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Old 05-04-2013, 08:57 AM   #17416
japako
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@WestVirginia, If you have not taken a MSF course, in my opinion it really will help you. Just think about it.. jmho
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Old 05-04-2013, 09:12 AM   #17417
Dirty bike
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Originally Posted by japako View Post
@WestVirginia, If you have not taken a MSF course, in my opinion it really will help you. Just think about it.. jmho
That's an excellent suggestion. They have courses geared for returning riders now, not just beginners. Also for advanced riders that cover technique and practices in much greater detail.

Well worth the minimal cost. Great for pointing out the bad habits even experienced riders can develop over years of riding and getting us back on track to ride better, , smoother, smarter and more aware.
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Old 05-04-2013, 12:13 PM   #17418
avc8130
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If you want to take a COURSE, take a Total Control course. MSF on steroids. You will REALLY learn how to control your motorcycle.

http://www.totalcontroltraining.net/

If you are at all "local" to NY, take it with Christine:

http://www.ckskickstart.com/

They will teach you how to hustle a big beast around with aplomb and safety.

ac
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Old 05-04-2013, 12:45 PM   #17419
Anticyclone
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As to the rear brake pad wear issue; With the UBS, the rear brakes are immediately applied when the front brakes are applied, so wouldn't adding rear brake to that add more rear brake than needed for a particular situation?

In other words, the UBS adds x amount of brake, you add what you think is y amount via the brake pedal, but what you're actually getting is x+y amount of rear brake force. Therefore, unless you habitually add rear brake first (thus deactivating the UBS), your rear pad wear will be accelerated vs. what you're used to on a bike with "normal" brakes.

Does this make any sense at all? I'm very tired and confusing myself.
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Old 05-04-2013, 01:22 PM   #17420
F16Viper68
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I've had my S10 for about five months now and was wondering if anyone else is noticing the heat coming out the left side while underway? I'm feeling it come out the gap between the tank and fairing plus out the left when the radiator fan kicks on.

I know some folks are noticing it as well but others say they don't feel anything. So much heat comes out I'm really struggling to understand how some folks are stating they don't feel a thing.

I know many folks have had bikes that radiated a lot of heat but coming off a V-Strom, which radiated nothing I could feel, I'm not used to this much discomfort.

I've mocked up a deflector shield and blocked the air coming out the gap so it's a bit better. Is heat an issue for all the 1200cc ADV bikes?

Shut up and ride?

Dave...
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Old 05-04-2013, 01:33 PM   #17421
Dirty bike
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anticyclone View Post
As to the rear brake pad wear issue; With the UBS, the rear brakes are immediately applied when the front brakes are applied, so wouldn't adding rear brake to that add more rear brake than needed for a particular situation?

In other words, the UBS adds x amount of brake, you add what you think is y amount via the brake pedal, but what you're actually getting is x+y amount of rear brake force. Therefore, unless you habitually add rear brake first (thus deactivating the UBS), your rear pad wear will be accelerated vs. what you're used to on a bike with "normal" brakes.

Does this make any sense at all? I'm very tired and confusing myself.
IF I understand it, the UBS does apply rear brake, but once your foot pressure on the brake pedal exceeds the already applied pressure, you're adding input.

If you apply the brake pedal first, the proportioning valve will eliminate UBS input unless it feels you're not applying enough brake, then it will add pressure.

Depending on how hard you're braking, the difference in pad wear may be moot.
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Old 05-04-2013, 01:39 PM   #17422
Dirty bike
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Quote:
Originally Posted by F16Viper68 View Post
I've had my S10 for about five months now and was wondering if anyone else is noticing the heat coming out the left side while underway? I'm feeling it come out the gap between the tank and fairing plus out the left when the radiator fan kicks on.

I know some folks are noticing it as well but others say they don't feel anything. So much heat comes out I'm really struggling to understand how some folks are stating they don't feel a thing.

I know many folks have had bikes that radiated a lot of heat but coming off a V-Strom, which radiated nothing I could feel, I'm not used to this much discomfort.

I've mocked up a deflector shield and blocked the air coming out the gap so it's a bit better. Is heat an issue for all the 1200cc ADV bikes?

Shut up and ride?

