ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Riding > Ride reports
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 08-10-2009, 05:27 PM   #61
rubberneck
Area Man
 
rubberneck's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2009
Location: Streets of San Francisco
Oddometer: 28
Moab to Green River ... at least for me

After the White Rim Trail, the pool back at Slickrock Campground in Moab was fully refreshing. Dave & Ann ended up getting a hotel for the night, I stayed at the campground, and we planned to meet for breakfast at the place in Moab along main street that only serves breakfast. It was okay, not great. After that, we said our good-byes to Ann and left her at a cafe to catch a cab to the local airport in a couple of hours for her scheduled flight (more on that later).

Dave and I fueled up and saw a couple of guys at the gas station with a 990 Adventure and some other bikes in a trailer. They asked us about the WRT on big bikes and we said, "DO IT!" Hopefully they had a good time.

Without Ann riding pillion anymore, we lost our full-time photographer. We sort of spaced on taking pictures for a bit. In the meantime, we had a minor routing issue. Heading out of town on 191, our tracks (manually translated from Sam's maps and put into our GPS's) had us what looked to be cutting off the highway, and then what looked to be under the freeway and under/over some train tracks. After trying to go through a little bicycle tunnel and down a trail along some powerlines to a dead-end, we found our way back on the TAT. The signs led toward Gemini Bridges.

Dave was cruising along at a quicker pace now that he didn't have to worry about his passenger anymore, and we were making good time. Good time, that is, until we came to a decently aggressive ascent with some seriously fine, dry sand...

From Track Dave and Dave



Dave was in front and ended up losing his momentum at about 30 or 40 feet. I gave it a shot, and after losing my momentum at about 80 feet, was able to get it going again and made it to the top. This was difinitely one of the more difficult sections we had seen. Had the sand/powder not been so fine/dry/deep, it wouldn't have been bad at all, but it was squirrely, steep and already fully chewed up.


From Track Dave and Dave



After making it to the top, I hiked back down to help Dave. He was in a fully rutted, deep sand pool, and was having difficulty getting traction to go up or back down. We managed to get the bike towards the left side, which was seemingly less tracked out, but it still took some serious revving to get the bike moving. After 15 minutes or so, he managed to get some grab in the right spot, and squirreled his way up the hill. I hiked back up with his topcase and helmet in hand.

Shortly thereafter he noticed his clutch was not grabbing like it had been. Thinking it might just be over-heated, we cruised along at a brisk pace to get some airflow across the bike, and as the clutch started to slip all over the place, we went back to the old routine when the fuel-pump was acting up and found some shade to let everything cool down a bit.

After letting the bike cool for 45 minutes or so, we thought it best for him to continue on to Green River via highways, and for me to take the SPOT and some of his water and continue along the TAT to Green River. We'd sync up in Green River that evening, and wishfully think the clutch would heal itself along the way.

I set off towards Green River, and if I felt isolated and remote before, I felt even moreso now. I took a slightly slower pace with a little more caution as I was on my own if anything went wrong.

From Track Dave and Dave


Once in Green River, I was a bit suprised to not see Dave, but to actually find decent cell service. I gave him a call, and he actually answered. What luck! Cell service is a rare commodity along the TAT. He explained he had made it to the intersection of 191 and 70/50/6?, but that the clutch hadn't improved and had only become worse...
__________________
too tall to live, too weird to die
rubberneck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-2009, 06:23 PM   #62
CoydogSF OP
Ambitious Amatuer
 
CoydogSF's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Location: San Francisco, CA
Oddometer: 105
Leaving Moab (or trying...)

After leaving Dave and taking a perpendicular out to 191, the clutch on the F800GS was getting worse and worse. My thought was that if I could get it up to speed slowly and carefully, I would have enough friction to keep the bike moving and could get to somewhere with cell connection where I could see what the folks in "Beasts" thought about my predicament. Losing about 10 mph every 5 miles of the 20 mile ride up to I-70, I literally coasted into World Famous Papa Joe's Stop & Go in Crescent Junction, where 191 runs into I-70. Still trying to be optimistic, I parked the bike in the shade, got a snack and a drink and settled into a comfy patio chair with 3G coverage where I could post Help! F800GS clutch slipping - stuck near Green River, UT.


