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Old 12-08-2009, 10:03 PM   #46
Colebatch OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by munsonbw
I have always wondered about the key component in getting such great color and sharpness. Obviously my $200 Elf isn't up for the job, but with your D90 can you get results like yours using the "point and shoot" setting (I assume it has one)? I have way to many hobbies to be taking on photography, at least in really learning f-stops and shutter speeds, etc, but I really want to capture the better moments in life with the quality that you have.

I am not trying to derail your thread, a simple "yes, the auto setting gives these results" or "sorry, not that easy" will be helpful.

Thanks,
Ben
No, not that easy, but not as hard as you might think - but you would have to invest some time and money into learning photography basics and equipping yourself.

I wrote a bit about how I like to shoot to get the most out of a scene here on this post - but adding filters to an elf is going to be tough!:
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showp...3&postcount=89
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Old 12-11-2009, 10:13 PM   #47
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This is the best of ADV! Thank you!
My brother is thinking of us doing a Russian adventure to
Khabarovsk.
H
ow would two people loaded with gear on a two wheel drive URAL sidecar do in that environment?
Could a URAL deal with river crossings, mud holes and steep climbs better than a motorcycle?
Cheers.
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Old 12-11-2009, 10:45 PM   #48
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Your photos are breathtaking!
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Old 12-12-2009, 05:36 AM   #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RideDualSport.com
How would two people loaded with gear on a two wheel drive URAL sidecar do in that environment?
Could a URAL deal with river crossings, mud holes and steep climbs better than a motorcycle?
Cheers.
I have absolutely no experience or knowledge of side cars and what they can and cannot do. But looking at photos on ADVrider of what folks do with them I would think a rugged, well set up, combination with competant crew would be able to deal with the Tuva Trakt that we did.

There could be quite a bit of pushing and shoving in boggy bits. Rivers were not particularly deep, but some were fast flowing. A couple of climbs up the banks out of them were very steep - at least at the spots where we chose to cross as the river looked more shallow. Otherwise there were only a few short very steep climbs of no more than 50 - 100 metres.

Much depends on recent rainfall, snow melt, time of year, etc which increases river height/speed, ground surface hardness, etc.
And also the amount of "gear" you are carrying!

Although I think a sidecar outfit could follow the Tuva Trakt, I am certain it would NOT get through the BAM road - as you will see when Colebatch opens his thread of this part of the trip.
The link will be put here when the thread is opened.

In the meantime enjoy the Road of Bones/Kolyma Highway http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=529114

Tony
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Old 12-27-2009, 03:44 PM   #50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by munsonbw
Truly amazing photos. I have always wondered about the key component in getting such great color and sharpness. Obviously my $200 Elf isn't up for the job, but with your D90 can you get results like yours using the "point and shoot" setting (I assume it has one)? I have way to many hobbies to be taking on photography, at least in really learning f-stops and shutter speeds, etc, but I really want to capture the better moments in life with the quality that you have.

I am not trying to derail your thread, a simple "yes, the auto setting gives these results" or "sorry, not that easy" will be helpful.

Thanks,
Ben
I know this wasn't directed to me so forgive me for butting in however it has been my experience with a D60 (a step down from the D90) that having a slightly over cast day will give that amazing result with just the the auto settings or the mountain setting on your camera. The hardest part is when there is to much sun which burns the picture or casts shadows, or when there isn't enough light and you get grainy pixelation. So overcast weather makes for the best kind of light because it isn't direct (burning and causing shadows) yet it is bright enough to show color and depth (unlike when there isn't enough light). Bringing a good filter and a lens for close up (say 18-55) middle (55-250/300) and super long ranges (300+) is what I have found to be the best. Then yes you can pull off pictures like that with an auto setting if the environment is conducive to that kind of picture taking.
I suggest though that if it is a portrait close up use then portrait setting, if mountains use the mountain setting, if very close up use the macro setting (the flower). Hope this helps

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Old 12-28-2009, 06:11 AM   #51
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Thanks for the information Tyler. I recently started experimenting with the manual settings of my Elph. It is interesting to see the differences the various settings have. As Colebatch mentioned in his response, I have seen much better results with just underexposing pictures. It seems to help the most when the scene has a large amount of contrast between objects. I have looked at some D60's used and seem to be a good buy.
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Old 12-31-2009, 06:46 AM   #52
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Outstanding photos and narration. I guess I should of found this one before the other two. But, no matter, it's all good. Hat's off to Paul for doing all this in his 60's. I quit camping , tent wise at 62 after a hip injury. Still bothering me at 66 but not near as bad. Really envy you guys for your determination and presistance at completing these journeys.
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Old 12-31-2009, 10:11 AM   #53
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Wow........................wow.......mass envy

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Old 01-26-2010, 08:17 AM   #54
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this may be my favorite of the 3. If you do a DVD of these trips, I would definitely like a copy. How long was this portion of the trip (days)? And how often did you have to camp vs. staying in a town? I would definitely love to ride this route. The landscape is so vast! Fantastic pictures.
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Old 01-28-2010, 04:45 AM   #55
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awesome awesome stuff

its like mongolia and altai mixed together

did you hear any of the local throatsinging?
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Old 01-28-2010, 10:20 AM   #56
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Awe inspiring trip.... Richard Feynman would have loved it...
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Old 01-28-2010, 10:30 AM   #57
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colebatch
This was part of the track up to the Buguzin Pass:




The Pass:




These guys were the first people we had seen since entering Tuva


Amazing pictures!
What's with the helicopter?
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Old 01-28-2010, 10:51 AM   #58
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DogLoaf
awesome awesome stuff

its like mongolia and altai mixed together

did you hear any of the local throatsinging?
Its a lot like a cross between Mongolia and Altai, yes. If anything, even more remote and less populated than Mongolia.