Dave...
Dave, (man, that's a lot shorter than F16Viper68), before anyone tells you to stop being a whiney bi-atch, why don't you tell us what you're wearing while riding the bike. You are in FL, after all.

There was a guy on the FJR forum years ago, also in FL, that bitched more than anyone about the heat. In the end, it turned out he was riding in shorts, in city traffic, at about 35 mph. We told him to buy a scooter.

If you're wearing jeans or less, you're probably a lot more sensitive to the heat off the bike than people riding in actual riding pants. The only time I can recall thinking about heat off the bike, it was over 100F and I was stuck in a traffic jam. Pretty much any bike will be hot under those conditions.

Or, I could ask if you feel the heat is about the same when you're riding in the mountains...
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Old 05-04-2013, 01:57 PM   #17423
F16Viper68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dirty bike View Post
Dave, (man, that's a lot shorter than F16Viper68), before anyone tells you to stop being a whiney bi-atch, why don't you tell us what you're wearing while riding the bike. You are in FL, after all.

There was a guy on the FJR forum years ago, also in FL, that bitched more than anyone about the heat. In the end, it turned out he was riding in shorts, in city traffic, at about 35 mph. We told him to buy a scooter.

If you're wearing jeans or less, you're probably a lot more sensitive to the heat off the bike than people riding in actual riding pants. The only time I can recall thinking about heat off the bike, it was over 100F and I was stuck in a traffic jam. Pretty much any bike will be hot under those conditions.

Or, I could ask if you feel the heat is about the same when you're riding in the mountains...
Thanks for not jumping all over me, although I'm sure someone's bound to light me up soon enough.

When it gets warmer I typically wear TCX boots, jeans, Olympia mesh overpants, and a Olympia mesh jacket. Sometimes when it's really hot (hasn't been yet) I wear shorts under the mesh overpants.

I have an air cooled 1981 Honda CB650C so I know bikes can throw off a lot of heat. I'm just curious if there's something wrong with my bike.

Dave...
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Old 05-04-2013, 02:12 PM   #17424
Anticyclone
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The only time I notice the heat is when it's cold and I put my left hand down over the radiator vent to warm it up. I wish there was a radiator on both sides on those days .

I wear shorts under mesh on occasion and have never specifically noticed engine heat under those circumstances.
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Old 05-04-2013, 02:24 PM   #17425
Dirty bike
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Quote:
Originally Posted by F16Viper68 View Post
When it gets warmer I typically wear TCX boots, jeans, Olympia mesh overpants, and a Olympia mesh jacket. Sometimes when it's really hot (hasn't been yet) I wear shorts under the mesh overpants.

I have an air cooled 1981 Honda CB650C so I know bikes can throw off a lot of heat. I'm just curious if there's something wrong with my bike.

Dave...
From what you describe, the bike sounds like it's doing all the right things. If the fan is coming on while you're riding at highway speeds in moderate weather, I would wonder. First thing to check would be the coolant levels in the radiator and overflow bottle. I found out the hard way once that the overflow bottle can be fine, and the radiator low. Don't check it when the bike is hot.

I suspect you wouldn't notice it quite so much w/o the mesh pants. (in cordura riding pants w/o mesh), but couldn't say you'd been any more comfortable. Sounds like the combo of the mesh and your sensitivity is all that is going on here.

Heat can be an issue for any bike that makes a lot of power. You've got 125 Hp there, it's going to need cooling and if it's not getting it from airflow at speed, that fan is going to come on and blow it thru the radiator and that will come back at the rider.

I typically only wear LDComfort stuff under my riding pants. I'm not a mesh fan, but I don't live in FL either. We have a lot drier heat in the desert. The mesh just evaporates more fluid here, then you're even worse off than before. Dehydrated and hot.
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Old 05-04-2013, 04:19 PM   #17426
avc8130
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dirty bike View Post
IF I understand it, the UBS does apply rear brake, but once your foot pressure on the brake pedal exceeds the already applied pressure, you're adding input.

If you apply the brake pedal first, the proportioning valve will eliminate UBS input unless it feels you're not applying enough brake, then it will add pressure.

