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Old 01-21-2015, 08:21 AM   #1
MassiveLee OP
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An Africa Twin thru France, Spain, Italy and Tunisia

I am from Montreal, bought a first year RD03 Africa Twin in France and spent five weeks in France, Spain, Italy and Tunisia. Here are teaser pictures. The ride report follows.

















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1982 Honda 500 Ascot FT / 1986 Honda 750 Nighthawk S / 1988 Honda 1000 Hurricane / 1990 Honda CBR1000F
2001 BMW K1200RS aka Good Girl -- Current
2006 BMW R1150GSA aka Kim Kardashian -- Current
1988 Honda Africa Twin aka Queen of Sheeba -- Current

MassiveLee screwed with this post 01-21-2015 at 08:29 AM
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Old 01-21-2015, 08:23 AM   #2
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The preparation

Preparing the trip.

My 2014 riding season ended with 38,000km done in Canada and shared between my 2006 R1150GSA and my 2001 K1200RS. The season couldn't just end like that. So starting in early September, I looked for something extra. The icing on the cake. The cherry on the sunday. The trip that would "fullfill my soul" and make me a better person ;-). It had to be on another continent and definitely in another culture. Being born in France in 1962, I moved to Tunisia at the 3 or 4 month mark and stayed there until Spring 1968. And never returned, even though I fantasized about it for the past 40 years. So, I had a goal. I would rediscover a country I once knew, and I would look for the house where I lived almost 50 years ago in Sfax. I will definitely travel to Tunisia. Then I had to find a bike. I could either ship the GS to France back and forth, or simply buy a bike in France. But which one? Certainly not a GS. Way too heavy for soft ground. And it had to be older than 15 years if I wanted to import it. What bike did I missed in my youth, and which one was a landmark? Not too difficult to decide in my case. It had to be a Honda Africa Twin, and one from the first serie. 1988-1989. 650cc carbed V twin liquid cooled engine. A motor that has the reputation to be bulletproof. I started to look in France's equivalent of Kijiji or Craigslist : www.leboncoin.fr

Then I knew I wanted the most perfect bike with the lowest mileage. But guess what? I wasn't the first to realize how important the RD03 was in the history of motorcycle and prices were up there in France (in the 2000 euros), and even higher in Germany and Italy (2,500-3,000 euros for superb exemples). So, I made the gamble to find the cheapest bike in the best condition and ended up with a 900 Euros 130,000km Africa Twin. Time proved my gamble would work. espeially that after such an adventure, the bike would be disassembled anyway for clean-up and adjustments.

So, I found the bike, then I renewed the passport, booked a plane from Montreal to Paris. I would then reach to Southern France by train.

Here's the bike. Decent shape. Cheap. And I won't cry if I crash it in the desert.





Bike was decent and located in Southern France. Being a dry climate, it was insurance the frame and subframes were not eaten by rust like many exemples I had scene. I emailed the guy and made an appointment for sometimes in early December. The seller would keep the bike for me. Then I had to enquire through friends and contatcts about what was needed to buy, register and insure a motorcyle in France when coming from outside the EU. It is in fact quite simple and straightforward.

1- Before leaving, have an international driving licence issued. Cost is $25.00cad
2- You need to secure an address in France. Could be family or friend. Or even the seller's address if he agrees.
3- This person will give you an act of sale on official paper
4- A section of the "carte grise" or registration as we call it in North America.

So far, we have four forms. Your international driving licence. One that attests of your French address (basically where your speeding tickets will be mailed), an act of sale and a signed registration.

After purchasing the bike, you go to the "prefecture" and transfer ownership of the vehicle for the price of around 60 Euros. The bike is now yours. The licence plate on the bike stays and is now yours too. There's a catch though. It takes 4 days to receive the new "carte grise" and it will be shipped at your French adress.

Then you need to insure the bike. The insurance will be valid throughout the EU as well as Morocco and Tunisia. Not sure about Algeria. Some North American insurers will cover you in Europe. Check with your broker. I got my insurance from France. I needed the bike's registrations, history of insurance that I got from my Canadian insurance broker, and history of driving, which I had from my local DMV. In all three cases it makes sense. The insurer wants to know if you own the bike, if you have made insurance claims and if you are a good rider. They give you your proof of insurance, you pay. You're done and free to go.



