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Old 08-26-2014, 08:19 AM   #1
CodeMonkee OP
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Shiny Deck & patio - two problems



I have two problems.

First the deck.

I have the deck above - goes to my "front" door.

I also have a deck on the side facing the driveway, covered and twice as large.

Then on the other side of the house I have a deck about 1000 to 1500 SF.

The deck above is bare wood, the others are painted (purple - yuck).

They all are slippery when wet - i.e. about 6 months out of the year.

I want to put a non-slip surface on them.

I looked at the Rustoleum, Behr, Olympic, etc., deck "restoration" products that cover worn out decks in a thick paint, usually touted as non-slip.

Most of the people who have used these say they don't last more than a year, with them peeling, bubbling, etc., and then removing them, ironically, is a PITA.

I did find this which seems to have good reviews:

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Sure-Step...stomer_reviews

But I thought I would ask around for other opinions as to products.

I thought about just laying down some regular paint and adding sand, but that might not work well. I don't want strips - they will peel up. I looked at laying some kind of covering on it - like astro-turf, but from what I have read this is a bad idea as it holds water against the wood and the wood rots.

I want to do this to my other decks as they are worse than this one - with the paint they are very slick.

An awning won't help - the weather here blows the rain sideways and anything outside, covered or not, gets wet.

Feedback?

Thanks
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CodeMonkee screwed with this post 08-26-2014 at 08:24 AM
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Old 08-26-2014, 08:24 AM   #2
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Second problem - that rock patio.

Sand between the rocks.

Every year I have to pressure wash the rocks or to remove lichen and moss and dirt.

Problem is weeds and moss get into the sand between them.

The washer hits the side of the the rocks and the sand goes everywhere, no small amount ending up on me. Messy messy job.

I want to find a way to put something harder between the rocks, but I don't want to use concrete or grout (unless there is no other way).

I have read about this stuff you put on dirt that makes it hard.

http://landscapeonline.com/research/article/18

I am wondering if that will work for this problem.

I will still have to pressure wash the rocks, there is no way I know of to get around that and still keep the natural look of the rocks.

Ideas?

Thanks
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Old 08-26-2014, 09:18 AM   #3
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Can't help with the deck issues, but depending on cost, I would use polymeric sand for the joints between the rocks. Sweep in and mist with water. Will harden to a concrete like substance and very little will grow in it. Haven't seen or used the product you've linked, but would consider. Again, cost would be decider.

I have had very good performance from polymerics in the past.
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Old 08-26-2014, 09:42 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by NICO View Post
Can't help with the deck issues, but depending on cost, I would use polymeric sand for the joints between the rocks. Sweep in and mist with water. Will harden to a concrete like substance and very little will grow in it. Haven't seen or used the product you've linked, but would consider. Again, cost would be decider.

I have had very good performance from polymerics in the past.
Kewl - thanks
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Old 08-26-2014, 12:22 PM   #5
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I believe the deck wood is fir, not redwood and not cedar

The deck in the photo, the smallest, has never been painted, the others are.

Pressure washing seems to bring out the ridges in the grain of the wood and it does not make it less slippery.

I don't want to have to repaint the decks every year.
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Old 08-26-2014, 12:26 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NICO View Post
Can't help with the deck issues, but depending on cost, I would use polymeric sand for the joints between the rocks. Sweep in and mist with water. Will harden to a concrete like substance and very little will grow in it. Haven't seen or used the product you've linked, but would consider. Again, cost would be decider.

I have had very good performance from polymerics in the past.
Would it be prudent to check grading before doing this? You'd be turning semi-permeable to non-permeable which would accentuate any specific grading issues. It'd be good to know whether you would want to reset any of those flagstones *before* turning it into one piece. Low areas become ice hazards and just collect dirt. If the low area is by the foundation, that'd suck too.

Too bad you'd lose the permeability. But I don't think I'd enjoy keeping up w/ re-packing between flagstones either.
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Old 08-26-2014, 01:31 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by DriveShaft View Post
Would it be prudent to check grading before doing this? You'd be turning semi-permeable to non-permeable which would accentuate any specific grading issues. It'd be good to know whether you would want to reset any of those flagstones *before* turning it into one piece. Low areas become ice hazards and just collect dirt. If the low area is by the foundation, that'd suck too.

