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Old 07-19-2009, 05:41 PM   #91
CodeMonkee OP
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Back to the whhoo sa burger thingy.

Last night I tried to put the 12 tooth front sprocket on in anticipation of riding trails today. Didn't work. The chain is too long.

As has been reported by many owners, it seems Husaberg purposely installs a chain that is max length to work with the stock gearing at max adjustment (as far to the rear as you can). Probably so you can pick larger sprockets.

I put the 13 back on, lowered the idle by about 400 to 500 RPM - just enough so the bike idles without laboring while in neutral - and I safety wired the spark arrestor.

Then I went riding out at Machias today. I did twice as much or more tight technical track with lots of ups and downs and such. I am getting a bit better and in a bit better shape. It helped that it wasn't so hot today, but it was still pretty warm in my street gear. I gotta get some dirt gear ordered/bought.

Anyway, the bike did real well with the lowered idle. I stalled it a few times, but always when you would expect me to stall it.

I am convinced now I am going to do several things:

1) Get a larger rear sprocket, something in the range of 54 to 56 teeth, probably the latter. I really want to go over this tech stuff much slower and take my time. A good rider would have no problems, but I like to take my time and rather than race through this stuff. Even with a lot of clutch work I am going through it too fast, not having the time to pick and choose. Half the time I am having the bike make the choices for me and I don't learn and get better that way.

If I need to go back up in gearing I can always get a 14 or even 15 tooth sprocket. But right now it isn't low enough and I don't care about the 5 to 10 MPH I will lose on the top end - there is plenty there in 6th anyway and I don't ride the bike on the road for long distances.

2) I am getting a Rekluse. Even with lower gearing there will be times when I just want to or have to stop or go so slow that I would have to do a lot of clutch work. Also, there are times when I don't want to stall. The bike is the most resistant to stalling bike I can remember having ridden, but you can still stall it. I think with the Rekluse I can concentrate on the riding and less on the clutch work.
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Old 07-20-2009, 01:44 AM   #92
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The Rekluse auto-clutches are awesome. I have one on my KTM990S and Aprilia RXV550 and it really saves your clutch hand in the tight stuff, plus you'll rarely if ever stall the bike, even in the tightest trails and rocks. The Rekluse made my light flywheel high-strung and stall-prone RXV into a much more fun ride offroad. It never stalls and hillclimbs are more fun, no feathering needed.

Keep in mind if you do get a Rekluse, you can no longer push start the bike, but that 'Berg is a quick start anyway with EFI. I rode the '09 FE's at a Tasky's Demo Day and I was lusting for one afterwards, just have too many bikes in the garage already...

I was out at Machias on Saturday on my RXV and once before on the WR250R. I ride them out there, no trailering for me on the close local areas.
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Old 07-20-2009, 04:19 AM   #93
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Originally Posted by cyborg
The Rekluse auto-clutches are awesome. I have one on my KTM990S and Aprilia RXV550 and it really saves your clutch hand in the tight stuff, plus you'll rarely if ever stall the bike, even in the tightest trails and rocks. The Rekluse made my light flywheel high-strung and stall-prone RXV into a much more fun ride offroad. It never stalls and hillclimbs are more fun, no feathering needed.

Keep in mind if you do get a Rekluse, you can no longer push start the bike, but that 'Berg is a quick start anyway with EFI. I rode the '09 FE's at a Tasky's Demo Day and I was lusting for one afterwards, just have too many bikes in the garage already...

I was out at Machias on Saturday on my RXV and once before on the WR250R. I ride them out there, no trailering for me on the close local areas.
It makes me a little nervous that I won't be able to bump start it - at least not without taking the cover off and cinching down the clutch - but the reality is that it is an e-start/EFI/ECU bike. If the battery goes dead bump starting won't help.

If the battery just doesn't have the juice to quite start it (like my Ducati has been doing lately), then bump starting would be helpful, but in that case I usually have some warning. The only real situation I think could happen would be if I dropped it in a water crossing and had to crank it for a while.

The other half of reality is that much of the time there is not a nice long hill handy you can use to bump start the bike. Only if you are riding with a buddy with a tow strap and you have some decent road to try on is bump starting going to work. I don't think I will have any problems - I hope I won't because I will be putting a lot of trust in a bike/system that is going to eventually be taking me deep into the boonies, not just a few miles into an ORV park.
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Old 07-20-2009, 04:33 AM   #94
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One more thing before I forget.

No brake light switch on the front brake!

Since I use mostly the front brake on the street (proper use and the rear locks up all to easy anyway), this is somewhat dangerous as cars behind me have no clue that I am slowing - making them even more clueless than they already are.

I guess I am going to have to find something to remedy this. Unless I am missing something, I think this is a glaring oversight by Husaberg!
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Old 07-20-2009, 05:03 AM   #95
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CodeMonkee
One more thing before I forget.

No brake light switch on the front brake!

Since I use mostly the front brake on the street (proper use and the rear locks up all to easy anyway), this is somewhat dangerous as cars behind me have no clue that I am slowing - making them even more clueless than they already are.

