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Old 12-12-2010, 11:32 AM   #5701
R3B
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bundu View Post
I see - Then my price in SA was quite cheap, as I paid 13,860 EURO without any accessories
Well its all about taxes, witout VAT and BPM the S10 would only cost:

Totaal consumentenprijs €16,999,- - Full price
Bruto BPM---------------€ 2,202,- - Special Luxury tax
BTW ( 19.0% )----------€ 2,363,- - VAT
Netto catalogusprijs-----€12,434,- - Base price
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Old 12-12-2010, 01:37 PM   #5702
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OEM accessory LED indicators

For those with the Yamaha Accessory LED indicators do they come with/require small plates to fit them to the original body locations like these or similar?
http://i.ebayimg.com/07/!BhF,Kd!!Wk~...BU2O!~~_12.JPG
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Old 12-12-2010, 04:42 PM   #5703
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IainMac View Post
For those with the Yamaha Accessory LED indicators do they come with/require small plates to fit them to the original body locations like these or similar?
http://i.ebayimg.com/07/!BhF,Kd!!Wk~$(KGrHqMH-EUEsL!4fZ9ZBLHpIBU2O!~~_12.JPG
Here are some pics and how to by the Wasp. If you look around the 2 page, you can see the original lights.

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showt...595933&page=13
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Old 12-12-2010, 07:12 PM   #5704
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Lets bring this over here from Wasp's thread.

Is the S10 in a different class then the V-Strom ?

If so, why ?

OK ladies, discuss.
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Old 12-12-2010, 07:27 PM   #5705
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DockingPilot View Post
Lets bring this over here from Wasp's thread.

Is the S10 in a different class then the V-Strom ?

If so, why ?

OK ladies, discuss.
Australian perspective.

The S10 is the V-Strom Suzuki Should have got to by now if they had done a bit more than change colours and taken the segment seriously.

However the Strom in Australia is a cheap reliable retro tech bike that most people find great value for money.

The S10 is a good value, reliable, leading edge tech bike that most people (should) find good value for money.

Having said that the Suzuki is more Street biased than the S10 in its origibnal inception but the S10 I bet will more than match it on the street and eat it in the dirt if you had to race, but this is not what Adventure riders should feel the need to do unless getting an ambulance for a fallen rider.

Hows that

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Old 12-12-2010, 07:29 PM   #5706
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Thats good !
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Old 12-12-2010, 08:10 PM   #5707
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GrahamD View Post
Australian perspective.

The S10 is the V-Strom Suzuki Should have got to by now if they had done a bit more than change colours and taken the segment seriously.

However the Strom in Australia is a cheap reliable retro tech bike that most people find great value for money.

The S10 is a good value, reliable, leading edge tech bike that most people (should) find good value for money.
The big VStrom is a terrific bike with a good price and very little respect from the professional bike reviewers. They really didn't like it, but the owners love it. It is a true value leader.

The S10 packs a lot of technology into a very reasonably priced bike that the European bike reviewers don't seem to respect, but so far the owners appear very impressed. I find that encouraging since I know how great the Vee turned out to be. Compared to other adventure bikes with similar technology the S10 is a value leader.

For me the S10 is the obvious upgrade bike from the Strom. I love my Vee but wanted ABS, shaft drive, more engine, and better dirt handling. I'm expecting the S10 to be everything I love about the Vee and more.
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Old 12-13-2010, 04:16 AM   #5708
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vilageidgit View Post
got a pamphlet from the Toronto show,it says:
Yamaha Early Deposit Program
$500 deposit by April 30,eligible for additional 2 yr extended warranty,
1 free Yamalube & filter,Customer Priority Delivery and $250 accessory rebate
Yamaha has accessories that cost $250 or less?
some dealers are already discounting bout $1000

What dealers in Ontario are discounting ?
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Old 12-13-2010, 08:01 AM   #5709
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I flew out of Helena, MT Saturday morning and spent the day at the Seattle show, then flew home late that night. Of the 8 hours I was on the show floor, I probably spent a total of 3 hours, off and on, within 20 feet of the two Super Ténéré in the Yamaha booth and another hour, off and on, talking with Jeremy, Christina and the other AltRider folks at their booth.

There was a lot of excitement about these bikes. Many that saw them didn't even know what they were. Many had already ordered, plan to, or wanted to but can't swing it. But the vast majority seemed to know what they were, were curious, but had no intent of buying such a bike. One of the reps (Wayne, I think) was first-hand knowledgeable and had put a few hundred miles on the one bike. It looked like it had been used a bit as the bike with the panniers had a good scuff mark around the right side case. I spent the day crawling on the Super Tens, then going and crawling over other bikes, then coming back and sitting on the ST again. By going and sitting on other bikes to 'cleanse my palate', it really gave me a good idea of how I fit on the bike compared to other bikes and I fit it well. Sitting on the bike in person was the final detail and I plan on ordering this week. The rep suspected that orders placed now wouldn't show up in the middle of summer.

