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Old 05-26-2014, 03:50 AM   #1
Iranian OP
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buyers guide

Buyer’s guide for potential motorcycle buyers

This buyer’s guide is aimed to take potential motorcycle buyer’s through the first steps for buying a brand new or used bike. In this buyers guide you will also find links for more technical aspects of buying a bike. Personally I have owned brand new as well as old bikes so I can advise for both situations.
The first question a buyer should ask him or herself is what kind of riding do he or she wants to do and over what sort of mileage. Doing the right preparation from the beginning will save the buyer a lot of trouble.


Do you want to use your bike for :
Commuting to the workplace and occasional week trips, or;
Just cruising around at moderate speed, or;
Travelling long distances, even to foreign countries?
Riding off road?

By answering this question you have basically taken a very important step. It will show in which direction you should direct your energy and investment.
When you have made your decision, you should start asking yourself if you should buy a brand new bike or a used one. I would like to point out I personally have meet very few biker that owned a bike for a long time and put lots miles on the bike and still wants to ride the same bike or similar bike. Most bikers like my self wants to change bike after a couple of seasons on. You might find out that the bikes don’t suit your body, wallet or just isn’t that kind of riding you want to do.


If you have rock solid financial situation and you desire to buy a brand new bike, go for it but if you have a tweaky financial situation, it just will put unnecessary stress on your finances. Personally as a biker who likes to travel, I want to have a bike that is dead reliable. During a short vacation abroad, the last thing you want to happen is that you have a mechanical failure. Buying a motorcycle like any other vehicle is so cost a lot more than the purchase price. There is taxes, insurance, wear parts like tires or scheduled maintenance that you should take under consideration. The motorcycle industry likes to charge you big bucks for scheduled maintenance, insurance and tires.


Next step is to think of is how many cylinder your bike should have. Well, this question is partially answered buy the previous question but this is also something you have to find out by testing different bikes. Personally I like to drive parallel twins. Most twins run smoother than a thumper, a one cylinder bike but are not as complex as a four or six cylinder bike, which means lower running costs.
There are three different drive systems on motorcycle, chains, belt or shaft drive. All three of them have pros and cons. Chain drive needs to be lubricated regularly but it is the cheapest and easiest one to repair. Shaft drive keeps the bike clean and has very little maintenance but it is expensive to repair when it breaks down. Modern shaft drive system tend to be are very reliable though. Belt drives today have a long life and require little maintenance but are expensive to change and are prone to damage by stones.



If you are a first time buyer or a novice biker, doing a good research before you go out to buy a bike is very important. It will save you a lot of money, disappointment and headache in the long run. There are a lot of test reviews, owner reviews and results from technical inspections that you can have a look at and it is a good idea to bring a friend with you who has experience of owning bikes.


There is one thing I like to point out. If you decide to go for a modern bike, I would like to recommend you to go for a bike with ABS brake system. It is not only much safer, it is also a good selling point when you come to sell the bike. If you are not sure what ABS does or do know but are not entirely convinced these two links will help to convince you that ABS is the way to go. From 2016 ABS is mandatory equipment on a new bike, at least for the countries with European Union.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nDvkr8e6EVM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q5wqqg97r4E
When you finally are just about to buy a bike, do a good research on the history of the bike, how many previous owners the bike have had, how long they have had the bike, that it has full service history. Very important factor is the owner himself. By analyzing the owner and how he has cared for the bike will give you a good idea in what condition the bike is in. There are always good and bad signs that will help you decide whether you should continue with the purchase or not. It is very important to check that there is no outstanding finance attached to the bike, to ensure you do not take over the liabilities. If everything is on order it is then time for doing a test ride. Testrides can be a tricky part for the seller and the buyer. Every country has their own rules to what to do during a test drive. You have to look into what the local laws says about that.



Before visiting the seller, make sure that the owner knows that you want to test drive a dead cold bike. A preheated bike can hide problems that will not notice until the bike is driven under cold conditions. During the test drive itself, make sure that you drive the bike in different ways, fast, slow and medium. All of them will detect problems with the bike and also if the bike suits your needs. Rev it hard when you work your way through the gearbox. If the bike has problems with the gearbox by revving the bike hard a gear might just jump out of its track. During slow riding listen to the engine and gearbox so you don’t hear strange for unusual/strange noises.