From Track Dave and Dave


Around that time, I heard from Dave who had made it to Green River via the TAT and was waiting at the Motel 6 we'd agreed upon with the help of the Zumo. I was telling him that I was still evaluating the situation when Ann called to say that her flight had been cancelled out of Moab and they were figuring out whether they'd put her up in Moab for the night or try to get her to Grand Junction. The three of us settled in to see how the chips would fall.

Within 20 minutes, the good inmates of ADV started responding and helping me think through some possibilities. I also ran into a guy on a K1200 who turned out to be a motorcycle mechanic. He mentioned that the clutch springs can tend to stretch and fatigue under extreme heat and that was his guess. So they'd recover after some time in the shade right? No. I hopped on the bike just in case. Now, I could let the clutch completely out in first gear and while it would pull a little, it wouldn't stall. Bad sign.

Time to make use of my BMW roadside assistance which despite being comically uninformed about my VIN, motorcycles in general, and the name of the "town" that seemed to made up wholly of Papa Joes, managed to put me in touch with a guy named Ray who would be out with a trailer shortly. We confirmed that BMW would cover getting the bike to the nearest dealer in Grand Junction but since they were closed on Sunday, that it would have to be stored in Moab and brought up there in the morning. When Ann called to say the airline was paying for a night in a motel in Moab, the plan came together and I hitched a ride with Ray and the bike into town. Dave would continue west on the TAT and I'd try to catch back up with him on I-70 from Grand Junction once the bike was fixed.

From Track Dave and Dave


Ray turned out to be a very interesting guy. We talked about our trip, his recoveries of flash flood ravaged jeeps down Kane Creek, pole barns, hot rods and who knows what else before he dropped me in front of the Moab Valley Inn and we agreed on a 7:00 am departure for Grand Junction. Within minutes Ann and I were crossing the street to the Moab Brewing Company for some beers and dinner.

As soon as we walked in, we recognized the group in front of us as the French tourists in the Toyotas who'd let Ann soak up their AC in the final miles of the WRT. With an exclamation of something like "Se vive!" we knew they were happy to see she made it. Turns out they'd decided to turn around when the road got ugly as we'd warned them it would. After Ann and I had downed the beer sampler platter and a pint each of our favorite, we decided to send a bottle of wine over to the French group's table with a Moab Valley Brewing Company bandana tied around it. Hey, we owed them a replacement for the bandana the one guy had given to Ann. We watched the waiter walk with it towards the table, then suddenly turn and put it down on the table next to them who were very excited by the unexpected gift and proceeded to tie the bandana around the father's head and generally make merry with our wine! When we explained to the waiters that they'd brought it to the wrong table, they were horrified and apologetic. We took matters into our own hands, arranging to cover the three pitchers of beer they'd ordered and hand-delivering another bandana.



They were so surprised and thankful and insisted on taking about 100 pictures with us. As we walked away they were each posing for more pictures with the bandana. They'd really helped us be more comfortable on the trail and it felt good to see them so happy. 'Course, by then we were feeling pretty loose, having been nervously sipping on pints while this whole thing was going down. We crashed after a long day in limbo, anxious to see what the next day would bring.

CoydogSF screwed with this post 08-18-2009 at 01:10 PM
CoydogSF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-2009, 06:28 PM   #63
BCRides
Gnarly Adventurer
 
BCRides's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2006
Location: Monument, CO
Oddometer: 388
__________________
2006 KTM 525 EXC
2008 KTM 990 Adventure
SPOT BCRides
www.BarryCookRealEstate.com
BCRides is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-2009, 07:36 PM   #64
juniorsktm
Studly Adventurer
 
juniorsktm's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2008
Location: Marietta, Ga
Oddometer: 823
Dave and Dave,

Great report, you guys still out there reporting live? I would think you're finished by now? ANyhow, I am missing the trip and I have only been back 11 days. These are the great memories that make great telling!