Depending on how hard you're braking, the difference in pad wear may be moot.
On pavement I don't think I have ever touched the rear brake on a motorcycle at more than 10 mph. The Tenere being no different.

Once I plant the front by SQUEEZING the lever, I can pull the brake lever with 2 fingers to the point I crush my other 2 fingers stopping in a "panic" situation (I do this just about every day as I approach my driveway to hone my skills).

I, personally, have never found the rear brake to add much beneficial braking. If I am braking hard, the rear wheel is very light and will be easy to lock up. In fact, when coming to a full stop using only the front lever, I can get the rear wheel to skip on the pavement right as the bike comes to a stop. That USB catches me every time.

Fortunately, I find it very easy to trail brake deep with the UBS on the Tenere.

Off road, different situation. The rear brake comes out a bit, but I have never felt so comfortable using the front brake off road/on gravel as I do with the UBS.

ac
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Old 05-04-2013, 04:32 PM   #17427
Anticyclone
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dirty bike View Post
IF I understand it, the UBS does apply rear brake, but once your foot pressure on the brake pedal exceeds the already applied pressure, you're adding input.

If you apply the brake pedal first, the proportioning valve will eliminate UBS input unless it feels you're not applying enough brake, then it will add pressure.

Depending on how hard you're braking, the difference in pad wear may be moot.
That makes sense.
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Old 05-04-2013, 04:37 PM   #17428
Anticyclone
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Originally Posted by avc8130 View Post
On pavement I don't think I have ever touched the rear brake on a motorcycle at more than 10 mph. The Tenere being no different.
That's mostly how I do it. Rear brake is for parking lots, rolling up to stop signs, and gravel.

Quote:
Off road, different situation. The rear brake comes out a bit, but I have never felt so comfortable using the front brake off road/on gravel as I do with the UBS.

ac
Yep. Initially I wanted an ABS off switch. Now I don't see the need for it, but I'm no JuameV.
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Old 05-04-2013, 05:58 PM   #17429
BobLoblaw
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Quote:
Originally Posted by avc8130 View Post
On pavement I don't think I have ever touched the rear brake on a motorcycle at more than 10 mph. The Tenere being no different.

Once I plant the front by SQUEEZING the lever, I can pull the brake lever with 2 fingers to the point I crush my other 2 fingers stopping in a "panic" situation (I do this just about every day as I approach my driveway to hone my skills).

I, personally, have never found the rear brake to add much beneficial braking. If I am braking hard, the rear wheel is very light and will be easy to lock up. In fact, when coming to a full stop using only the front lever, I can get the rear wheel to skip on the pavement right as the bike comes to a stop. That USB catches me every time.

Fortunately, I find it very easy to trail brake deep with the UBS on the Tenere.

Off road, different situation. The rear brake comes out a bit, but I have never felt so comfortable using the front brake off road/on gravel as I do with the UBS.

ac
please clarify, are you talking linked braking systems only or all motorcycles including non linked systems?
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Old 05-04-2013, 06:50 PM   #17430
okiegtrider
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Originally Posted by Dallara View Post
There are reports that the AltRider plate drags its rearmost corners immediately after the pegs, and as such could lever the wheel up and off the pavement in much the same fashion...

Of course, each situation, and corner, is different. Is the corner banked? Is it off-camber? Is there a bump in the corner? Etc., etc., etc. On some either plate st-up might drag, on others not at all. Bike set-up is a factor, too. Is the suspension stock? Is it properly set-up? Is the bike over-loaded? Solo or two-up? Forks slid up in the clamps? Lowering links?

All these things, and more, enter into the equation...

And how you plan to use the bike is a factor. If you plan to ride a lot off-road then you may want to make the compromise a more protective plate might cause - i.e. more off-road protection might mean less lean angle on pavement. Only you know the how's and why's of the uses you will put your bike through, and you are the only one who can choose your own compromises.

It certainly is a good idea to check cornering clearance, etc. with any accessory you bolt on that might present such a compromise.

Just my two centavos...

Dallara



~
THIS is why Dallara has become my ADVrider hero. Uncommon, common sense posts.

Had the pleasure of meeting Dallara at CoTA a couple weeks ago. A great guy and a real gentleman. . He did me a good turn down there. Just want to say thanks sir!
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