I am a few steps ahead of real life. I knew I would make a trip on an unknown bike. So I searched around what ould break on an RD03 and bought spares from Montreal : fuel pump, voltage regulator (upgraded to a mosfet unit), clutch and throttle cables. While I was buying spares, I also looked for ways to carry them. Soft or hard luggages? Soft is great for going off road. But they can be nicked with a razor blade and you basically end up with nothing. Therfore on this 5 week trip, I had to find aluminum panneirs and sturdy racks. This is where I found my stuff in Romania at www.heavyduties.ro

These guys had an execellent reputation for service and quality. I emailed them for some racks, alu panniers and crash bar. They would be shipped to my French address. Not only the products are top notch, the same level as Touratech panniers, but they cost 75% less ;-) Order is placed with the assurance it will be there by Dec 7th. Crash bars, racks and fully optionned panniers (liners, straps and mounting harware) for 530 Euros... ;-)

About a month before leaving, I started mocking up my traveling luggage. Planning a month ahead was definitely needed. I made perhaps 20 versions of how to pack my stuff. Tent, sleeping bag, mattress, BMW jacket and pants, spares, 15kg of tools, and clothes. Let's not forget the helmet. Airplane regulations limit to 23kg the weight of the main luggage while you can carry a cabin handbag that weights no more than 12kg, plus hand held laptop. I ended up about 0.2kg short of the weight limit, with having to wear the riding suit while traveling by plane and train to make everything fit in the bags. ;-)





Ready to go. Leaving in ahour.





Airplane food was, well, airplane food. Air France did not really shine.



I arrived at Charles De Gaule airport in the early morning, North of Paris, and had to carry 35kg of luggages throught out the RER train and subway networks to the Gare de Lyon train station, South of Paris. It proved to be very difficult and I suffered for many reasons. I was entering a complex transit system I had no clue how it worked. Buying tickets, finding directions. And I was a mule carrying heavy stuff. I ws definitely sweaty, with a fried brain. ;-)



Reached Gare de Lyon and waited for my train to Southern France.

__________________
1982 Honda 500 Ascot FT / 1986 Honda 750 Nighthawk S / 1988 Honda 1000 Hurricane / 1990 Honda CBR1000F
2001 BMW K1200RS aka Good Girl -- Current
2006 BMW R1150GSA aka Kim Kardashian -- Current
1988 Honda Africa Twin aka Queen of Sheeba -- Current
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Old 01-21-2015, 08:24 AM   #3
MassiveLee OP
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The adventure begins

So, after 10 hours of airport and planes, 2 hours of public transportation and 3 hours of train, I ended up in a small town in Southern France called Bollène. This is where my bike is waiting for me, ready to go. From Bollène, I would then ride 800km toward France's Atlantic Coast, to Larochelle, to visit my mother and wait 4 or 5 days to get the paperwork transfer done to my name. Or so I thought...

France still pays tribute to its Resistant forces during WW2. They were called "Partisans" by the Frenh as well as the Brits and were under General De Gaule's orders in exile in Great Britain. Germans simply called them "terrorists". This stone plate in memory of local resistants was at the train station in Bollène.



I hoped the seller would be waiting for me as I had no clue how to get to his place. No chance. The train station is in fact closed. Called a cab and went straight to the address I was given. Knock knock. Nobody. I go around the back.

The bike was in the barn. Somebody shows up.





Right by a dusty Velosolex.



The seller, a cop (CRS to be more precise - Compagnie Républiaine de Sécurité) was on duty about 200km away, but his wife would make sure the transaction would go well. I started the bike, inspected it to realize it was not exactly as advertized. Supposedly never dropped. Lots of scratches and dings for a bike that was never dropped. Wifey tells me it was never dropped by this owner. But she has no clue about past owners of this 26 year old bike... ;-) Started making quick calculation to reduce the price from the 1200 Euros asked. Then the first bad news. The lady went to the prefecture in the morning to get the paperwork done so that the bike would be under her hubby's name as it is currently (and for the past year) still under previous owner's name. But as it is Wednesday, the service at the prefecture was closed. She would go tomorrow in the morning. Damn. Here goes my schedule. Losing my first day. So, I stayed at their home, along with 5 teenagers with whom I had fun as the bigger brother... ;-) I spent the evening checking the bike. Tacho is not working. Both side covers under the seat are cracked. The lock on the side cover is not working, the gate holds with red tape.

In the morning I wake up and the lady is already gone to do the paperwork. More time spent discussing with the brady bunch ;-) Lady comes back around 1PM. No good news here. She doesn't have the paperwork with her. It would be mailed by the prefecture and she shall get them in 5 days, then she will express them to me by mail. So, here goes a full week out the window on top of the expected 5 days. I then had no problem dealing the price down to 900 Euros. I packed the the bike and left toward La Rochelle. That very old town once was at the heart of the war between Protestants and Catholics. It happenned in the 17th century and it was a very bloody war. Paris and Cardinal de Richelieu had decided that France would be Catholic and the power would be in Paris. Richelieu starved to death the inhabitants of La Rochelle for 13 months...

