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Old 09-17-2014, 12:07 AM   #1
evermore OP
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Question Solutions for dropped bike that cannot be lifted by one person

What do people do if they drop a bike they cannot lift by themselves and no help is nearby?

Are there any mechanical aids that anyone has tried and that actually work (especially on treacherous surfaces)?


Please, no finger wagging replies that you shouldn't ride a bike you cannot lift, this is to figure out if you are in that regime.


And hey, I am hoping for some solutions that may prevent riders from hurting themselves on bikes that they can lift but shouldn't.
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Old 09-17-2014, 12:32 AM   #2
motif
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crane would be handy

seriously though they're some inflatable bags that you can put under and using air compressor lift the bike up.

Another solution is to take a shovel and dig a hole under the wheels so the bike stands up by the gravity, then fire up and ride on.
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Old 09-17-2014, 02:05 AM   #3
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http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=998290
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Old 09-17-2014, 02:51 AM   #4
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https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=I5k4Uj3YTnY
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Old 09-17-2014, 03:05 AM   #5
foxtrapper
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I practice picking up my motorcycles out in the soft grass of the back yard. Trying and mastering the various techniques you read of.

I've dragged bikes around until they are facing a better direction. Helpful when said bike is low sided across a steep hill.

I've unloaded bikes to get the weight down, especially top weight from luggage and such.

I've used small trees and such as levers, to lift heavy things.

I've stacked rocks and such under heavy things as I've lifted them.

Using all the above, I have yet to be completely unable to lift a motorcycle back upright. Though sometimes it has taken me quite a while to do so.
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Old 09-17-2014, 03:47 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flei View Post
That threat mentions the bikehoist from South Africa which seems like the right ticket. I have been thinking along the same lines and I think I have come up with a similar, more kludgy but more lightweight solution using a tripod seat and tie down ratchet straps:

1. tripod seat can support 250kg, is 75cm tall, and weighs about 2 lb. The seat would be positioned same as the bikehoist and the strap looped the top
2. tie down ratchet strap. Only one is needed.

Set up the chair by the seat, hook both ends of the ratchet strap onto the frame underneath and loop the strap over the seat and start ratcheting the bike up. It wont get you to the vertical position but that's not necessary.

I figure this solution weighs in at 4lbs total and the seat and the tiedown straps still have their primary uses as well.
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Old 09-17-2014, 05:30 AM   #7
Ernest T
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I've seen video of a 120 lb woman picking up a Gold Wing so I have to wonder what kind of bike you can't pick up? Maybe it's a matter of technique?
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Old 09-17-2014, 05:57 AM   #8
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Quote:
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I've seen video of a 120 lb woman picking up a Gold Wing so I have to wonder what kind of bike you can't pick up? Maybe it's a matter of technique?
I guess you never been offroad then, in muds, sand and sh#$@t...






when you add to the weight slippery, sticky and deep environment good luck picking your bike on your own.
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Old 09-17-2014, 06:47 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by motif View Post
I guess you never been offroad then, in muds, sand and sh#$@t...






when you add to the weight slippery, sticky and deep environment good luck picking your bike on your own.
Maybe you should just take a raft rather than inflatable bags?
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Old 09-17-2014, 07:15 AM   #10
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Make sure the bike is tipped so the tires can contact the ground and preferably against a small indent or burm. Face backwards to the bike so your ass-tail bone area contacts the edge of the seat. turn the handle bars towards the ground and grab the the handle thats now against the tank. with the other hand grab the rear subframe or something substantial. Now with your knees bent start to pick up the bike by standing up while pushing on the bike seat with your ass and just kind of walk backwards pushing the bike up. Practice this and unless you are an invalid, you will be able to pick up almost any bike. If loaded top heavy you may have to remove the high up stuff. Most of the bigger touring bikes are designed to rest at an angle that you can get your ass down low enough to do this fairly easily. It also helps if you do this immediatly after the fall over while adrenalin is still in your system from the event that caused the fall over.
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Old 09-17-2014, 07:38 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mongox View Post
Make sure the bike is tipped so the tires can contact the ground and preferably against a small indent or burm. Face backwards to the bike so your ass-tail bone area contacts the edge of the seat. turn the handle bars towards the ground and grab the the handle thats now against the tank. with the other hand grab the rear subframe or something substantial. Now with your knees bent start to pick up the bike by standing up while pushing on the bike seat with your ass and just kind of walk backwards pushing the bike up. Practice this and unless you are an invalid, you will be able to pick up almost any bike. If loaded top heavy you may have to remove the high up stuff. Most of the bigger touring bikes are designed to rest at an angle that you can get your ass down low enough to do this fairly easily. It also helps if you do this immediatly after the fall over while adrenalin is still in your system from the event that caused the fall over.
To quote my OP:
"And hey, I am hoping for some solutions that may prevent riders from hurting themselves on bikes that they can lift but shouldn't. "