I guess I am going to have to find something to remedy this. Unless I am missing something, I think this is a glaring oversight by Husaberg!
The master cylinder from an EXC would work, maybe you can adapt just the brake light switch to yours. I can post a picture later of what it looks like.

Alternatively - probably the cheapes/best solution - would be to get a bolt that goes through the banjo into the MC with a built in hydraulic switch. I think DRC carries them in their product line, as do others.
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Old 07-20-2009, 05:49 AM   #96
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CodeMonkee
One more thing before I forget.

No brake light switch on the front brake!

Since I use mostly the front brake on the street (proper use and the rear locks up all to easy anyway), this is somewhat dangerous as cars behind me have no clue that I am slowing - making them even more clueless than they already are.

I guess I am going to have to find something to remedy this. Unless I am missing something, I think this is a glaring oversight by Husaberg!
you are simply missing a brake light switch. there are two options:

1) use the same pressure switch on the front as you do on the rear
2) source the mechanical switch that is made for KTM front brakes

both work fine and plug right into the harness. I use option 1 on my 'berg.
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Old 07-20-2009, 11:53 AM   #97
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CodeMonkee
It makes me a little nervous that I won't be able to bump start it - at least not without taking the cover off and cinching down the clutch - but the reality is that it is an e-start/EFI/ECU bike. If the battery goes dead bump starting won't help.

If the battery just doesn't have the juice to quite start it (like my Ducati has been doing lately), then bump starting would be helpful, but in that case I usually have some warning. The only real situation I think could happen would be if I dropped it in a water crossing and had to crank it for a while.

The other half of reality is that much of the time there is not a nice long hill handy you can use to bump start the bike. Only if you are riding with a buddy with a tow strap and you have some decent road to try on is bump starting going to work. I don't think I will have any problems - I hope I won't because I will be putting a lot of trust in a bike/system that is going to eventually be taking me deep into the boonies, not just a few miles into an ORV park.
Go for the Rekluse My RXV has no kickstart lever either but I've never hesitated to take it to remote spots offroad. EFI makes them very dependable starters, and like you said, very dependant on a good battery. I DO carry a small set of lightweight motorcycle jumper cables on long trips. Can come in handy if you kill the battery by leaving a gadget on, on your bike, if you ever install any... my RXV is street legal and has all the lights, blinkers and switchgear and wired for Gerbing heated vest and Garmin 276C GPS power (340W alternator). Most dirtbikes are button start now so even if you can't push or tow start, you can ask for a jump!
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Old 07-20-2009, 06:52 PM   #98
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cyborg
Go for the Rekluse My RXV has no kickstart lever either but I've never hesitated to take it to remote spots offroad. EFI makes them very dependable starters, and like you said, very dependant on a good battery. I DO carry a small set of lightweight motorcycle jumper cables on long trips. Can come in handy if you kill the battery by leaving a gadget on, on your bike, if you ever install any... my RXV is street legal and has all the lights, blinkers and switchgear and wired for Gerbing heated vest and Garmin 276C GPS power (340W alternator). Most dirtbikes are button start now so even if you can't push or tow start, you can ask for a jump!
Well, there is nothing to leave on with the FE570 - a button to start it, a button to stop it, that's it. The lights come on and go off automagically like most bikes nowadays, but there is no ignition switch so they are only on when the bike runs. I suppose whatever controls the lights could go fubar, but I think I would notice, and there is a switch to turn them completely off which is nice if you have to extend your battery because your charging system is fubar.

I think about the only thing electrical I will add to the Husaberg will be a voltmeter so I can get early warning if the battery isn't being charged like it should be, or it isn't holding a charge - the latter usually comes gradually, but without a voltmeter you may not notice until too late. As for the charging system, I have had more than one suddenly go bad, but if I had warning (the system voltage drops below 13+ volts while running at speed), I could have diverted to a repair shop instead of just going blissfully on my way until stuff started to not work anymore.

I don't need backup lights because I rarely, rarely, rarely ride at night. I don't need a vest because I don't ride when it is cold.

A lot of people will not get a dirt bike without a kick start, but they will drive a 4x4 into the boonies and those don't have kick starts (although I still won't buy one with an auto trans).
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Old 07-21-2009, 07:21 AM   #99
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CodeMonkee
I think about the only thing electrical I will add to the Husaberg will be a voltmeter so I can get early warning if the battery isn't being charged like it should be, or it isn't holding a charge - the latter usually comes gradually, but without a voltmeter you may not notice until too late. As for the charging system, I have had more than one suddenly go bad, but if I had warning (the system voltage drops below 13+ volts while running at speed), I could have diverted to a repair shop instead of just going blissfully on my way until stuff started to not work anymore.


http://www.customdynamics.com/LED_ba...anel_Mount_LED

stash the small (about 1/2 a mini-DV tape sized) control box and mount the single dual-color LED wherever you can see it. It indicates battery charge state as follows:

Flashing Green - Above 15.25V DC
Steady Green - Above 12.9V DC
Steady Amber - Above 12.6V DC
Steady Red - Above 12.1V DC
Flashing Red - Below 12V DDC

I've got them on most of the bikes in our garage and have one to install on my 'berg.
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Old 07-21-2009, 10:54 AM   #100
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Originally Posted by (sp?)


http://www.customdynamics.com/LED_ba...anel_Mount_LED

stash the small (about 1/2 a mini-DV tape sized) control box and mount the single dual-color LED wherever you can see it. It indicates battery charge state as follows:

Flashing Green - Above 15.25V DC
Steady Green - Above 12.9V DC
Steady Amber - Above 12.6V DC
Steady Red - Above 12.1V DC
Flashing Red - Below 12V DDC

I've got them on most of the bikes in our garage and have one to install on my 'berg.
Hey =(sp?), that's a cool part! I'm going to get a couple.

