ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > Beasts
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 09-27-2013, 09:12 AM   #19951
Jim Rowley
Rise above
 
Jim Rowley's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2001
Location: Black Forest, Colorado
Oddometer: 2,510
Quote:
Originally Posted by pluric View Post
Ya think?
Definitely. But keep 'em coming.
__________________
Jim Rowley
Black Forest, CO
Jim Rowley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2013, 09:15 AM   #19952
William42
Beastly Adventurer
 
William42's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2008
Location: Champaign, IL
Oddometer: 2,470
Quote:
Originally Posted by pluric View Post
Ya think?
No, do you?
__________________
Mud is evil
William42 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2013, 09:59 AM   #19953
pluric
Gimpy Adventurer
 
pluric's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2006
Location: Salt Lake
Oddometer: 16,076
Quote:
Originally Posted by William42 View Post
No, do you?
Seldom while typing.
pluric is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2013, 10:06 AM   #19954
TH
There and Here
 
TH's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2007
Location: Northern VA
Oddometer: 912
I just wonder how many bent rims it takes before one starts acquiring "Pluric" traits....
__________________
"doggone and dagnabit! That's what I call a whopping' big rabbit."
Keep the rubber side down
'01 Sprint ST '12 Super Tenere
NOVA Tag-o-Rama Map
TH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2013, 10:13 AM   #19955
racer1735
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Dec 2005
Location: Amarillo/Canyon, TX
Oddometer: 342
Super Ten first impressions

I made took possession of a 2012 Super Tenere yesterday, having ridden my ST1300 from Canyon to Austin. I stayed about 120 miles from Austin, then rode into the Capitol city yesterday, swapped everything over from the 1300 to the Super Ten and was on the road for the return trip by 1:15. 492 miles and 8 hours later, I rolled into my driveway (and a total of 614 miles for the day between the two bikes).

INITIAL IMPRESSIONS:

SIZE: The Super Ten is noticably lighter than the ST, both at stop as well as at speed. It is tall (see below), but moves easily once under way. And I didn't have any difficulty paddling my way out of parking spaces Maybe some of this is due to the larger diameter wheels? Regardless, it felt much lighter than its 500+ lbs, while the ST always felt every bit of its 750+ lbs. Also, you sit atop the Super Ten and while the impression is one of height, you don't feel like you are astride a tremendously large machine, other than the fact that your arms are splayed out wide in dirt-bike style.

HEIGHT: The Super Tenere is a TALL bike. I'm 6-1 with a 34" inseam and if you are the type that is hung up on flat-footing both feet while at a stop, forget it. It is a dirt-bike on steroids-type feel. Granted, I put the seat in the higher of two positions and used my Airhawk seat for the ride home, which adds maybe an inch, but it is still a tall bike. I experimented for about 30 miles with the seat in the lower position, but my knees prefer the taller of the two positions. I can see where this would be an easy bike to drop at low speed in a parking lot.

ERGONOMICS: Aside from the physical height, the Super Ten felt natural to me. The bars are very wide and give great leverage when turning. Controls fall readily to my hands. Both levers are adjustable. Very comfortable bike to ride. Rather than the 'tucked-in' feel I had on the ST, the Super Ten is more of a dirtbike style. You are hanging out there in the breeze, to a point. But if feels natural and is very comfortable. I did NOT make any of the ride without the Airhawk, so can't comment on the long-term use of the seat at this time.

ENGINE: This thing flat stomps! I'd read negative comments regarding the engines lack of 'oomph' in Touring mode, as well as a lack of 'sound'. Those folks obviously hadn't come from an ST1300 background. The engine has a wonderful, deep growl upon startup, and when starting from a standing stop it reminded me of a cross between a Big Twin (which it essentially is, just not a 'V') and a big 4-stroke dirt bike. in fact, it reminded me very much of the sound my old Ducati 900 made after I put a Micron canister on it. Not a V-Twin cadence, but a nice throaty roar. You can literally move away by releasing the clutch without using throttle if you know what you are doing. I did not use the Sport mode on the trip home, as I was interested in fuel economy (one of the few times you'll hear me say that). With a strong crosswind over half the trip, and a tail wind the final 120 miles, I averaged 44.5 mpg for the ride home. I'd also read about 'surging' issues at various RPM, but couldn't find any fault with my machine. 77-80 mph fell right about 4200 RPM (as registered on GPS....the speedo is just as optimistic as what the ST's was). 77 mph was an indicated 85 mph. And being a twin with a fairly flat-plane crank, you can feel it 'shake', both at idle as well as upon acceleration. But it isn't a tooth-rattling, what-fastener-is-going-to-depart-now shake, just the feel that you have a powerful engine. And not a hint of the type of buzz that the ST1300 had. Over the 480 mile trip home, I didn't once have to let loose of the grip and flex my hand for circulation.