Ya'll are the best!

Frank
__________________
RIDE TO RIDE AGAIN
juniorsktm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-2009, 07:52 PM   #65
Pedalpusher
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Pedalpusher's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2007
Location: SoCal when stopped
Oddometer: 204
Great report! Nice ridin' two up too
Pedalpusher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2009, 06:28 AM   #66
DockingPilot
Hooked Up and Hard Over
 
DockingPilot's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2004
Location: Andover, N.J.
Oddometer: 9,342
Bar risers Dave ? Hope everything works out. Waiting on the next chapter !
__________________
Frank Reinbold

"Every bike I ever had, was the best bike I ever had, when I had it"
DockingPilot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2009, 07:42 PM   #67
one2many
Ghetto Superstar
 
one2many's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2007
Location: Mississippi
Oddometer: 106
one2many is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2009, 04:45 PM   #68
NewEnglander
Gnarly Adventurer
 
NewEnglander's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2007
Location: Greenville NH
Oddometer: 272
Cool Report

Breakin out the popcorn!
__________________
If youre gonna be dumb ya gotta be tough.


[COLOR=Red]2008 BMW R1200 GS Adventure
NewEnglander is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2009, 05:47 PM   #69
rubberneck
Area Man
 
rubberneck's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2009
Location: Streets of San Francisco
Oddometer: 28
Green River Train Tracks & Black Dragon Canyon...

With Dave back in Moab, and in BMW Service limbo, I decided I may as well continue on westward with a new location along the TAT to regroup. We decided that either Salina, UT or more likely Eureka, NV would be the next possible spots to meet up. I packed up and headed out with plenty of water and trail-mix squirreled away.

In addition to having had Ann around to take a lot of pictures, because I was generally following them for both mechanical and safety reasons, most of the navigation issues weren't my concern. I would just follow along, or hear over the scala that I had missed a turn somewhere. Now that I was on my own, and wasn't in the habit of checking my tracks, it was easy for me to drift off course. Heading out of Green River, I somehow ended up on the north side of the train tracks...

It wasn't as though I was the first motorcycle to ride this way. Perhaps other TAT riders did too, and there were certainly enough tracks in the dirt/sand/clay to make it seem like I was on course. I figured that at some point there'd be a spot to cross underneath the tracks, or maybe a railroad crossing in a trail, but as the trail veered south in my GPS, there was no logical place to get across the tracks.

Being relatively new to dirtbikes, and having not been around many train tracks before, I thought that it was probably just a simple matter of riding over the tracks, and heading south towards the frontage road along Highway 70. It didn't really dawn on me that I might be acting like a complete idiot, nor had I ever thought of myself as a Darwin Award nominee before. Basically, after looking in each direction along the curved track for a train, and not seeing any, I gunned the throttle and tried to muscle my way across the first rail. Not a problem. I went up the embankment with ease. My front tire was over the rail like a mere speedbump, but I soon realized the loose, light gravel that the raised tracks rested on were not holding my rear tire, I let off the throttle. At this point, my bike was half way across the first rail -- but I was still confident I was doing the right thing.

After taking another look left and right for oncoming trains, I calmly gave the bike some gas and only dug my rear wheel deeper into the rocks, which were really light -- almost volcanic. It only took a moment to realize that I wasn't really going anywhere because my skidplate was firmly resting on the rail.

OH CRAP! My calm, not a problem, this is a piece of cake, easy going attitude was quickly turned into thoughts of being swept away by a freight train. A quick glance left and right showed no trains, but trying to rock my bike backwards off the tracks did absolutely nothing. It barely budged. I was in trouble, and although it was probably going to be hours before the next train, I had convinced myself there was one speeding towards me just around the bend. I got off my bike, which wouldn't fall over as it was fully resting on the skidplate, and started to frantically dig around the rear tire to clear out the volcanic rocks/gravel. It was nearly all the way up to my chain at this point. I was kicking up a rooster tail of gravel, but with my hands. After some of the rocks were cleared, I was able to rock the bike a little bit now, but it was just barely budging. I dug more rocks out of the way, until I could get the wheel to spin freely. Using all of my stength, I was finally able to roll the bike up and off the rail and after several more tries was able to get the front wheel back over the rail. The whole process probably only took about 5 minutes, but if felt like 5 hours.