In the past I used small LCD voltmeters (EMV1200) but they weren't as waterproof as I would have liked, I had to waterproof them more by taking apart and sealing with RTV. Sample rate is too high as well, so the display bounces around a bit too.

http://www.alliedelec.com/Search/Pro...02&MPN=EMV1200



Voltmeters are great indicators if your charging system is failing or you are overloading your charging system with things like heated vests and grips. On my DRZ400S (sold) I had a switch to turn off the headlight so I could run the heated vest. I do ride all year round. The RXV has enough watts that power management isn't typically needed.

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Old 07-21-2009, 04:51 PM   #101
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Originally Posted by cyborg
Hey =(sp?), that's a cool part! I'm going to get a couple.

In the past I used small LCD voltmeters (EMV1200) but they weren't as waterproof as I would have liked, I had to waterproof them more by taking apart and sealing with RTV. Sample rate is too high as well, so the display bounces around a bit too.

http://www.alliedelec.com/Search/Pro...02&MPN=EMV1200



Voltmeters are great indicators if your charging system is failing or you are overloading your charging system with things like heated vests and grips. On my DRZ400S (sold) I had a switch to turn off the headlight so I could run the heated vest. I do ride all year round. The RXV has enough watts that power management isn't typically needed.
the best thing about it is the simplicity. steady green is good. you will instantly notice a different color (or flashing).

maybe in time to do something about it...
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Old 07-23-2009, 04:35 PM   #102
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Code Monkey i think you should wait to install gearing that low. 13/56 is crazy low. Please don't be insulted but i'm certain it's ridng technique and not gearing. Lowering the idle sounds like your trying to slow the bike down the wrong way. Try something different for a week or two before you regear.

You're trying to ride slowly on the throttle like your street bike. The clutch should be how you regulate the speed. Put the idle back to stock and adjust the clutch lever to where you can engage it with your two outer fingers on the bar under the lever. The clutch should release quickly after lever movement from the outer fingers. Make sure the lever is not to low making your elbow drop too much.

Now practice on level ground going as slow as you can without dabbing using the clutch for speed control. Just turn the throttle to 1/16+- and hold it there. Starts and stops while not adding any throttle is great too. Dragging the rear brake helps. Once your bored with this find small objects to bump up against doing the same then add a slight throttle blip and a little more clutch to get over smoothly.

It's much easier to master this on open ground than riding in nasty woods. The educated clutch feel will carry over directly though. Or skip the clutch all together and add a Recluse with a left hand brake. With this you can actually gear up and still be fine. I love the gearing i can run with my auto clutch but do miss playing with a manual clutch at slow speed.

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Old 07-23-2009, 05:38 PM   #103
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My 98 600 came to me with 15/40 front and rear sprockets. they felt perfect for Michigan riding conditions. When it came time to order new I just told the guy "stock" and ended up with 15/48. I lost some top end but I think I can climb trees.
your 13/56 is nuts. learn how to ride the bike, go get some basics lessons, watch some video, have someone demonstrate techniques, or sell it and get something you can handle.
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Old 07-23-2009, 07:55 PM   #104
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the best thing about it is the simplicity. steady green is good. you will instantly notice a different color (or flashing).

maybe in time to do something about it...
I've been battling with my Duck battery all summer. It's at least 4 years old and this last winter it just sat and sat and sat because of all the snow we had. Come decent riding weather and the battery shows about 10.6 volts. Yeah, I should have had it on a charger, but I was lazy. Charged it up and it will hold 12.4 V for about a week. Do it again and I finally get it to where it will hold 12.4 to 12.6 for about a week, but it just isn't making it. Been using a float charger on it for about a week. Reluctant to start in the morning, but it starts. Yesterday I stalled the bike in traffic and had to get a jump. I got home and measure the voltage at 12.65, then had the bright idea of turning on the ignition - it drops to 12.1 instantly. Time for a new battery (yes, the charging system is working fine, the battery just won't hold a charge).
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Old 07-23-2009, 07:59 PM   #105
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Uh guys, I've been riding for over forty years. I have ridden off road with very low gearing before. I know what it feels like and what I like. I had low gearing on my DR. As I said before, when on tight trails I like to go slow - I don't like to battle with the bike and the clutch (yes, I am getting a Rekluse - but that helps with the clutch, not the speed).

As for going as slow as my street bike - it doesn't do slow; first gear is good only above 20 MPH and goes up to 50 MPH easily. I never get out of second in town.

What the hell, if I don't like I can go back to stock gearing - but I've done this before, I know I will like it.
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