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Old 10-31-2009, 03:42 PM   #46
Transalp Jas
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Beautiful job. I really like the color choice.
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Old 10-31-2009, 06:34 PM   #47
DesmoDog OP
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I'm almost to the end so I'm going to post up some random things I missed along the way.

The seat was recovered by a place in New Mexico. I refinished the stock pan with some POR and black paint, then sent it off, along with the foam, to Tom Rolland. Tom is a GT fan on the bevelheads list who has had a local shop recover quite a few GT seats. They provided the new seat cover. I didn't have the trim strips so they used trim strips off a VW Bug? I'm glad I had them put on because I think they add a nice touch. The only thing I regret is using the old foam. I suppose shaping new foam would have added a lot to the cost, but the foam is 35 years old and it's not the most comfortable seat out there. it's not BAD, it could just be better.

You won't see a chainguard in these pics because the original was damaged and the one I bought off eBay doesn't fit quite right - I think it's off a later bike. I had planned on making one good guard from the two but just haven't done it yet. I suppose I could also buy a fiberglass repop.

The original turn signals were lost during the project. They were pretty beat up anyway, so I bought some black ones off of eBay. The threads were different than the originals so I bought some bolts of the right length and drilled them out for the wiring. Then I made some spacers out of black Delrin. I plan on replacing them with the correct chrome ones at some point but... these work and no one seems to notice they should be chrome, so they're not a high priority.

This picture highlights the difference in the finishes of the material, the spacers look better in real life than they do here.


Here is some detail on the front brake line. A black Galfer line that eliminated the steel tube of the original set up. It was too long as delivered, with a straight fitting. IIRC this was a very early version of the part, and the design was updated to a shorter version a few years ago.


Galfer was very helpful in modifying the line to my specifications and for a very reasonable price. They shortened it up and put an angled fitting on it. Much more better. I'm very happy with Galfer's product and customer service, top notch in my book.


The bars I have on the bike now have around 3" of rise.


Compared to the stock bars


I mentioned plating a lot of the hardware at home. I also plated some of the parts that used to be chrome. You might notice that the kickstart lever and fender stays aren't all that shiny? The chromed parts were rusty so I media blasted them and then plated them. When burnished they look more like aluminum than chrome, which was fine by me.

I think this is the last picture I took of the bike before the day I pushed it outside and started it. The pipes have been painted, the exhaust clamps are on, This was taken in March, I think at this point I was just waiting for the right day.
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Old 10-31-2009, 07:02 PM   #48
OConnor
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My wife hates it when threads like this come up.
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Old 10-31-2009, 08:42 PM   #49
DesmoDog OP
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Sunday, April 2, 2006. Here is a note I posted to the bevelheads list;

************************************************** ********
I was working on my 160 again today, and true to form was hitting delay
after delay. The kicker was when I tried to use the new acetylene tank
I had picked up, only to find the valve was messed up and there was no
way I was going to be able to open it. I was putzing around on minor
things trying to stay busy when I came across the carb synch tool I had
been looking for. Cool, I need that for when I fire up the 750.

Hey... the 750... I had recently stuffed that bike in a corner with a
cover over it, waiting for warmer weather before I try to start it up.
What the heck, the 160 isn't going anywhere, and today was about as
warm as it's supposed to get around here for a while. It's time.

I hooked up the battery, rolled it outside, poured some gas into it,
and realized I was wearing totally unsuitable footwear for the task at
hand. You guys have told too many horror stories!

After putting on some work boots that happened to be sitting nearby, I
stood beside the bike and gingerly kicked it over a couple times, key
off, no intentions of starting it. I felt kind of clumsy standing
beside the bike, so I climbed on it and turned on the key. Felt kind of
clumsy there too, so I took a few tentative kicks to get the feel of
things.

What the??? I swear I have no idea how many times I kicked it, I
wasn't even counting yet. Three times maybe? Two? They were half assed
little stabs (yeah, I now. Kick it like you mean it cuz it might kick
back...) but I'll be damned if it didn't fire up. Not a putter, cough,
silence thing. It fired up and settled in to a (very) fast idle. One
second it was quiet, the next it was rumbling away. It surprised me so
much I didn't even look at the tach, but when I looked for the idle
adjustment on the carb I noticed it was leaking oil out of the cap over
the crank on the clutch side. So I shut it off. At least I know the oil
pump works!

