I couldn't even touch it for 30 minutes or so. With shop air and lots of water, I eventually found the gravel puncture gash, plugged it, and rode the bike 400 miles home . The tire seemed to work fine, but, of course, I replaced it, both because of the plug and because I'm sure the extreme heat did the tire structure no good.

I would never recommend one ride a flat tire any longer than necessary, but by the same token, you've got to do what you've got to do to extricate yourself from a bad situation. Tires are tough and can stand a lot of abuse.

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Old 10-15-2014, 12:18 PM   #3
MudNation
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I rolled the bead and tore the stem off my KLX 250 15 miles from home. Road her home in terrible NJ traffic. The bike constantly pulled right. You couldn't put any power down or it would pull harder. Leaning was a no-no and anything over 25mph was piss your pants scary. Made it back alive though. Still running that tire.
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Old 10-15-2014, 12:50 PM   #4
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A flat on a tubed tire is a whole different ballgame than tubeless. Have a tire debead (as tends to happen with flatted tubed tires) and loss-of-control is an immediate concern. Main reason why tubeless is considered a lot safer.

- Mark
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Old 10-15-2014, 01:00 PM   #5
Maggot12
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I had countless flats on cars and 4 on motorcycles. All instances I pull off as quickly and safe as practical to do so. Motorycle say 1/4km-1/8 mile at most and once about 50ft.

Take the 5 minutes, plug the tire and ride/drive off. I have a compressor and plug kit in every vehicle I've ever owned


I've never had to be anywhere to jeopardize that much safety.
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Old 10-15-2014, 01:08 PM   #6
aldend123
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It depends on whether I want to fix the problem and continue to use the tire, or is it coming off anyway? If I want to reuse it, enough to clear the roadway and that's it.
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Old 10-15-2014, 01:21 PM   #7
little foot
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yep, roughly 8 miles and 5 of it gravel. I stood on the pegs the whole way thinking I was keeping some of the weight off of the back tire.
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Old 10-15-2014, 02:14 PM   #8
dmmcd OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markjenn View Post
A flat on a tubed tire is a whole different ballgame than tubeless. Have a tire debead (as tends to happen with flatted tubed tires) and loss-of-control is an immediate concern. Main reason why tubeless is considered a lot safer.

- Mark
I run a tube in a tubeless tire, so best of both worlds...

I ride on the street 99% of the time, and it doesn't happen often. I've plugged tires before (tubeless) without problems, but I don't carry a full tool kit or spare tube with me during my daily commute. I do have the AMA roadside assistance, but by the time someone showed up I could have probably walked the bike the 6 miles home.
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Old 10-16-2014, 05:30 AM   #9
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I've never been able to ride on a flat tube type tire as they just flop around on the rim. Rode 25+ miles on a flat front tubeless Dunlop 491.
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Old 10-16-2014, 05:46 AM   #10
gearheadE30
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Yeah, tube tires you're not going to make it far. I've ridden a little ways on a flat rear on a dirt bike, but that's it. The 950 always has a spare front tube, small pump, and some small tire irons stashed somewhere just in case, since I have really bad luck getting flat tires on that.
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Old 10-16-2014, 06:34 AM   #11
PFFOG
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Rode over 10 miles on a flat rear on a rented f800gs (rim has ribs for tubeless) last year in California. I was headed to a dealer to get the tire changed when it went flat about 20 miles out. They sent a truck, and I nursed it along at about 20 mph until we meet about 1/2 way. No leaning had to slow and steer to navigate corners.

Not really too bad,really. But don't want to make a habit of having flats.
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Old 10-16-2014, 06:44 AM   #12
falcn
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TO THE ENDS OF THE EARTH!


Doesn't anyone carry little bottle of Slime for the tubes? I carry them with a pump. Used Slime ALL the time on my mountain bikes.
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Old 10-16-2014, 06:52 AM   #13
PFFOG
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Quote:
Originally Posted by falcn View Post
TO THE ENDS OF THE EARTH!


Doesn't anyone carry little bottle of Slime for the tubes? I carry them with a pump. Used Slime ALL the time on my mountain bikes.
I was with a couple other guys, and rather that all carry stuff, one of the others had it. However I was riding alone to get the tire replaced, and was set to meet them later in the day. Murphy's law!

On my own bike I have sealed the spokes, and carry puncture repair and inflation equipment.

I have heard good and bad about slime and its ability to seal a tube puncture.
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Old 10-16-2014, 08:01 AM   #14
falcn
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PFFOG View Post
I was with a couple other guys, and rather that all carry stuff, one of the others had it. However I was riding alone to get the tire replaced, and was set to meet them later in the day. Murphy's law!

On my own bike I have sealed the spokes, and carry puncture repair and inflation equipment.

I have heard good and bad about slime and its ability to seal a tube puncture.
I've never had it fail me yet on pinch flats or thorns.
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Old 10-16-2014, 10:24 AM   #15
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I had a pinch flat on a tubeless tire with a tube in it on my TU250, shinko 712, the shop that installed the tire must have got the tube between the rim and the tire.
I rode home 15 miles at speeds up to 50 mph with the back tire flat, no harm to the rim or tire, that tire is still on the bike 9000 miles later.
The bike handled ok and the bead did not come off, those tires are TOUGH, which is why I had the shop put it on, no way I was doing it with tire irons!

Tube type tires can be very wimpy, and not work at all when flat.
They are easy to remove and get back on, but no way you are going far on a flat one.
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