No throatsinging was heard from the local males, just drunken jibberish most of the time
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Old 01-28-2010, 11:00 AM   #59
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It sounds like the Russians of done the same thing to the indigenous people that we have done to Native Americans.

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Old 01-29-2010, 12:43 AM   #60
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It sounds like the Russians of done the same thing to the indigenous people that we have done to Native Americans.

.
Depends on the people ... I found Tuva pretty unique in this aspect.

Russia's non-russian native people range from the Cossacks in the west to the Chukchi just across from Alaska, with Tatars, Udmurts, Mari, Chuvash, Bashkirs, Kalmyks, Circassians, Chechens, Tuvans, Yakuts, Buryats, Khanti, Even, and on and on. There are over 100 indigenous nationalities, and unlike North America, they aren't just different tribes of ethically and historically (largely) homogenous people, but complete different races from the fully European Cossacks to the fully Asian Buryats, each with their own very distinct language, history and culture. The language of the Mari in North Central Russia is related to Finnish and Hungarian. The language of the Yakuts in north eastern Siberia is related to Turkish. The language of the Kalmyks (in European Russia) is almost identical to Mongolian. The tapestry of native peoples in Russia is incredibly diverse. Most of the non-russian people have their own national republics as part of the Russian Federation, and schools within their respective republics teach national language and culture as well as teaching Russian language and culture.

The vast majority of those peoples are completely intermingled with normal every day life. Some like the Even and Khanti are the opposite, live way up north, herd reindeers and live in fur tents, being almost completely separated from normal russian life. And only a small number, and the Tuvans are the most extreme case, suffer from the lack of work and alcoholism that seems to afflict native peoples not just in the US, but Canada, Sweden, Finland and Australia as well. (well alcoholism beyond what is 'normal' for Russia that is).

The economic, social and cultural intermingling of most of Russia's native peoples like the Tatars, Buryats, Chuvash, Kalmyks is such that most foreigners don't even see them as "native peoples" but only as "Russians". (How many westerners see the tennis player Marat Safin as a 'non-russian' - he is a muslim Tatar)

Even among the "russians" there is a saying 'scratch a russian and you will find tatar blood' ... implying there is no such thing as 'russian' blood, as it is all so completely intermingled.

Here's a picture of Boris Yeltsin ... former Russian President. I can tell you he has a lot of non slavic blood in him, yet he is totally considered to be a Russian!



Having said that, he is a bad example when it comes to your original comment about drinking ! ;)

I am also wary of using the term indigenous peoples or native peoples too much with respect to Russia as again its a different case from North America where native peoples have been there 10,000 years and the overriding culture is one that's been there 350 years or so. The Yakuts are a case in point ... they have been in Yakutia about 700 years. The Russians have been there 400 years in Yakutia. So Yakuts are barely more 'native' than the Russians, and in any case, the Yakuts arrived and displaced the more native Even and Evenki peoples. So what do we consider the Yakuts? An indigenous people or a conquering people? The Russians have been longer in Yakutia than the Kalmyks have been in Kalmykia. It makes it much harder to apply the terms 'native' and 'indigenous'. The 'Russians' migrated east at the same time other nationalities like the Kalmyks were moving west, into European Russian territories. The movement of peoples throughout the Eurasian steppe lands is far more recent and fluid than the movement of native peoples to Australia or North America. So I would also say that Russia is very much a federation of nationalities rather than a federation of states like Australia, Canada or the US.

Tuva, perhaps because of it inaccessibility, has really suffered disproportionally from the collapse of the soviet union (I suspect because it was more subsidised than other regions), and I suspect its the economic collapse there and the total lack of jobs that has led to the excessive drinking, and reports of violence and crime. It was also a late addition to the Soviet Union (1944) and so was never as well integrated as other nationalities. Its one of the only regions that is not connected by rail to the rest of Russia, and in practise, there is only one good road in or out as well. So it remains very isolated even today. Culturally, crossing the border between the Tuvan Republic and Krasnoyarsk Territory was a big shift. The villages either side of the border line very very different in culture and feel, even though its all within "Russia". There was a feeling of safety and predictability in Krasnoyarsk that wasn't there in Tuva. Unless something is discovered to create wealth and employment there (like the mines they are building over in Mongolia) I imagine the economic gloom and alcoholism in Tuva will only continue, and disparities between Tuva and the rest of the assorted 'native' peoples will continue to grow wider.

Some curious tidbits of info about Tuvans

- Tuva is the republic with the lowest human development index score in the Russian Federation. (note other native peoples like the Yakuts, have a very high HDI score ... and average income levels higher than the average for Russia as a whole - again illustrating that the plight of the Tuvans is not so much illustrative of how the Russians treat indigenous peoples in general but is specific to Tuva)

- According to Ilya Zakharov of Moscow's Vavilov Institute of General Genetics, genetic evidence suggests that the modern Tuvan people are the closest genetic relatives to the native peoples of North and South America.
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