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Old 10-04-2011, 10:24 PM   #526
Don Coyote
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I hear the wasps are building their nests high, the badgers are fat, and my corns 'r a achin, so it must be time to prepare for a harsh winter.

Has anyone experimented with various chain lube techniques and found a difference specific to winter conditions? I know i was running the Dupont clear stuff when my current chain went on, but at some point the switch was made to Maximum Chain Guard. Unfortunately all of my lab notes on their respective performance were lost in the fire...
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Old 10-05-2011, 07:54 AM   #527
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I make a mixture of 75% ATF 25% Kerosene for my scottoiler in the winter and bump the drip rate up to 2 drips per minute instead of 1
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Old 10-05-2011, 08:05 AM   #528
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Don Coyote View Post
I hear the wasps are building their nests high, the badgers are fat, and my corns 'r a achin, so it must be time to prepare for a harsh winter.

Has anyone experimented with various chain lube techniques and found a difference in winter conditions? I know i was running the Dupont clear stuff when my current chain went on, but at some point the switch was made to Maximum Chain Guard. Unfortunately all of my lab notes on their respective performance were lost in the fire...
If you don't want a mess stick with the DuPont.

The Maximum Chain Guard isn't. It attracts dirt and contaminants which create premature wear on the o-rings... = reduces the life of your chain.
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Old 10-06-2011, 06:38 PM   #529
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Hi all! First post here....

Took me nearly a week but I did read this entire thread. Thanks for the education. :salute: I have a KLR 650 and am planning on a separate set of rims where I can rotate studded tire/wheel assmebly on and off as needed. I commute 350 to 400 miles per week between my two jobs and am concerned about wearing down studs prematurely. So, hoping I can swap new wheels off and on as needed. Front wheel has just been purchased and am scouring for a rear.


Are most of you who have done this simply using a 3/16 drill bit? In a fast drill or in a die grinder? I have both. Ive also seen a pic somewhere online of someone using a rotary rasp or burr type bit. Any input on that? I noticed the holes in car tires that are drilled are significantly smaller than 3/16. Im assuming the holes dont end up being that big because of the pliability of the rubber?
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Old 10-06-2011, 06:50 PM   #530
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^ What he said. I found a local tire shop that will stud some tires for me if I drill them. I need to review this thread and figure out exactly what size hole for automotive studs, placement, and what glue. And I have got to decide what tire to use. I was thinking K270's because that is what I run all the time anyway and I am familiar with their gription. Plus they're cheap, like me

I had better hurry and figure it out, the first snow of the season was today. Several inches of very wet, heavy snow. I don't think it will last long, but I have a mess of broken branches to clean up.
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Old 10-06-2011, 07:04 PM   #531
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Originally Posted by luke-gr View Post
Took me nearly a week but I did read this entire thread. Thanks for the education. :salute: I have a KLR 650 and am planning on a separate set of rims where I can rotate studded tire/wheel assmebly on and off as needed. I commute 350 to 400 miles per week between my two jobs and am concerned about wearing down studs prematurely. So, hoping I can swap new wheels off and on as needed. Front wheel has just been purchased and am scouring for a rear.


Are most of you who have done this simply using a 3/16 drill bit? In a fast drill or in a die grinder? I have both. Ive also seen a pic somewhere online of someone using a rotary rasp or burr type bit. Any input on that? I noticed the holes in car tires that are drilled are significantly smaller than 3/16. Im assuming the holes dont end up being that big because of the pliability of the rubber?
don't use a regular twist but, use one that bores a flat hole at the bottom, drill holes 10mm deep and use 10mm studs.iirc, I used s 3/32 bit

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Old 10-06-2011, 07:33 PM   #532
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FloorPoor View Post
^ What he said. I found a local tire shop that will stud some tires for me if I drill them. I need to review this thread and figure out exactly what size hole for automotive studs, placement, and what glue. And I have got to decide what tire to use. I was thinking K270's because that is what I run all the time anyway and I am familiar with their gription. Plus they're cheap, like me
Glue? You can use water or some lube, but glue isn't necessary.