Turns out the cap was loose, so I tightened that up and tweaked the
idle screws about half a turn. And kicked it again. And again. Turns
out the kill switch works too. Switched it back to "run" and the bike
fired right up, and sat there rumbling away at about 1600 rpm.

It was still leaking oil so I shut it off again and went inside to get
the new cap I had, but could only find an old sealing washer. Installed
that, turned the idle down a touch more, and it fired the first kick.
Idle was around 1200 and I let it sit there a while. Blipped the
throttle a few times - no stumbles, surprisingly good throttle response
considering no work has been put into adjust the carbs or cables! I
noticed I still had a little leak on the cap, and the paint on the
pipes was starting to bubble, so I shut it off again.

So, at approx. 4:45 this afternoon, the infamous "Ugly Duc" came to
life once again, for the first time in about 20 years. It was a
surprisingly easy awakening, and while there are issues to deal with,
I'm pretty dang happy. If I had more gas to pour in it I may have even
taking it out for a little jaunt!

The weird thing was... at the time all this was happening, it started
raining. This is weird because I have a history of picking up new
vehicles in the rain. If the new toy is getting put on a trailer,
nothing. If it's started up, it rains. It's the darndest thing...

And that's my story for the day. No video to document the moment. No
website update, just a little(?) note to announce the beastie finally
makes noise, and seems quite happy to do it.

************************************************** *

I had forgotten a lot of that, and couldn't even remember if I had ridden it that first day. I guess not. I spent some time working on the carbs and test rode it a few days later.


Flash Back; December 30, 2002. The Ugly Duc project begins.


Flash Forward; April 9, 2006. Who you calling "Ugly"??? The former Ugly Duc takes it's first ride in who knows how many years.




I would post the note I sent after the first ride, but it gets long and convoluted. The short story is, the first ride wasn't all that successful. Only two gears. Hard starting. Plugs fouled. I worked it all out but suffice it to say it wasn't a hop on and go type of experience. As well as it ran the first time it fired, it ran like crap the first time I tried to ride it.

It only had two gears because I had assembled the gear selector box wrong. Easy fix. It was hard starting and poorly running because of the fouling plugs, and the plugs had fouled because of all the low speed running it did when I was adjusting the carbs. The carbs hadn't cooperated with being adjusted because it turned out the new throttle needed to be tweaked to get enough slack in the cables.

There were a lot of issues to sort out, which I expected there would be. Nothing major though, and three years after the fact I had forgotten most of them! What I DO remember is the grin I got the first time I took it out and it was running right. I remember the road and that the sun was behind me. I opened the throttle wide and smiled. None of my modern bikes ever felt like that.

Right after that I probably stabbed the rear brake while I was trying to shift, jolting me out of some mods vs rockers Hollywood fantasy, but in that moment I got it. I had never ridden a bevel twin before then, and don't remember having any doubts about spending the time and money rebuilding one, but if I DID have any doubts about it, they were all gone from that moment forward.

Since finishing the bike I've run across a couple other local 750s. Fall of '06 I went to a local meet and by coincidence pulled in right behind another 750 GT. A couple changes from the first ride - mirrors have been installed and the seat strap removed. I haven't taken many pictures of it since, but it looks pretty much the same as this.


That guy has since moved to Arizona. I went to the same event last month though, and guess what pulled in right after and parked next to me? Another 750GT. I was a little surprised, he had done some of the same mods to his as I did to mine, including the dash! I didn't take any pictures of that bike but I should have. It was a nice one, painted the way I wanted mine - a beautiful maroon with black... I'm sure I'll see it again.

I may add a few before and after pictures, and maybe list some links for resources but for the most part I think that's it for this project! Thanks for the comments and feel free to ask questions. It'll probably come as a surprise to everyone but I don't mind talking about this stuff.
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Old 10-31-2009, 08:57 PM   #50
datchew
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DesmoDog
Yep. I cheated and built the bike first, then did the posting. Expect my next project thread in about two years, covering the 160 Ducati I started a little before I got this bike on the road! Seriously though, I am pretty honest about the mistakes. The dead ends and stalls are omitted but I'm sure I can expose those in my next project thread(s). Along with the 160 Monza Jr I've got a 250 Monza project going right now. Neither one of them looks anything like a Monza anymore though!