Of course, the fuel tank was almost empty. First fill up on the highway. The clerck was ecstatic to see a rare 26 years old Africa Twin. Respect, man. I so love travelling with a motorcycle. People easily open up to you. It is so much easier to share and discuss. ;-)





So, it is around 3PM and I have 800km to cover. It absolutely needs to be done on the highway. It is 800km of pay toll. The price of fuel was an expected shock. Twice as much as in Canada. 1.5 euros per litre. But the biggest shock would come from how much it will cost me to cover those 800km on such beautifull highways. Later on that.



Yessss. This is MY Africa Twin. ;-)



I cover 100s of km and by around 8PM I was starving. So, here'S one of France's great side. While we are used to eat hamburgers with frieds, washed with Coca Cola, in France, highway restaurants serve you "canard confit avec pommes de terre rissolées à l'ail et ratatouille". I am starting to love France. 140km/h highways and great food for my belly.









Around midnight, another stop to relieve my bladder.



It is finally around 2AM when I reach Larochelle. I go straight to a nice small hotel where I had a reservation (it is a complicated story why I am not staying at my mother's ;-) )

In the morning, my breakfast goes like that.



I have a garage to store the bike and work on it. Some spares had been shipped from various suppliers.



Crashbars and racks. Panniers, and original Honda center stand.



Basic tools I brought from Montreal. Time will show that they won't be needed after the parts installation. The AT is a great reliable bike.





Touratech quality at 25% de price.





Started removing parts to fit the center stand and luggages. I will also flush oil and do brake fluid.



I fitted a rack I had designed for this occasion. The prototype proved to be an almost perfect fit. It will be easy to tie the drybag or fuel jugs if needed.



Fitted the tank bag with a strap system I assembled in Montreal. It works. Love my Wolfman tank bag.







GPS cradles and USB connectors are fitted. Gotta love the RAM mounts.









__________________
1982 Honda 500 Ascot FT / 1986 Honda 750 Nighthawk S / 1988 Honda 1000 Hurricane / 1990 Honda CBR1000F
2001 BMW K1200RS aka Good Girl -- Current
2006 BMW R1150GSA aka Kim Kardashian -- Current
1988 Honda Africa Twin aka Queen of Sheeba -- Current
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Old 01-21-2015, 08:26 AM   #4
MassiveLee OP
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11 days to kill

As I have almost 14 days to kill, might as well visit this very charming city with centuries of history. If you guys think that Montreal and Quebe city are sooooo old and Frenchie, then I suggest you visit La Rochelle. If I am not mistaken, it was founded in the XIth century. Stone carving is spectacular. Not to mention that a vast portion of the French people that migrated to the New World in the 17th and 18th centuries left thru the port of Larochelle. ;-)







Okay. The bike is ready to go now, but I have no paperwork. Can't go too far. I will therefore spend the next 11 days idling. A few days later, I received the papers to the owner's name. Then I could transfer ownership to me. Will have to wait 5 days to get them. Thenwill insure the bike. My throat starts aching and I spend nights coughing. Uh oh.

I keep on doing the tourist in Larochelle. They have a small zoo for kids in a park. That's a century long French tradition. Love it.















So. Because of delays, I have to cancel the Moroccan part of my trip. I won't be closer to Morocco than this plate with merguez sausages. Damn that was good. ;-)









I wanted to have some of this delicacy for 40 years. They are called "tarte tropézienne". I bought two.



And then I was ambushed.



The public plaza had lot of activity. Even for kids. So cute.





Later, I stumbled onto this very cute store. They specialize in canned "sardines".









Another ambush.



France is expensive. A single pastry is around $6.00usd



Then headed to a supermarket to buy another GPS



.. and stumbled on the dessert alley. This side shows the selection of "crèmes dessert". Facing this display, the whole alley is milk products : yogourts and stuff. While cheeze, cream and butter are on another alley.



Here's what I bought. If everyone on earth could have those, there would be no more war.



One evening I felt hungry and found that. Sure. A simple food truck. Pizza on the go. But wait.





The oven is a wood oven.





Anchovies, olives and cheeze.



Remember my sore throat and nights spent standing up, coughing my lungs? Well, I went to the doc. I have a bronchitis. We are December 21nd and I have a bronchitis. I am prescribed antibiotics, cortizone and some coughing syrup. The day after, I receive my own "carte grise". Haleluja!!! I now have to overcome the bronchitis. ;-)

After I changed the old Anakke tires with Mitas E07, I found my front caliper had a stuck piston. I posted an emergency call on an Africa Twin forum. I needed a single piston and a seal kit for tomorrow. And guess what? Somebody had them and expressed them to me. I shall get them by the 23rd.