I don't think I would leave on a solo trip on a bike I haven't lightened sufficiently that I can lift it myself either but why not use mechanical advantage if a good solution is available? One of those corollaries to Murphy's Law is what works in training will not work in an emergency situation ;)
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Old 09-17-2014, 08:05 AM   #12
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I only have trouble lifting mine when they are on top of me.
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Old 09-17-2014, 08:12 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by evermore View Post
What do people do if they drop a bike they cannot lift by themselves and no help is nearby?
Here's how I did it this past Sunday:

I got stuck in some mud at 9:30 AM a mile from the nearest hard pack with no cell coverage.
After working for an hour unsuccessfully trying to get the bike out myself using rope and a ratchet strap to nearby trees (350 lb. bike in thick mud),
I hiked to the nearest road, caught a ride to a place with cell coverage, and called my wife. She picked me up at 1 PM.
Drove home, ate some lunch, gathered extraction gear and supplies, and returned to park on the nearest hard pack at 4 PM.
Wife and I hiked in and extricated the bike. Hiked the extraction gear out to the car, hiked back in for the bike and rode it out.
Got home at 8 PM and started cleaning the bike, gear and clothes - skipped dinner.
Finished cleaning up at about 11 PM.

Paying 13 hours of support time for 2.5 hours of riding was sufficient incentive to dramatically reduce the probability of future similar incidents.
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Old 09-17-2014, 08:19 AM   #14
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I just got back from a trip where I dropped my bike on evert kind of unpaved surface imaginable, and I was amazed at how difficult it was to pick up sometimes. It's just a DRZ but in the wrong conditions it feels like a tank turned upside down.
One thing that helped was attaching webbing straps/loops to the frame by the seat so I could easily grab onto something as my luggage obstructed the usual grab spots. Dragging it along the ground to a better position was still sometimes necessary. In Moab, I even dragged it first into the shade.
The worst is when it's stuck upside down in a deep and narrow ditch. Only happened once, but too a long time to get out of that one. Good time to lube the chain, though...as long as the gasoline isn't pouring out.
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Old 09-17-2014, 08:32 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KenCM View Post
Here's how I did it this past Sunday:

I got stuck in some mud at 9:30 AM a mile from the nearest hard pack with no cell coverage.
After working for an hour unsuccessfully trying to get the bike out myself using rope and a ratchet strap to nearby trees (350 lb. bike in thick mud),
I hiked to the nearest road, caught a ride to a place with cell coverage, and called my wife. She picked me up at 1 PM.
Drove home, ate some lunch, gathered extraction gear and supplies, and returned to park on the nearest hard pack at 4 PM.
Wife and I hiked in and extricated the bike. Hiked the extraction gear out to the car, hiked back in for the bike and rode it out.
Got home at 8 PM and started cleaning the bike, gear and clothes - skipped dinner.
Finished cleaning up at about 11 PM.

Paying 13 hours of support time for 2.5 hours of riding was sufficient incentive to dramatically reduce the probability of future similar incidents.
Ouch, that sounds like a day from hell. Do you think there was any gear you could have reasonably taken to help get yourself out? Mud has got to be the worst surface to deal with..
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