I also remember having a hard time seating studs in the K270. I'm not sure what the real problem was.
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Old 10-06-2011, 08:25 PM   #533
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Randyo, I believe I know the ones you mean....they have the same side flutes but point is different.....almost looks like there are three points on the end. Makes sense to have as flat a bottom as possible.

I just re-checked Dysco's stud page. He says 3/16" I remember a reference elsewhere about someone who used a 5/32. That was the person that used the burr I believe. Not the end of the world. I'll do some test holes on current tire first. :)

FloorPoor, I also looked at the 270 since it looked to be a bit lessknobby. With my 60 mile commute Im not sure Im looking forward to the Trakmaster on dry roads. I read a couple warnings here about the 270 and decided not to try it. Ive seen references to loctite being an acceptable and recommended glue by the manufacturers but rarely is it used.

Another question: When deciding how deep of a stud can be used in various tires, do I measure just the height of the tread block? Can the stud sink into the tire casing any appreciable distance?
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Old 10-06-2011, 10:24 PM   #534
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Originally Posted by luke-gr View Post

FloorPoor, I also looked at the 270 since it looked to be a bit lessknobby. With my 60 mile commute Im not sure Im looking forward to the Trakmaster on dry roads. I read a couple warnings here about the 270 and decided not to try it.
Were the warnings you read stud related, or just handling in general?

I have put around 18,000 miles on 270's and I love them. I get 6,000+ miles out of a front and around 4,000 from a rear. They are excellent in all off road conditions except for sticky clay/mud and the only disadvantage on road is you cant rail on the twisties. They tend to feel a little iffy on high speed, steep lean corners, but I have never had one break loose on the pavement. They do feel very squirmy for the first 200 miles on a new one, but after that they are very predictable. 20 psi front, 24 psi rear works best in almost all conditions. And at around 100 bucks for a pair, it is hard to beat the bang for the buck! I would recommend them if you ride much dirt, unless your commute has lots of canyon carving.
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Old 10-06-2011, 10:41 PM   #535
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The T-63 looks like a good candidate for studding that's more streetable. I have a set that I might stud up but we don't get a lot of snow here. Wish I had a second set of wheels.
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Old 10-07-2011, 01:31 AM   #536
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DAKEZ View Post
If you don't want a mess stick with the DuPont.

The Maximum Chain Guard isn't. It attracts dirt and contaminants which create premature wear on the o-rings... = reduces the life of your chain.
That's mostly what I'm trying to recall. I think I changed over because the chain was showing rust using the DuPont teflon stuff. The Maxima lube may be messy, but it seems the extra gunk has done more to preserve the chain than wear it. I'm at 16K+ miles and have had not noticeable chain sag to date. The Maxima sure does dump a lot of lube on the rear rim and other parts.

I should say that I'm without a garage and parking on the street year round. The DuPont might work better if it were easier to work on the chain more regularly...
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Old 10-07-2011, 02:13 AM   #537
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Quote:
Originally Posted by luke-gr View Post
Are most of you who have done this simply using a 3/16 drill bit? In a fast drill or in a die grinder? I have both. Ive also seen a pic somewhere online of someone using a rotary rasp or burr type bit. Any input on that? I noticed the holes in car tires that are drilled are significantly smaller than 3/16. Im assuming the holes dont end up being that big because of the pliability of the rubber?
Back when studs were just starting to be used here in the U.S. it was hard to find tires with molded-in holes for studs, so we had to drill most of our tires and stud them ourselves. A high speed air drill (10,000 rpm or more) was the recommended tool. No longer needing to drill several thousand holes every season (and, thankfully, haven't had to for over 40 years) I now just take a 1/8" standard bit, break it off short, and insert it into a die grinder (Dremel tool works well too) so the bit extends the same amount as the length of the stud. Takes less than 2 seconds per hole.