On the 23rd and after a good night sleep without spitting my lungs, I received my caliper parts, as well as this :



That means that once I put the front caliper back together and bleed the brakes, I am ready to go. So, by December 24th, the morning of Christmas Eve, I was all packed up and ready to go. It is 8AM, cold and rainy and aiming South toward Spain. The adventure begins. Too bad I spent 13 days waiting. No Morocco. No Andalusia. So, let's go visit Barcelona and see the "Familia Sagrada"
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1982 Honda 500 Ascot FT / 1986 Honda 750 Nighthawk S / 1988 Honda 1000 Hurricane / 1990 Honda CBR1000F
2001 BMW K1200RS aka Good Girl -- Current
2006 BMW R1150GSA aka Kim Kardashian -- Current
1988 Honda Africa Twin aka Queen of Sheeba -- Current
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Old 01-21-2015, 08:27 AM   #5
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Started in the wet and cold morning of December 24th with the intention of reaching Pampeluna (at least) and maybe beyond. The whole ride is done outside of pay tolls. Back roads (mostly) and a few stretches of free highways.

When traveling in Europe, you get to reconsider what is deemed "old" in North America. There's history everywhere, at every stop and each corner.



















Now for some innovation that I only previously saw in Western Canada. A fuel station with no clerk. In Western Canada, it is only available to businesses thru a Card Lock system. In France and Spain, you can get your fuel with your credit card. No clerk in sight.







Had to stop North of Bordeau. I was exhausted and cold, not to mention I needed to take my medications. I was coughing a bit but nothing excessive. I kept going South, expecting a border to tell me I was crossing into Spain. No luck. This is Europe. I crossed the Pyrenées and then headed to Pampeluna. It was around 4PM and it started being cold.









Yup. It seems the seals on the clutch pivot are dead. Small oil leak. Now the sun was starting to disapear but I wanted to go further East. The more I can do today, the less I'll have to do tomorrow, and more time to spend in Barcelona. Very few cars on the road. Maybe because we are Christmas Eve. Wanting to stop for an hotel room and food. Everything is closed. And it is getting dark and colder. I cross a small town, go thru a bridge then track back onto the same gridge to get stopped by Spanish cops. I have no clue whay as I was rding slow thru the village. They check my papers and then tell me I didn'T do my stop... Well, I didn't see a stop sign. Then he explains to me that if approchaing a narrow bridge, I must stop if a car isd already on the bridge and wait until it leaves the bridge. In my case, I didn't stop... twice. First on the way to the East, then on the way back. Okay sir. I apologize, I didn't know. he lets me go understanding I am a foreign rider and hionestly didn't know about this situation. I leave toward Huesca. It is very cold, around the freezing point and very humid. Thick fog, nightime and very curvy roads don't mix. So I am looking for a place to sytop. I need a bed and food. 10, 20, 30 kms pass and nothing. Then out of nowhere I spot an open restaurant and hotel. Only a few cars are parked but there'S some light. I backtrack, park and enter the lobby. A few guys at having a drink at the bar and as I enter the room I clearly feel like an alien walking in. I am asking for (una habitacion y comida". No problem but we need to hurry as we are closing very soon for Christmas.

Never did pasta and lamb chops taste so good. Paid my dues, everyone is leaving and get shown my room. Perfect. I will abuse the shower's hot water. Good night and merry Christmas y'all. ;-)











__________________
1982 Honda 500 Ascot FT / 1986 Honda 750 Nighthawk S / 1988 Honda 1000 Hurricane / 1990 Honda CBR1000F
2001 BMW K1200RS aka Good Girl -- Current
2006 BMW R1150GSA aka Kim Kardashian -- Current
1988 Honda Africa Twin aka Queen of Sheeba -- Current
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Old 01-21-2015, 09:24 AM   #6
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Ha ha! Glad you are enjoying France! Yes, petrol prices are way up compared to North America! I love hitting those "regional products" shops - they often have things you just don't find anywhere else, even in the "regular" shops in the same town. The sardines shop just killed me! A whole store! But those prices....wow! I don't think I could ever bring myself to pay 20 Euros for a can of tuna! And according to the shelf sign, that was the "factory price." Ha ha...a sardines "outlet store"! The pastries are spendy true, but look at how beautiful they are! In NYC, where and when you can find such things, I think the prices are comparable. La Rochelle....missed it on my last visit but thanks to you it is on the list! The first Dutch ship to bring colonists to Manhattan was filled with people from La Rochelle! The NYC suburb of New Rochelle was founded by some of these folks (or their descendants), and there is still an active French church in NYC that dates from this early immigration. Sorry to hear about the delays getting the trip going, but you are making the best out of a less than ideal situation. Just makes it more of an adventure, eh? Looking forward to your next installment!
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Old 01-21-2015, 09:39 AM   #7
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Ooooh! First to subscribe!