I'm still pissed at myself for not getting a picture of my bike resting there. It did cross my mind that I would step back and calmly take video if a train were to come, but apparently there wasn't time for a photo with the imaginary train barreling down the tracks.


I ended up retracing my tracks back east towards Green River, until there was a legitimate undercrossing. I'm glad I scouted and opted not to cut through a drainage path, as that would have really gotten me into a predicament. After about a 45 minute or so detour, I was back on track...



From Track Dave and Dave


I was coming up on Black Dragon Canyon/Wash, which is always mentioned in just about every TAT report I've seen. It was pretty cool to be approaching it live, in person...


From Track Dave and Dave



The canyon itself was full of loose rocks and sand as you might expect from a wash, and the trail was sometimes in the dry creekbed and sometimes not. I found myself looking up at the ridge a lot for some sort of ambush from above.


From Track Dave and Dave




Apparently somebody had some issues right about here...


From Track Dave and Dave




Coming out of the canyon, I definitely had a moment that I was on my way back home, rather than in the midst of a 3 week vacation...

From Track Dave and Dave
__________________
too tall to live, too weird to die
rubberneck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2009, 05:56 PM   #70
DockingPilot
Hooked Up and Hard Over
 
DockingPilot's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2004
Location: Andover, N.J.
Oddometer: 9,342
Cool !
Hey a lot of TAT riders cross OVER those tracks mistakenly leaving Green River. However, your supposed to go under them. There is a small trestle that allows this. But anyway, keep it coming !
__________________
Frank Reinbold

"Every bike I ever had, was the best bike I ever had, when I had it"
DockingPilot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2009, 08:52 PM   #71
rokklym
one man wolfpack
 
rokklym's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2004
Location: Westby Wisconsin
Oddometer: 4,439
Great ride report!
__________________
Check out the Blog!
MotoGraphic
MotoGraphic Tumblr
Chad Berger DR650, KTM 990 Adventure R
Lone Wolf Expeditions
rokklym is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-18-2009, 01:58 PM   #72
CoydogSF OP
Ambitious Amatuer
 
CoydogSF's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Location: San Francisco, CA
Oddometer: 105
Oh no, stuck in Grand Junction again...

When I read the first line of Dave's last post, I was sure it said "With Dave back in Moab, and in the BMW Service limo" instead of "limbo." Good stuff.

Yeah, I was in limbo alright. I rode with my new best friend, Ray, 2 hours to Grand Junction with the F800GS in tow. We arrived at the combo Harley/BMW dealership (huh?) and I took my place in line behind 5 or 6 hog riders whining about a slight drag on a brake pad and rattles from a hard bag and which new loud as F exhaust to install while I patiently waited to determine the fate of my trip. Turns out the BMW tech was not in on Mondays but after some begging on my part would stop in sometime that day to have a look. While I was appreciative, I felt the need to remind them (now that I seemed to know more about the operation of a BMW Motorrad service center than they did) that I was VOR (vehicle off road) and they would need to order the part by 2 pm if it was to be overnighted. I called at 1:45 to learn that the tech had evaluated the bike and determined I needed new clutch plates which were on the way. With that, I let Dave know that it'd be Tuesday at the earliest before I could catch up with him and found a cheap Motel 6 where I settled in for a Shark Week marathon on Discovery.