INSTRUMENTS: Easily legible....analog tach and digital speedo. multi-function display has two buttons, one of which toggle thru odometer and 2 trip odometers. Only issue I had on occasion was when trying to re-set the trip odometer following fuel stops, I would hold the button a tad too long and change the readout to Metric. Second button toggles ambient temperature, water temperature (but you won't know if unless you are familiar with the gauge, as there isn't an 'F' or anything referencing temp), fuel economy (trip and total mpg). There is a third, less prominent button located on the side of the instrument cluster which toggles the ABS settings. During the day, the cluster is a black digit on a neutral screen while at night, the cluster is dark grey/black digits with an orange backlight.

HEADLIGHTS AND TURN SIGNALS: I rode about 150 miles after dark and the headlight is one of the best I've had in some time. It casts a bright, broad beam across the road, with a definite cut-off point at the top. The high beam does away with the cut-off point, but both beams illuminate the darkness. I don't see any pressing need for auxilliary lighting at this time. Its nice to have turn signals that you can see operate (why? Not sure, but its nice). Also, the on-dash indicator are two large, green, indicator lighs on the left and right hand side of the instrument cluster. Very noticable during daylight use.

MIRRORS: High and wide and offer a very clear view of whats behind. No buzzing or blurring.

BRAKES: Very strong initial bite. I tried to induce some fading by applying hard during the heat of the day from high speed. Absolutely none. Linked in a different manner from what the ST's were, and you can also use the rear brake on its own by not applying any front lever (such as when maneuvering in parking lots). Very convenient.

WEATHER PROTECTION-WIND FLOW: While the Super Ten is not a fully faired bike, it does have kind of a half fairing which juts out a bit. The airflow would hit my lower leg, but not from the thigh up. Also, despite reading negative comments regarding buffeting from the small, stock windscreen, I found it to be quite adequate. It was already placed in the upper of two settings (you change settings with tools) The airflow hit my helmet just above the faceshield (I wore a full face helmet). From what I've gathered, the buffeting issue is a result of high speeds with an ADV-style helmet which has a bill or peak. Doesn't take much to figure out a bill is going to catch any airflow, even on an unfaired bike. I'd thought a Wonderlich Tobinnator was going on my short list of must-have farkles, but after yesterday's state-wide romp, I think I will hold off for a bit. Also, the stock hand guards to a great job of keeping the wind off your hands. I noticed that after the sun went down I wasn't getting chilly fingers, either. Heated grips a no longer one of the first farkles I am concidering.

HANDLING: My only knowledge to report thus far is on pavement - Slow speed handling was good. You are aware of your height off the pavement, but having the ability to drag the rear brake without having the front end tuck is a great relief. At speed, the bike goes where you want it to. The suspension works great. I wasn't aware of any oversprung-underdamped issues, nor was I able to properly set the bike up for 'me' before starting my journey home. I had the rear preload 2 cranks above 'normal' but have now idea how the front preload and damping was set. I'll work on this over the weekend. Other than when going thru the 30 mph zones of the smaller Texas towns most of this ride was conducted between 70 and 80 mph, with numerous curves thru the Hill Country and Big Country. Simply put, you lever the bar in the direction you want to go (countersteer) and the Super Ten tracks true. No bobbling, wavering, wanting to stand up mid-corner. Just go. And if you have to brake a bit before or during the turn, you get a wonderfully throaty roar when you get back on the gas! My bike was wearing a fresh set of Avon Distanzia's, and I'm sure they had a lot to do with the handling on pavement. Were it to have TKC-80's, I'm sure I'd be reporting a bit more squirming in corners.

OTHER STUFF: REFUELING. What's with the 'basket' thats stuck in the filler neck of the tank? Its tough to get a fuel nozzle down into the tank and when you do, the gas burbles up and cuts off the auto flow. And if you try to hold the nozzle up a bit, like I did on the ST1300, and peer in to see what kind of progress you are making, it sloshes fuel all over the place. I'm sure there is a good reason for this thing, but its a PITA.