This should be good winter reading.



Gaaaah! Second to subscribe.
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Old 01-21-2015, 09:57 AM   #8
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Subscribed !

You've got a follower from France and, as I am born the same year as you, I had to subscribe !

Do you have French citizenship as you were born in France ?

Thanks for the nice report. It's really interesting to read what surprised you in your own country of birth.
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Old 01-21-2015, 10:37 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Olirider View Post
Subscribed !
Do you have French citizenship as you were born in France ?

Thanks for the nice report. It's really interesting to read what surprised you in your own country of birth.
I have dual citizenship. French (since birth) and Canadian (since 1976).
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1982 Honda 500 Ascot FT / 1986 Honda 750 Nighthawk S / 1988 Honda 1000 Hurricane / 1990 Honda CBR1000F
2001 BMW K1200RS aka Good Girl -- Current
2006 BMW R1150GSA aka Kim Kardashian -- Current
1988 Honda Africa Twin aka Queen of Sheeba -- Current
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Old 01-21-2015, 10:43 AM   #10
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Sticker shock. 1.5 Euros for a liter of fuel was expected. Paying 65 Euros in tolls to cover 800km was, well, a bit over my expectations. This is $100.00cad or around $85.00usd. What happened is that a decade ago, or so, the French government didn't have the budget to maintain its highways. So, they decided to make some cash by selling the rights to exploit them to the private sector... So, while in all my life, I never spent $100.00cad in total in highway fees, then one evening in France and keshing... Here it goes.

Lee
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1982 Honda 500 Ascot FT / 1986 Honda 750 Nighthawk S / 1988 Honda 1000 Hurricane / 1990 Honda CBR1000F
2001 BMW K1200RS aka Good Girl -- Current
2006 BMW R1150GSA aka Kim Kardashian -- Current
1988 Honda Africa Twin aka Queen of Sheeba -- Current
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Old 01-21-2015, 11:18 AM   #11
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Hi MassiveLee,

Looks like the start of a great ADVenture and RR.... I'm in

You certainly took a chance on the old Africa Twin, but looks like a decent machine for all of 900 Euros.
Yep, those French cake shops are superb, no doubt about it
I was in La Rochelle last year, but recon you know it better than most after your prolonged stay.

Looking forward to more.

Cheers
Potski

I'm in the Pyrenees btw.
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Old 01-21-2015, 12:05 PM   #12
nichloasjerry1
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Love the trip report so far! Paris looks beautiful. I gotta question about your saddlebags, how long have you had them installed ? my bags from vikingbags are finally starting to show a little wear, and I don't feel comfortable going on overnight trips :P looking for somewhere to start my search http://www.vikingbags.com/motorcycle-luggage.htm
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Old 01-21-2015, 12:33 PM   #13
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Great report!! Can't wait to see more...

DW
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Old 01-21-2015, 12:35 PM   #14
MassiveLee OP
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Originally Posted by nichloasjerry1 View Post
Love the trip report so far! Paris looks beautiful. I gotta question about your saddlebags, how long have you had them installed ? my bags from vikingbags are finally starting to show a little wear, and I don't feel comfortable going on overnight trips :P looking for somewhere to start my search http://www.vikingbags.com/motorcycle-luggage.htm
Pictures of the old city are from Larochelle. Not Paris. Larochelle is located North of Bordeau. As for alu panniers, they come from a Romanian company. The panniers are extremely well made and the racks were easy to install. They do not have fitting racks for every bike though. They are small. But they do have a superb offering. And ultra cheap.

I picked the 48 litre panniers

www.heavyduties.ro
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1982 Honda 500 Ascot FT / 1986 Honda 750 Nighthawk S / 1988 Honda 1000 Hurricane / 1990 Honda CBR1000F
2001 BMW K1200RS aka Good Girl -- Current
2006 BMW R1150GSA aka Kim Kardashian -- Current
1988 Honda Africa Twin aka Queen of Sheeba -- Current
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Old 01-21-2015, 02:42 PM   #15
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Very nice rr. Not too much text and enough pics ;)
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