Too bad you'd lose the permeability. But I don't think I'd enjoy keeping up w/ re-packing between flagstones either.
There is an area around the edges that are small river rocks, some of these are tied into deep French drains at each end. So no real drainage problems there despite the fact that there is a lot of rain (it is on a "mountain" - more of a hill really - in Orygun).

The house is a custom triple wide manufactured home on a concrete pad, so no real foundation so to speak.

I don't anticipate problems in that regard.
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Old 08-27-2014, 08:13 AM   #8
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Well off the question but I'd yank all that shit up (purple deck ) and put down some of that composite decking. I build decks as a side hustle and forking love it! Higher up front cost but long lasting, zero maintenance other than a pressure washing every few years and easy to work with, makes me look much better than I am. Ya know, kind of like my KTM.

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Old 08-27-2014, 08:23 AM   #9
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I think Colemanfu has a good suggestion, given that you live in Oregon with nothing but rain. Anything you coat that deck with is going to be an ongoing headache with that kind of moisture.

Either way, I think you might consider ripping out the purple because recoating all the time is going to be miserable.

I have a hardwood deck made of Mangaris. Fast growing south American tree-farm hardwood. It's very tough stuff, cost me about what the composite decking would have, and beautiful. Holds up well in moisture (snow sits on it for months on end) and I treat it once a year with Flood wood preservative.

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Old 08-27-2014, 09:08 AM   #10
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I too live in moss land. About twice a year I get pickling vinegar (7% acetic acid) and spray the cracks between the rocks. Vinegar is cheap, load it in a pressurized sprayer, set it on stream not spray and done in a jiffy.
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Old 08-27-2014, 08:39 PM   #11
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I already put $25K into property improvements this year (paved driveway and private road and a few other things) - I am not going to rip wood that isn't rotten.

Plus I am going to sell this place when I retire in about 5 years, so I have to pick and choose what improvements I make, and a new deck around a triple wide manufactured home doesn't sound like a good investment to me, so I'll pass on that idea.

My next place, yeah, probably composite deck - assuming I have a place built (which is the plan unless I find a place I really like). I am thinking a shop like kind of thing with living quarters - kind of one of those barn style shops, except this would be split level, with the end with the entrance to the shop on the ground floor being under the living room that has large windows and a deck above the shop doors.

Kind of like this:



But split level with most of the shop except the doors being sub-terranean.

The idea being that this would be where I live spring to fall while the weather is nice here, and live in the South Pacific or travel somewhere warm in the winter.

About the only big expenses I have been considering for this house is a new roof (metal with rigid foam insulation) and maybe a geothermal heat pump - both of which would bump up the value of the home.

My shop I want to insulate more, add propane heating, replace the single pane windows with double or triple pane, and put door openers on the rollup doors.
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Old 08-27-2014, 09:17 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by Colemanfu View Post
Well off the question but I'd yank all that shit up (purple deck ) and put down some of that composite decking. I build decks as a side hustle and forking love it! Higher up front cost but long lasting, zero maintenance other than a pressure washing every few years and easy to work with, makes me look much better than I am. Ya know, kind of like my KTM.

You might consider removing the dead dog from your next job.
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Old 09-07-2014, 09:25 AM   #13
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Got the deck mostly painted yesterday.



Went to Benjamin Moore to get some Insl-x non-slip paint.

They didn't have it in stock.

Paint guy suggested "arbor" paint made for decks and rails and such. Suggested I just use finely ground walnut shells for the non-slip - put down a coat of paint, then the shells, then paint over that.

So I bought a gallon to try it.

Seems to have worked okay. I ran out of the walnuts so I used some fine sand on the rest. The walnut shells are better - I think they soak up some of the paint so they stick better. The sand seems to rub off because it doesn't soak up the paint.

I ran out of paint because I didn't prime my sprayer correctly and wasted some paint, but I am going to paint a side deck so I will get some more and finish this deck too.

Looks good so far - but those are the famous last words. The test will be how well does it look this time next year. I don't want to have to repaint the decks every year.

If it is still good next year I may paint the big deck that is about 1500 SF.

Thanks for all the suggestions.
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Old 09-07-2014, 09:35 AM   #14
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Ever thought of indoor outdoor carpet or astroturf?



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Old 09-07-2014, 09:44 AM   #15
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Ever thought of indoor outdoor carpet or astroturf?
I did.

And from everything I read this is the worst thing you can do to a wood deck.

It traps the moisture against the deck, making it rot all the faster.
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