LUGGAGE. While many choose options other than stock, the Yamaha side cases are big and deep. Won't hold a helmet, but will hold tons of stuff (more than what the ST1300 will hold). They open with a separate key from the ignition (Cycle World did a report stating the latch would get sticky and they feared breaking the ignition key. This isn't the case as its a separate key). Lids hinge in front and pivot upward. Very easy to load. I plan to get some inner bags to make it even easier. I have NOT attempted to remove the bags from the bike, yet. There is a red plastic latch which pops out to remove the bags, but I haven't attempted yet. In keeping with the overall height of the bike, mounting and dismounting with the luggage in place requires very long legs. I had the heel of my boot contact the RH bag on just about every attempt to get off the bike. As opposed to the ST's side cases, these bags are noticably large. I will be taking them off when not actually using them.

ACCESSORY PLUG. The bike comes equiped as stock with a 12v outlet located just to the right of the ignition switch. Rather than a Powerlet style plug, it is the standard auto-style cigarette lighter style. So all my Powerlet stuff which I used on my ST will now need converted to the standard style. Fortunately, my GPS has both style plugs. This outlet is a 'switched' outlet, meaning that I cannot plug my battery tender into it to keep the battery charged, so will need to add this to my list of farkles.

Overall first impressions...what a bike! No remorse on this purchase, at least not yet. I do plan to install crash bars soon, and a bash plate at some point (the oil filter is fully exposed, but I don't plan to do any riding much more offroad than a dirt road at in the foreseeable future. I'm sure others may differ with some of my comments, or they may agree. To each his own. I just plan to ride and enjoy!

racer1735 screwed with this post 09-27-2013 at 10:27 AM
racer1735 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2013, 10:31 AM   #19956
markjenn
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Nov 2003
Location: Swellvue, WA
Oddometer: 10,322
Good review, although I've never heard the comment that the engine "flat stomps", especially in T mode. I guess it depends on your POV.

I think we've more/less conclusively concluded that S vs. T mode has no effect on fuel mileage, just throttle response/damping. So put her in S and enjoy better responsiveness. I find the T mode so lethargic it makes bike seem very dull, alhtough I do find it occasionally useful off-road and in the rain.

Enjoy your new bike.

- Mark
markjenn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2013, 10:34 AM   #19957
RocketJohn
Hook em' Horns!
 
RocketJohn's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2002
Location: Denver Metro
Oddometer: 11,316
Nice review.

I picked up my 2013 Yamaha Super Tenere exactly 6 months ago and only have 2,500 miles on it. I've never been more than 150 miles from my house. With my busy work schedule I haven't been able to schedule longer rides, but I have had many many canyon rides. And a few light pussy DS rides. I've only commuted a handful of times on it. My commute wears me down and I find that if I commute too much I won't ride on the weekend or after work.

I flat out have zero regrets with this bike. It just performs so well. I love the neutral ergos, the power, the technology, the reliability.

Changed oil at 500 and 2,000.

New Full Bore tires at 2,000. More vibration on pavement, but impressive on dirt. Will try Metzelers Karoo3 next time, because why not?

Over the winter I'd like to add some of those big bright square LED lights.

Things I wish it had on it, but not a huge deal that it doesn't:
1) Gear Indicator
2) Cruise Control
3) More comfortable seat
4) More complete toolkit
5) Fewer use of so many different sized bolts
6) Thicker Paint

RocketJohn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2013, 10:35 AM   #19958
TH
There and Here
 
TH's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2007
Location: Northern VA
Oddometer: 912
I ditto the review. You did a nice job with it. You also brought back some seriousness back to the thread.

I use the S mode all the time. I like the extra pinch if I need it. Which I often do need during my commute in the DC traffic.
__________________
"doggone and dagnabit! That's what I call a whopping' big rabbit."
Keep the rubber side down
'01 Sprint ST '12 Super Tenere
NOVA Tag-o-Rama Map
TH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2013, 10:54 AM   #19959
pluric
Gimpy Adventurer
 
pluric's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2006
Location: Salt Lake
Oddometer: 16,076
You lost me on the lights and flat stomps.

Coming of an ST I would have thought you would have been less than impressed.