I woke up the next morning optimistic. I gave the dealership until 11 to wade through the Big Dogs and Road Kings and Astro Glides before calling for an update. Seems our generous tech had indeed come by the shop the day before but had only started the bike up rather than taking anything apart and just guessed on the plates. Now that he had it open, it was clear that it needed new springs as well. Might I mention that we need to order those before 2 pm if there's any chance of getting them by WEDS! With Friday morning as a drop dead deadline for getting home in time for a good friend's wedding that evening, that was going to be tight. Doable in two days if I stuck to 70 and 80 (and rode 90!), but still tight.

I realized I couldn't spend another day holed up in the Motel 6 and started looking for a way out of town for the night. Harley dealer rental bikes - all rented for Sturgis Bike Week. Other bike rental places - dirt bikes and ATV's only. Airport rental cars - all out. Rental cars around town - all out. Okay, staying in GJ it appears. A few web searches and I saw a link for a place called "The Alehouse" somewhere between the motel and downtown. Now that sounded like a place I could spend a couple hours. How far could downtown be? I walked about a mile before seeing this sign...

From Track Dave and Dave


Soaked through my t-shirt and with my tank bag hung over my shoulder with a bungee, I walked into The Alehouse and began sampling . Three STRONG microbrews in I heard from the dealership that they'd located 5 of the 6 clutch springs they needed and were looking for one more. With one spring standing between me getting home in time for this wedding, I started looking into flights as a backup. Having found a flight that would be my last resort, I weaved out of The Alehouse and continued my forced march towards "downtown." But in my highly suggestable state, I was easily distracted...

From Track Dave and Dave


Two IPA's later I got a text and then a call from Dave...
CoydogSF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2009, 02:37 PM   #73
rubberneck
Area Man
 
rubberneck's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2009
Location: Streets of San Francisco
Oddometer: 28
On the ride to Salina

Continuing on from the Black Dragon Canyon area, the terrain slowly transformed from a Martian landscape to more the backdrop for High Plains Drifter. Less red, more gray, less dirt, more gravel and shrubbrush. During a couple of spots along the TAT in both Colorado and Utah, there were some washes/creekbeds that looked as though they were God's own toothpaste basin. I couldn't tell if it was some sort of mining pollution, or just a natural occurance. My guess was the former, but I ain't no high-falutin' Fluvial Geomorphologist with leather elbow patches.

This picture didn't totally capture the toothpastiness of it all...

From Track Dave and Dave


Cruising solo was fun, as I could go at my own pace, but it also sort of sucked, because my solo pace was usually a bit on the safer side of fast. Not seeing anybody for an hour or more in each direction meant I was truly on my own if something went wrong. I did have the SPOT, just in case. Being alone also meant that I had to stop and take pictures for myself.

From Track Dave and Dave



After seeing other peoples ride reports and various pictures of the very spots I was riding, there was often a sense of dejavu all over again. Somebody had mentioned the giant rat turds in a previous thread, and that captured the essence of these constipative droppings. I couldn't help but scan the horizon for a 200 ft rodent.

From Track Dave and Dave



I had been hoping for more sweet, sweet water crossings on this voyage, but some over-zealous civil engineer ruined another refreshing splash...

From Track Dave and Dave



Perhaps I was a bit dehydrated, but I really thought I was going to see a scrawny old prospector emerging from this shack. Turns out there wasn't even a mine within, but just a little shady shelter for cows and their keepers...

From Track Dave and Dave




For the next while, on the way to Salina along 70, there were several underpasses weaving the trail north and south of the interstate. I took a picture each time, but they all pretty much looked just like this, plus or minus some rural graffiti.

From Track Dave and Dave



Having seen pictures of this tunnel in other TAT threads, it was yet another "this is all too familiar" moment. It turns out that I70 is like 20 feet to my right, so it doesn't have quite as much of the 1910's old-timey charm I had been anticipating. Never-the-less, it was pretty cool to ride through and it sure made my bike sound good!

From Track Dave and Dave
__________________
too tall to live, too weird to die
rubberneck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2009, 03:30 PM   #74
Oni
Ronin
 
Oni's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2006
Location: Pasadena - Californistan
Oddometer: 1,839
Nice RR!

