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Old 12-18-2010, 04:33 AM   #8431
Ze Viking
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maxxa View Post
yes, this one
maybe I just have to change spring in rear shock absorber
I have something cheaper taht was done to mine for the previous owner that needed to lower the bike. It's a small mod that ables to adjust the rear height. I'll post a pic later! ;)
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Old 12-18-2010, 05:05 AM   #8432
Jacqueslemac
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Africa Queens do (or did) a high-lift rear link (i.e. it's shorter than standard). I have one fitted to my RD04.
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Old 12-18-2010, 09:42 AM   #8433
Ladder106
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Jim,

Many thanks for the tutorial......one more question however.

-- IF soldering is the best way to make this connection, would it be even better to solder the stator wires directly to the rectifier wires?? --

I realize that this makes field repairs a bit more difficult but most people don't carry around a spare rectifier so a shop is necessary for repair anyway.

Since this part isn't replaced that often and if bad connections are the main reason for rectifier failure it seems that directly soldering the connections may be the best solution.

What am I missing?
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Old 12-18-2010, 10:29 AM   #8434
Ladder106
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Maxxa,

If you are considering longer travel forks for your AT, there are many things to consider.

Yes, the rear does require a "lift" in order to re-balance the bike. The amount depends on the forks you use.

If your rear spring is the original, it is most likely tired and a bit "sacked-out". No longer as long as it's original unloaded length and not providing the spring rate it started life with. Depending on your body weight and how you load the bike when you ride you may be overwhelming the stock spring.

My bike is a modified Transalp with RD03 rear suspension linkage (no different from the TA) and RD03 swingarm and a Ricor rear shock. So that is the platform I'm using for my reference. In short I have RD03 suspension on the bike at present.

There are two main avenues used to increase rear suspension travel/ride height.

(a)The easiest and most direct increases ride height only NOT suspension travel. Carlos (locorider) has a very elegant (and inexpensive) method to add a spacer to the bottom of the standard shock that uses an automobile lug nut and a longer bolt. Search for this on the "Show Us Your Transalp Modifications" thread here in ADV.

(b)The Africa Queens part involves replacing the length of the "U" shaped suspension link that ties the frame to the swingarm. This piece is expensive and WILL result in not only increased ride height but also an increase in suspension travel. Because it alters the rear wheel to shock absorber travel ratio, a new (heavier) rear spring will most likely be needed. I have no idea what spring rate to suggest here (the shock valving most likely should also be changed here).

Now, a few words of caution:

Get advice from Stormforce and others who have sucessfully completed this modification before proceeding.

Simply bolting longer forks onto the front end is usually not the best solution. The fork travel has to be adjusted so the front wheel/fender does NOT contact your crashbars or frame on full compression. Also, once you decide on what forks you want, the problems of the front wheel fitment, front brake fitment and front fender mouting arise. Different front wheel/caliper/master cylinder/front fender part are commonly used.

In the rear, increasing the ride height puts more load on the swingarm chain protector and increases wear in this area. Pay close attention to chain tension so you don't creat a tight spot in the chain as suspension compresses putting HUGE loads on the transmission output shaft.

I'm not suggesting all these modification can not be done, only that they are reasonably "extensive" and suspension being what it is today, reasonably "expensive".

________________________

Over a year ago, I had my bike set up with XR650 front forks and a spacer in the rear shock. My front end had about 11 inches of travel and I managed to solve all the front wheel/brake/fender problems adequately. The rear was raised with a spacer and remained at just over 7 in of travel in the back but the bike was balanced.



What I ultimately found was:
For my personal riding style and area, the bike was overbuilt and too tall. My riding is on pavement, gravel and dirt two-track fireroads with an occasional trip through single-track trails many of which are very tight with off-camber switchbacks. The raised bike was difficult here. Not any faster than the standard suspension and I fell over a lot more due to increased ride height.

Pavement riding was not too affected since the bike was well balanced, however mounting/dismounting with touring load and panniers was a bit...err...interesting.

If I rode in Africa or on very fast very rock/sandy tracks, the increased height would be an advantage...but is wasn't working for me.

However....the bike looked very very nice.

In the end, I lowered the bike back down using NT650 forks with a Ricor fork kit and went back to the standard RD03-like rear suspension.

I'm much happier like this, the bike is more managable and I'm actually faster and ride with less fatigue (and worry) when off-road.



But I'm still in love with Stormforces machine
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Old 12-20-2010, 01:27 AM   #8435
maxxa
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Thank you Ladder, your answer is full of useful details.
I'll read thread about Transalp modification...

For now I was advised with my friends, and read your post, and consider my riding style and needing (I like off-road) and possibility of acquisition (it's hard from Serbia)
Conclusion is:
I'll keep original forks, and original shock, but I'll change springs (put some progressive) and light my bike, and add that spacer, but not to much higher.

I'm starting today, and I'll post here what is final result.

Thank you once again!

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Old 12-20-2010, 04:37 AM   #8436
Jim Davis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ladder106 View Post
Jim,

Many thanks for the tutorial......one more question however.

-- IF soldering is the best way to make this connection, would it be even better to solder the stator wires directly to the rectifier wires?? --

I realize that this makes field repairs a bit more difficult but most people don't carry around a spare rectifier so a shop is necessary for repair anyway.

Since this part isn't replaced that often and if bad connections are the main reason for rectifier failure it seems that directly soldering the connections may be the best solution.

What am I missing?
Yes sure you can direct solder. Not my style but if you do it right you won't have to worry about the connections!

I think it'll be harder to test the alternator but you can always unsolder if necessary.
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Old 12-20-2010, 08:24 AM   #8437
A-Wind
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Indeed it is very important that soldering particularly for this application is only OK, if you know how to do it right. Otherwise the connection might break over time and any desired advantage of reliability is lost.