Very nice write up and wait until you see (pun intended) with the aftermarket lights.

As far as the 'Flat stomps', here it comes....... get a REFLASH!!! I'm kind of the
poster child for that upgrade. Then I want to read your new and improved impression report.
pluric is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2013, 12:18 PM   #19960
ExpatADV
Adventurer
 
ExpatADV's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2013
Location: People's Republic of British Columbia
Oddometer: 32
Eh?

Quote:
Originally Posted by pluric View Post
You lost me on the lights and flat stomps.

Coming of an ST I would have thought you would have been less than impressed.

Very nice write up and wait until you see (pun intended) with the aftermarket lights.

As far as the 'Flat stomps', here it comes....... get a REFLASH!!! I'm kind of the
poster child for that upgrade. Then I want to read your new and improved impression report.
Can you point me in the right direction for that re-flash? I've heard about it but not sure where to go. I've also seen/heard about the clutch switch mod? Is that the same thing?
__________________
__________________________
"The only difference between bravery and stupidity is success"
2012 Super Tenere
ExpatADV is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2013, 12:21 PM   #19961
Jim Rowley
Rise above
 
Jim Rowley's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2001
Location: Black Forest, Colorado
Oddometer: 2,510
Quote:
Originally Posted by pluric View Post
I'm kind of the
poster child for...
Let the captions begin.
__________________
Jim Rowley
Black Forest, CO
Jim Rowley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2013, 12:27 PM   #19962
AndrewT
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Oct 2009
Location: Tivoli, TX
Oddometer: 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by racer1735 View Post
Only issue I had on occasion was when trying to re-set the trip odometer following fuel stops, I would hold the button a tad too long and change the readout to Metric.
If you hold the button down while the trip odometer is not blinking, it changes to metric. You have to toggle from trip 1 to trip 2 to ODO and back to trip 1 (blinking now) to reset trip 1. Enjoy! The "F" count-up reserve odometer resets automatically when you fill the tank above reserve level.
__________________
Andrew Tatton
'12 Super Tenere
'09 KLR 688
'04 KTM 625 SXC
AndrewT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2013, 12:41 PM   #19963
racer1735
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Dec 2005
Location: Amarillo/Canyon, TX
Oddometer: 342
Compared to an ST1300, the engine has more grunt down low when you really give the gas. The ST actually prefered to be spinning before it took off. And the ST's headlight was notoriously narrow of field. Thats one reason my bike had a pair of fog as well as driving lights.

Hey, who's complaining. The Super Ten is fun to ride!
racer1735 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2013, 12:45 PM   #19964
pluric
Gimpy Adventurer
 
pluric's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2006
Location: Salt Lake
Oddometer: 16,076
Quote:
Originally Posted by ExpatADV View Post
Can you point me in the right direction for that re-flash? I've heard about it but not sure where to go. I've also seen/heard about the clutch switch mod? Is that the same thing?
For the reflash I highly recommend these guys.

http://www.af1racing.com/store/Scripts/contactUs.asp

The clutch mod to me is a Band-Aid approach to get rid of the low speed hiccup and
lower three gear restriction. It does make a noticeable difference and for next to nothing
in cost is worth trying out. Your bike will start in gear so keep that in mind.

The reflash is an upgrade in the programming of the ECU. Makes a STRONG difference in performance
in the S mode. T mode is almost tamer and a very distinct difference between the two. For me the S
mode is sometimes too responsive for minor throttle input. Running hard no big deal, just slight twists
result in a harder to smoothly control response. Switch to T mode and all is smooth, just a little boring.

Quick google search will give you all sorts insight.
pluric is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2013, 03:16 PM   #19965
fredz43
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: May 2006
Location: Illinois- land of straight, flat, boring roads.
Oddometer: 587
Nice review overall. A couple minor things. The little button on the side of the instruments does not toggle the ABS. It toggles the TCS. Also, the ignition key is supposed to open the luggage. The bikes come with 3 extra locks that are keyed the same as the ignition and they are for the Yamaha luggage. If this is a pre owned S10, perhaps the previous owner had another key made as they were concerned with bending the ignition key?

I came from 3 previous ST1300's and although I loved them, I love the S10 a lot more. The only thing I miss is that electric windscreen.

Don't miss the heat on my legs, though.
fredz43 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 02:09 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014