I was thinking this was the fastest resto thread I'd ever seen until I caught on.
Frankly, I enjoyed reading all straight through without all the delays and troubles that get in the way of progress.

Looks great!!!
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Old 11-01-2009, 12:04 AM   #51
icekube1
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What he said.

Thanks for taking the time (even 3 yrs on) to post your report. Love your work, organisation and patience.

I love GT750's...they just look a bike should look, with everything completely in proportion. I remember seeing them about when new and just thinking how much cooler they were than anything else on the road (Jap or Brit was all that was about in New Zealand in those days). It's still the case with Ducati today.

I have a "I could have had one a few years ago" story as well...but will spare you that.

Well done
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Old 11-01-2009, 12:08 AM   #52
icekube1
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DesmoDog
The pipes have been painted
Have you thought about ceramic coating them?
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Old 11-01-2009, 06:05 AM   #53
DesmoDog OP
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Joined: Jun 2009
Location: Michigan, USA
Oddometer: 609
Quote:
Originally Posted by Transalp Jas
Beautiful job. I really like the color choice.
It looks a little more red here (on my monitor at least) than in real life. At first I wanted something that was an even darker maroon, but being my first paint project in quite a few years I decided to keep it simple and order a premixed color rather than a custom mix.

I'm happy with it now though.


Quote:
Originally Posted by OConnor
My wife hates it when threads like this come up.
My wife hates when a project like this shows up!


Quote:
Originally Posted by icekube1
Have you thought about ceramic coating them?
I have thought about that but I think I'd prefer a natural finish stainless. I know it turns gold when it gets hot but that's ok.
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Old 11-01-2009, 06:40 AM   #54
Reposado1800
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Do you think you could post a video of it running?
All those gears doing their thing has to be an incredible symphony.
Great job.
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Old 11-01-2009, 07:10 AM   #55
DesmoDog OP
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Location: Michigan, USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clayjars
Do you think you could post a video of it running?
All those gears doing their thing has to be an incredible symphony.
Great job.

I haven't got any video of it running and it's already put away for the year... but there are a few on YouTube of roundcases running.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a3QsvH9fzn4

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KtvxeUiXLDg

Damn I shouldn't have searched for that. Every time I see a Sport I get the urge to spend money...

Here's the only video I have of mine. It was narrated to begin with but midway through putting it together the audio got all screwed up so I deleted it and found a song that was about the right length instead. The lyrics seemed somewhat appropriate too!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Os2XqSnpyw
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Old 11-01-2009, 08:11 AM   #56
Tripletreat
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Duc Rebirth

I really enjoyed this thread. Thanks for taking the time to post it. Gorgeous bike!!! I've admired them since they were new; never understood why the SS models had people slobbering all over themselves. I'd take a GT any day....
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Old 11-01-2009, 10:23 AM   #57
SVARTH
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Fantastic job on a fantastic bike.......
Bravissimo.....!!!


I hope you enjoy riding her for many many years......




hopefully by this month, next year, my SS will be back on road too....
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Old 11-01-2009, 11:03 AM   #58
dlrides
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Great job on the build !

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Old 11-02-2009, 11:08 AM   #59
nanno
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anorak
What Suzuki is the left side assembly off of? I think my Laverda uses the same one.
Suzuki GS250/400/425/450/500/750/1000 w.o. self cancelling indicators

Cheers,
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Old 11-03-2009, 06:40 AM   #60
Poggi
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Very well done...

Quote:
Originally Posted by DesmoDog
I haven't got any video of it running and it's already put away for the year... but there are a few on YouTube of roundcases running.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a3QsvH9fzn4

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KtvxeUiXLDg

Damn I shouldn't have searched for that. Every time I see a Sport I get the urge to spend money...

Here's the only video I have of mine. It was narrated to begin with but midway through putting it together the audio got all screwed up so I deleted it and found a song that was about the right length instead. The lyrics seemed somewhat appropriate too!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Os2XqSnpyw
That second video is me and my 750.

Poggi screwed with this post 11-03-2009 at 07:32 AM
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