To make inserting the stud easier, I used to dribble a little rubber lube down the tube that held the studs on the stud gun. If feeding the studs individually, some rubber lube in a small spray bottle, applied to the holes rather liberally, a few holes at a time, works fine. If you don't have rubber lube handy, rubbing alcohol also is a good rubber lubricant, but it evaporates pretty rapidly, so you have to apply it more frequently.
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Old 10-07-2011, 02:17 AM   #538
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I hear the wasps are building their nests high, the badgers are fat, and my corns 'r a achin, so it must be time to prepare for a harsh winter.

Has anyone experimented with various chain lube techniques and found a difference specific to winter conditions? I know i was running the Dupont clear stuff when my current chain went on, but at some point the switch was made to Maximum Chain Guard. Unfortunately all of my lab notes on their respective performance were lost in the fire...
Using a Hawkeoiler on my KLR, and Mobil 1 75W-90 gear lube for chain oil, so that works fine at all temperatures - or at least at any temperatures I expect to be riding the KLR, including down to zero F. Colder than that, I'll be on the Wing, with a lot more plastic in front of me to break the breeze, and a shaft drive.
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Old 10-07-2011, 07:05 AM   #539
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Quote:
Originally Posted by luke-gr View Post
Randyo, I believe I know the ones you mean....they have the same side flutes but point is different.....almost looks like there are three points on the end. Makes sense to have as flat a bottom as possible.

I just re-checked Dysco's stud page. He says 3/16" I remember a reference elsewhere about someone who used a 5/32. That was the person that used the burr I believe. Not the end of the world. I'll do some test holes on current tire first. :)

FloorPoor, I also looked at the 270 since it looked to be a bit lessknobby. With my 60 mile commute Im not sure Im looking forward to the Trakmaster on dry roads. I read a couple warnings here about the 270 and decided not to try it. Ive seen references to loctite being an acceptable and recommended glue by the manufacturers but rarely is it used.

Another question: When deciding how deep of a stud can be used in various tires, do I measure just the height of the tread block? Can the stud sink into the tire casing any appreciable distance?
mighta been 5/32, yes, its was a burr bit

tires I used were Karoo Ts, harder rubber than other tyires my buddy was used to studding, took about 100 miles of riding to get the studs seated
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Old 10-07-2011, 07:32 PM   #540
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FloorPoor, the warnings I read (maybe from Dysco) were about difficulty in installing the studs due to rubber compound. I remember the info being a bit vague. (??)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dysco View Post
The T-63 looks like a good candidate for studding that's more streetable. I have a set that I might stud up but we don't get a lot of snow here. Wish I had a second set of wheels.
Those seem at a doable price point. I remember noting those while perusing the catalogs. Looks like those have approximately 10mm tread depth? Being that you have a set, is it the same depth front and rear? Is that enough depth? Shortest stud that I see Bruno Wessel listing is 10mm length? I sure dont want to end up with a set of tires that wont work. Like I said, if I have reservations about a tire working I'll default to the Trakmaster presuming I come up with a secondary rear wheel.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alcan Rider View Post
Back when studs were just starting to be used here in the U.S. it was hard to find tires with molded-in holes for studs, so we had to drill most of our tires and stud them ourselves. A high speed air drill (10,000 rpm or more) was the recommended tool. No longer needing to drill several thousand holes every season (and, thankfully, haven't had to for over 40 years) I now just take a 1/8" standard bit, break it off short, and insert it into a die grinder (Dremel tool works well too) so the bit extends the same amount as the length of the bit. Takes less than 2 seconds per hole.

To make inserting the stud easier, I used to dribble a little rubber lube down the tube that held the studs on the stud gun. If feeding the studs individually, some rubber lube in a small spray bottle, applied to the holes rather liberally, a few holes at a time, works fine. If you don't have rubber lube handy, rubbing alcohol also is a good rubber lubricant, but it evaporates pretty rapidly, so you have to apply it more frequently.
Thank you. Sounds like youve seen a tire stud or two. Funny, Ive now seen recommendations on drill bits from 4/32 to 6/32. I reckon rubber has some margin of error. I have buddies at a tire store who are going to let me experiment with their gun. Your technique makes good sense. When you say rubber lube, you referring to the stuff they use to mount the tires?
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