Revving the bike in the lower gears will also tell you if the bike has vibrations that are going to annoy you. Make sure that you do make a lot of turns with the bike. That will tell you if something is wrong with the steering head bearings. If you have to wrestle the bike’s handlebars, you should suspect that the steering head bearing needs replacing. If you are sufficiently interested in the bike, you could use this as a bargaining tool to reduce the price. This is nothing that very expensive but can be used for reducing the price. Take a good look at the front fork, let your fingers go over the fork to detect any oil leaks from the front fork. Compress the forks with the front brake on, to check for smooth operation and proper damping. Sit on the bike and apply weight to the rear suspension to check for the same.During the test drive make sure that you make a hard brake to test the brakes. If the front or back disc/discs have any uneven surface you will notice it by pulsing of the brake lever. If the bike is equipped with an ABS brake system make sure that you test the ABS system since it can expensive to repair. One way to check the ABS is to make a hard brake to see if the ABS kicks in or not. You can also check the dashboard so that the ABS warning light is not lightened.


Try to listen to the engine when the engine is cold versus hot. Be aware of an air cooled engine has more mechanical noise than a water cooled engine due the fact that the water has a damping effect on mechanical noise. The tolerances in an air-cooled engine are also less tight because of the greater temperature changes experienced in an air cooled engine. Different brands have different tolerance in their engines which lead to that different brand has different engine noise. What is normal for example in Italian bike might not be normal in Japanese bikes.



Take a very good look at different parts of the engine. If you see oil leakage or oil be sweating, it must be further investigated. During the test ride check if the engine is responding smoothly and if the bike is not responding correctly, it can be anything from a silly thing to a nightmare to repair. Listen to how the bike runs on idle. It should run smoothly. A rough idle can also be an indication of problems.


Check the bearing in the front and back wheels. It helps a lot if the bike has a center stand. Put the bike on center stand and grab the wheel at 4 a clock and 10 a clock and jerk it around to see if you find a play. If there is a play the bearings need replacing. It is not expensive but again it can used to reduce the price.



Now it is time to inspect the drive system of the bike. Bikes have normally chain, belt or shaft drive. All of them have its benefit and down sides. I personally prefer chain since I like to travel. Chain is simplest and cheapest one to repair while being a broad. Every bike has a specific free play in the chain. The free play is normally written on the chain guide. Grab the chain from the rear sprocket. It should sit tightly on the rear sprocket. If you can lift it up from the sprocket. It needs to be replaced. If the sprockets have sharp edges it is also a sign that the chain and the sprockets needs to be changed. It should also be easy to change gears while driving. When you see sign of wear, you always change the chain and sprockets simultaneously.



If the bike has belt drive, inspect the belt and the pulleys carefully, if the belt shows signs of holes and wear it should be replaced. As a guide, a dealer will charge about 800 euro to change a belt on a Japanese bike. Shaft drives today are normally very reliable but make sure that it does not make strange sounds or have excessive play/slack, because shaft drives are expensive to repair, regardless of which brand you have.


Bear in mind that modern bikes have a lot of electronics compared to bikes in the past. Make sure to test every detail to avoid unnecessary costs in the future. For more details upon technical inspection of bike before buying a bike I would like to recommend visiting the following link.
http://www.clarity.net/adam/buying-bike.html
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Old 05-26-2014, 03:50 AM   #2
Iranian OP
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I have written a couple of articles that I want to upload here if the moderators don't mind it.
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Old 05-26-2014, 07:35 PM   #3
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Quote:
The first question a buyer should ask him or herself is what kind of riding do he or she wants to do and over what sort of mileage. Doing the right preparation from the beginning will save the buyer a lot of trouble.


Do you want to use your bike for :
• Commuting to the workplace and occasional week trips, or;
• Just cruising around at moderate speed, or;
• Travelling long distances, even to foreign countries?
• Riding off road?...
...
Why not "AND"?


And excuse me, but are you sure you want to post this in ADVRIDER?????


Can a mod move this to JoMomma?
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Old 05-26-2014, 08:07 PM   #4
Emperor Norton
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Venteuri View Post
Why not "AND"?


And excuse me, but are you sure you want to post this in ADVRIDER?????


Can a mod move this to JoMomma?
Why not? I can't count the number of is X, Y, or Z a good first bike threads. Perhaps the OP could cull some of the "I want a hayabusa as my first motorcycle to ride in shorts, flip flops and a tshirt is this a good idea" threads.
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Old 05-26-2014, 08:55 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Venteuri View Post
Why not "AND"?


And excuse me, but are you sure you want to post this in ADVRIDER?????


Can a mod move this to JoMomma?
OR (AND), you could CONTRIBUTE instead of squawking, bro. this is road warriors, not one of those gs subforums or ride reports.
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Old 05-27-2014, 01:13 AM   #6
Iranian OP
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I see a lot of threads here that I don't like. I just skip them and avoid to read them again.

Iranian screwed with this post 05-27-2014 at 01:29 AM
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