I say this because I see most people solder without proper technique, proper temperatures, and the right solder.
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Old 12-20-2010, 08:56 AM   #8438
Ladder106
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Maxxa,

If you are planning on using a spacer, I think there is a 3:1 ratio between shock absorber length and rear wheel movement. So a 5 mm spacer should increase rear height by about 15 mm etc.
_________________________________________________



Jim, Craig and other electronical mavins>..............

So, you guessed it, my next logical question is:

What's the best way to solder the ends of two wires together?

I built many many slot-cars from scratch with soldered tubing in my youth so I can at least, solder well.

I've searched through the internets for spicing techniques but didn't find anything that looked any different from "twist them together and solder"
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Old 12-20-2010, 10:24 AM   #8439
Africa_Twin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ladder106 View Post
Maxxa,

Jim, Craig and other electronical mavins>..............

So, you guessed it, my next logical question is:

What's the best way to solder the ends of two wires together?

I built many many slot-cars from scratch with soldered tubing in my youth so I can at least, solder well.

I've searched through the internets for spicing techniques but didn't find anything that looked any different from "twist them together and solder"
Twist them together and solder is fine as long as you use a soldering iron with enough power and take the time to heat the wires hot enough.

If you're used to soldering, then you can spot immediately a good soldering. The most important aspect in my opinion is to use good quality solder with resin core (electronic solder is this type). The resin cleans the copper and makes for a good bond. The soldering tip should be cleaned and de-greased (use a wet sponge with a bit of kitchen soap) and then rinse it in soldering resin and then tin it with a lot of solder. If the solder does not adhere to the tip, then the tip is not well cleaned (still has grease on it) so you need to redo the process.

This is really simple, rather easier to do then to describe in words. :)

Oh you might want to foresee some shrink tube to the wires BEFORE soldering them...
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Old 12-20-2010, 12:50 PM   #8440
maximuski
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Davis View Post
Before changing the R/R unit, clean its connections. These connectors are the primary reason an R/R unit fails. I mean it's solid state but it doesn't like it when connections develop high resistance.

Many people seem to ignore prevention or the actual reason for a problem, they just throw new parts at it. How many R/R units have been replaced when they are perfectly good? My guess is 95% or more...

One more thing - if you retain the original connectors and just plug in a new R/R unit, it will fail quickly. Do NOT do that. Always, and I mean always take the extra time to replace completely the connector terminals which connect the R/R to the bike.

And if you have to replace them, my suggestion is to go to a sealed heavy duty type like the Metri-Pack connectors.

One problem is people look at their connectors and they look fine to their eye. Sorry that's not good enough for pushing high currents. Just because they're not burnt to toast yet doesn't mean they're still as good as new. New is new, used is used. Cleaned up used is still used.

Remember, heat always develops in the weakest link in a circuit, that's where the resistance is highest. That means if one connector is used but clean and servicable, it will still be the point of highest resistance. What that means is that heat will develop there causing eventual arcing and burnout. Electricity is merciless and relentless. You want a high current circuit to have all connections of minimum resistance for long life.
Hi Jim
I found this RR at www.gear4bikes.com but the 4-wire connector looks different from the one I saw on you RR Swap article. (I don't have my @ with me so I can't check it)


Uploaded with ImageShack.us

I want to know if I need new connectors for this specific RR. I also saw many products at your website, can you give me the direct link of the connectors kit I would need to fit an OEM RR into my RD07?

Thanks
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Old 12-20-2010, 12:57 PM   #8441
Africa_Twin
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From the look of the connectors, I would guess it's a direct fit to the AT RD07a
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Old 12-20-2010, 04:39 PM   #8442
locorider
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Maxxa: This is where it all started. Basically a bolt, 14 x 1.5 mm and a lug from a Honda, I think. Most of the guys here used 30mm spacer, but mine is 27mm in total(including the washer). Im 5' 11" tall and a 34 inseam and I have to tip toe.

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showt...26#post8280426

Still running strong and not a low-rida!!!!


Quote:
Originally Posted by maxxa View Post
Thank you Ladder, your answer is full of useful details.
I'll read thread about Transalp modification...

For now I was advised with my friends, and read your post, and consider my riding style and needing (I like off-road) and possibility of acquisition (it's hard from Serbia)
Conclusion is:
I'll keep original forks, and original shock, but I'll change springs (put some progressive) and light my bike, and add that spacer, but not to much higher.

I'm starting today, and I'll post here what is final result.

Thank you once again!

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Old 12-20-2010, 05:50 PM   #8443
Jim Rowley
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I did the locolug mod on my TA but went with 20mm. I'm 5'-8" (1,72m) but at a recent game of musical chairs at a Christmas party, it was to my advantage.
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Old 12-20-2010, 08:49 PM   #8444
Reidy008
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Little help

Ok guys, I need to lean out my bike to pass the smog test in AZ. A little help on the carbs would be great. I would need to ajust the mixture. Any quick instructions before I start reading the manuals would be great. Cheers
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Old 12-20-2010, 09:38 PM   #8445
Ladder106
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What model AT?

Usually the idle mix. screw controls fuel on these carbs and not air.

So

Turning the screw clockwise (threading IN) reduces fuel flow and makes the bike leaner. Out is richer.

Do any local shops have exhaust monitors so you can experiment before paying for the actual test?

If you get frustrated you can just sell your bike to me. The People Republic of Kaleeforneea has not instituted smog test for motorcycles.......YET.

and yes....all my fingers were crossed and I was knocking on wood when I wrote that.....makes typing challenging.
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