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Old 05-31-2015, 09:48 PM   #1
RustyStuff OP
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Got a Garden?-2015!

I can't be the only one here who like to grow some of my own food.
Anyone else wanna post up your hard, (hopefully )edible work?


Went on a spring planting binge this weekend. Built the raised beds today, potted all the other stuff yesterday-








8 tomato plants, 1 tamatillio, 4 cucumbers, 12 peppers of various types from sweet bells to Habanjero and a Thia chilli, 4 different types of sweet corn, Italian sweet Basil, Lemon Grass, 2 types of carrots, some " salad lettuces", Green beans, sweet pea's, a Soybean,Kohl Rabbi, Sweet onions,garlic, Turnips, rutabaga's, and a lone artichoke.
Also have a real monster of a rhubarb plant this year and some of the asparagus managed to hang on though last years irrigation system failure. I spread about 6 packages of giant sunflower seeds, I'm hoping to use them as a living shade wall around the patio.

Sadly the the cherries this year suck, and only one of the little sprout apple tree's set fruit. The 3 Pear's,2 Peaches,2 Apricots, Asian Pear and the other 2 apple tree's had their blooms fail or freeze.

If I can find the time this week, I'll build another planting bed.
What's everyone else growing this summer?
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Old 05-31-2015, 11:16 PM   #2
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Been working the last couple of summers trying to get the veggies sorted.
My partner planted 45 tomato plants, then found another dozen hidden at the back of the greenhouse. Everytime, I end up making supports and wind breaks - We have reasonable sun and rain but far too much wind.
Runner beans, French beans, Borlotti beans and butter beans will follow the broad beans in a month or so. Early peas are nearly ready, followed by two varieties of heritage pea, Alderman and Hurst Long Shaft. More to be planted.
Cooked and eat the first beetroot on Saturday, chantenay carrots the week before.
Lots of salad, about 6 different varieties of leaves, plus radish and spring onions/scallions.
The early strawberries are almost ready and the autumn raspberries are in flower.
Should be starting to eat the Red Duke of York early potatoes maybe late this week or into next. Trying Anya as a second early and Nicola as a main crop.
Late season carrots and parsnips for winter all showing.
Our soil tends to acidic, so liming is necessary for brassicas. I must have got the dose right as the cabbage, kales and broccoli are going like the clappers. We are trying flower sprouts for the first time this year - a cross between kale and brussel sprout. We'll see what that is like.
We are about to start our second sucession od pak choy, the first lot was a very nice addition to the "hungry gap".
We are not really warm enough for zucchini , peppers or chillies, so they have to survive in the green house, which make it a bit of a bugger if you want to pop off for a few days.

I'm trying using lots of wood chips as much to cut down on watering, so far it looks promising in the raised beds.
I have been collecting horse shit for a couple of weeks to make some more beds for next year - paper or cardboard in the bottom to supress the weeds, manure over that with wood chips on top to control humidity. Doing it in the late summer so it can do its thing over winter and be ready for planting in spring - rather than the usual rush trying to do the millions jobs which didn't get done over winter.
Good luck

I know someone who has taken photos, I'll try to post them up.
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Old 06-01-2015, 08:22 AM   #3
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Good idea for a thread RustyStuff. I just started growing some of our own veg and fruit for the first time this year.

We moved last June and had one existing raised garden box and built two more, two for veg one for fruit.

It's humble beginnings, and I'm a noob at gardening. I figure I would give it a try anyway.

Sorry for the crappy pics, but here goes.

Pic from upper floor of two garden boxes, veg and fruit.


Veg - tomatoes, onions, carrots (from seed), beets (from seed), bush beans (from seed). I think I need to thin the heard a bit.



Fruit - raspberries, blueberries, strawberries. These guys aren't doing as well as the veg. Frost may have taken its toll over the last few weeks, even though I covered them. Blueberries seemed to be hit the hardest.



Finally the last box I built along the side of the house, next to a very tough rhubarb patch. The rhubarb was planted last fall, and eaten by skunks or squirrels, then endured the coldest winter we have had. Seems to be doing ok though. The veg box has cucumbers (from seed), another tomato plant and a few more onions.



Going to get some herbs to plant in planters on the deck. Basil, cilantro, parsley...

Will keep checking this thread every once in awhile as well.