If they had those 800's around when I bought my X...I might be on one of those instead.
Oni is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2009, 03:44 PM   #75
rubberneck
Area Man
 
rubberneck's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2009
Location: Streets of San Francisco
Oddometer: 28
End of the line...

I stayed the night in Salina at the Friendly Inn and got an early start as my plan was to make it to Eureka in one day. That had been the next agreed upon meeting spot with Dave, and I was still hoping he'd get his clutch issues straightened out. I took a wrong turn somewhere on the way to Richfield and my GPS seemed to be acting up, because the trail I was on didn't match anything in particular, but I was on dirt and sort of on a trail, and generally headed towards Richfield, so I stayed on it. The weird thing was that my GPS told me I was crossing over a major highway in a couple of instances, where there was no highway within 1000 or more yards. I restarted my GPS once I made it to Richfield and all was fine after that. I had to stop to get some fresh lithium batteries for the SPOT. It turns out I hadn't been broadcasting my location for a while, and the folks back home were about to send in the Utah National Guard or something.

Heading out of Richfield, I was immediately in Fishlake National Forest along the Paiute ATV trail. This was some seriously FUN riding. The trail was often burmed, with whoop-de-whoops and some nice scenery along the way...

From Track Dave and Dave



All was great. The weather was warm, but not yet hot, the dirt was packed, but not dusty. I was really enjoying myself and cruising along at a decent clip. It crossed my mind that Dave must really be bummed to be missing out on this, and that it would have been nice to have had him there to talk about the sweet jumps I was going off. My mind began to drift to all of the mechanical issues he had been having, and just how reliable my bike had been throughout the entire trip. I was in the midst of my own, personal KTM is awesome moment, when suddenly and without warning, my rear wheel completely seized up... I must have skid/slid close to 100 feet or so...

From Track Dave and Dave


From Track Dave and Dave



I managed to keep the bike up and come to a stop. My first thought was that something, somehow got wedged such that it forced the rear brakes closed, but the weird thing was that my clutch lever simultaneously went all spongy on me. My 1990 BMW K75s' master cylinder once failed, which froze the brakes, but that wouldn't explain the clutch. I tried to wash some of the dirt of the rear pads, to make sure there was clearance, which there was. It wasn't until I took off the sprocket cover that I realized what had happened...

From Track Dave and Dave


Somehow, the chain-slider had come loose, or failed, and got sucked between the chain and the sprocket. You'll also notice that this forced the chain outward, which pushed the chain into the clutch slave cylinder. Game over. This was the end of the line. While I've pulled off many a MacGyver in my day, there was no way to jimmy-rig a fix for this. I was 12 miles from Kanosh and hadn't seen anybody in a good hour or two...

I packed up all of my water, trail-mix, my gps (marking my bike) and the SPOT and started the long walk to Kanosh. By now it was getting close to noon and it was heating up. I had given my running shoes to a friend to drive home after the music festival, so footwear-wise, my options were flip-flops or motorcycle boots. I opted for the boots.

I'm in decent, not great shape. I struggled through a half-marathon back in May, and knew I'd be able to hike my way to help, but after about 6 or 7 miles, my feet were blistered and the mid-day Utah sun was beating down. I was really, really ready for help, and just then, I saw a couple of US Forest Rangers about to get into their trucks. I told them my situation, and they were able to give me a lift to Kanosh, and actually recommended a little shop in Fillmore that might be of more help. Fillmore is a thriving metropolis next to Kanosh.

Once in Fillmore, I text'ed Dave that I was broke down, and we might need to look into bike transportation to get us both back to SF in time for our friends' wedding. Meanwhile, a local mechanic named Dwight took me back into Fishlake National Forest in his 70s Blazer with a trailer to rescue my bike. We had to cut the chain in order to free up the rear wheel to be able to move the bike and get it on his trailer. Dwight was a good dude. I'm not sure how I could have gotten my bike out of there without his help. I settled in for the night at the Best Western knowing Dave would be there in the morning...
__________________
too tall to live, too weird to die
rubberneck is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 10:15 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014