Cheers.
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Old 06-01-2015, 09:02 AM   #4
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Many herbs are bee and butterfly attractants so will help polinate the plants that need to be germinated. They also look attractive and smell nice, can be used to add flavours to your food and because they are there, you tend to use them too.
Many are very easy to grow or propagate, like thyme, mint, sage and rosemary.
Chives seem to love the cooler places and ours are now in big clumps behind hedges.
Hyssop and winter savoury drive the pollinators wild round here when they come out.
The Mediterranean soft herbs are easy too, just a little extra care to not let them chill, and you can have pots of basil - lots of varieties of that - oregeno/marjoriam in lots of colours, French tarragon (much nicer than the Russian).
Borrage, a classic in Pimms or on salads.
Dill and fennel, go really well with fish or chicken.. I mostly use them with cucumbers, I take about 1/2 the skin off in strips then thinly slice them along with red or white onion, 50/50 white vinegar&water with a couple of tbls of salt and sugar and a slack handful of dill/fennel, chopped or not to taste. Leave to steep, the salt and sugar draws out the excess moisture so the cucs stay crisp (not salty, just slightly sweet)
Very refreshing in the summer heat to come.

Great thread idea, keep 'em coming!
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Old 06-01-2015, 09:50 AM   #5
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Here's mine http://advrider.com/forums/showpost....8&postcount=63

The build thread http://advrider.com/forums/showthrea...ghlight=garden

Its been a few years now and I have the planting pretty much figured out. Last year we did well with the crops. This year I had no time to get seedlings due to work so we planted a few started plants and we'll see how they do.
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Old 06-01-2015, 10:21 AM   #6
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Our garden about a month ago.

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Old 06-01-2015, 10:48 AM   #7
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With all the deer we have here, none of those gardens would last overnight...
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Old 06-01-2015, 11:16 AM   #8
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Our garden about a month ago.

Your shep seems very happy about the garden. Or happy about something, anyway.
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Old 06-01-2015, 11:17 AM   #9
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With all the deer we have here, none of those gardens would last overnight...

same with raccoon and squirrel here. Neighbors mango tree gets raided whenever there is fruit available.
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Old 06-01-2015, 09:18 PM   #10
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With all the deer we have here, none of those gardens would last overnight...

Even though I live in a fairly rural area, the only wild animals who have been a problem are birds. All the bigger stuff stays away, mostly down by the river.
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Old 06-01-2015, 10:27 PM   #11
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With all the deer we have here, none of those gardens would last overnight...
mmmm.... venison...

squirrels are the biggest problem here... and they're not good eatin'.

4 raised beds, numerous pots...

just planted, or from starts:
beans, corn, greens (collard, kale), lettuces, cucumber (lemon & pickling), squash, radish, peppers (bell, sweet, ancho, jalapeno, habanero), tomato...

berries:
raspberries, strawberries, (6) mature blueberry bushes, some young blueberry, huckleberry, black currant...

lots of herbs and overall lots of stuff.

also have trees. cherry, pear, plum, asian pear, (2) espalier 6 way pear, espalier 6 way apple, fig. ummm... something else i'm forgetting about.

pics... i should take some.
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Old 06-02-2015, 07:59 AM   #12
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My garden theme this year is green beans and tomatoes.

Put the tomatoes in Mothers Day weekend and they are doing very well after 3 weeks.

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Old 06-02-2015, 08:22 AM   #13
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Old 06-02-2015, 12:37 PM   #14
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Great thread subject!

Started my garden late last year.



In a seasonally wet pond bottom.

Tilled and ready for fencing.


Fence up and planted


Fence is working
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Old 06-04-2015, 02:32 PM   #15
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Our Red Duke of York potatoes have been in 90 days. There is a notification of a Smith Day tomorrow or Saturday. I'll get digging in the morning.

Fenland is very flat, very agricultural, with few trees to slow the winds, so that can be our biggest problem. Had a day of 30 mph recorded Monday but with gusts a bit higher. Neighbours ash tree lost a big limb, so it may have to come down. Last year another neighbour had to remove 6 big ash trees. Really opened us up.
The wind really messed with the tall peas - all tied back now, but many stems had damage. Alderman are a wonderful flavoured pea and pretty prolific for a hertitage variety, but tall and gangly, up to 15 ft allegedly.
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