The bikes at the Yamaha booth were UK spec bikes, but with black seat and side panels like what the US bikes will have. These bikes were not US spec bikes like I heard some people saying. The U.S. version hasn't even started being produced yet, so it is just not possible that these were U.S. spec bikes. That and the Yamaha rep confirmed they were UK spec bikes. The bike that Jeremy had at the AltRider booth was borrowed from someone in Australia so had the silver side panels and seat color. It is going to the California show and then heading back to Australia because customs would only allow it to remain in the U.S. for a fixed amount of time (and maybe the owner is missing his bike, too). Jeremy showed me the footage they had shot Friday morning before bringing the bike into the show. If you saw how much mud covered the bike, you'll understand why when you see the mudholes he was slamming through.

AltRider's Super Ten on stage during Jeremy's talk:



A few people asked me to hold their bag while they sat on the bike. I had on a Yamaha blue shirt with a WR250R on the front so I seemed to get mistaken for a Yami rep more than once. Or maybe it was because I wouldn't stop rattling off specs every time someone asked a question. Ha. So, on to my personal impressions, which largely jive with others findings...

Ergonomics: It just plain fit me. I am 6' tall and usually wear pants with 32" inseam and a 34" sleeve dress shirt. A lot of my height is in my torso. I had on hiking boots that have soles about the same height as my riding boots. On the bike with the seat in the tall position (which was the bike without panniers), I could plant both feet firmly with only about an inch under each heal. A slight shift either way had one foot flatfooting and the ball of my other foot firmly planed with that one heal a bit over 1" off the ground. With the seat in the shorter position (the bike with the panniers), I could flat foot both feet if my feet were slightly in front of the pegs and my legs were in narrow against the bike. If my legs were beside the pegs and spread more (where I would normally put down my feet), my heals were hovering just barely off the ground. Handlebar position seems pretty good for me, but I will probably raise them and determine what bar bend changes, if any, I want after logging some miles. I tend to prefer bars with the least amount of pullback I can get. I put the bike up on the center stand (easily) and tried the standing position. A bit hard to tell since the rear wheel is lifted up and the front is is lower than usual while on the center stand, but standing ergonomics were good for me, minus the usual bars being a touch low. While standing, I didn't notice anything awkward that my legs or knees touched.

Fit and finish:
This seemed fairly decent to me. But I'm more of a function over form kind of guy. It's no show bike, but isn't meant to be. To me, it was a feast for the eyes. Maybe I already drank the kool-aid and turned a blind eye to some things others thought were a lesser finish. That being said, mine will be used on trails and not just gravel roads and tarmac and I'll end up with places that will never again be showroom clean after the first few rides...so, I plan to take lots of "beauty pageant" pictures when it's new because it will never look the same again. Speaking of pictures. I took a bunch at the Yamaha and AltRider boothes, so will post a few of those now and maybe a few more later. They are not the best quality since I only brought my point-and-shoot. I didn't want to lug around my SLR all day and while flying.

Design:
Overall, I am really impressed by the design of this bike. Really thought out. I like the double-sided swingarm, which, as mentioned above, allows for a much more petite looking shaft drive since it doesn't need to account for the stresses of a single-sided swing arm à la 1200GS. Regarding weight, whatever Yami did to make this very heavy bike feel lighter, they were successful. As others, I was amazed when I sat on it and quickly flopped it back and forth. Also amazed at how easily it popped up onto the center stand and how far you could lean over the bike, while standing next to it holding only the handlebars, before the bike's weight became apparent. I did that maneuver very early in the day (I was the fifth one through the door) before there were crowds around and before the reps were hovering around. I'm sure they saw me, from behind their counter, lean it waaaay over and their hearts skipped a beat. I did that to the non-pannier bike and I suspect that I leaned it over far enough that, had it been the panniered-bike, the pannier would have nearly touched the ground. I'll be good picking it up by myself if it's in a reasonable position and not in a wheels-higher-up-the-hill-than-the-bars position.

There looked to be reasonable rider coverage including leg coverage. When others were sitting on the bike, I made a point of looking down the length of it standing directly in front of the bike and as far back as the building's wall would let me (maybe 15 or 20 feet) and I could not see the persons knees. The shrouds stuck out far enough. Not sure how that will alter the impact of rain and runoff, but I think a few Euro, UK or Australian riders have confirmed there is some degree of leg weather protection. The windshield attachments looked a tad flimsy (possibly why Yamaha recommends against moving the stock windshield to a higher position) and, on the one bike, looked a bit used. I think these models must have had the screens moved up and down quite a few times. I plan on going with a CalSci screen on will figure out the best position and leave it. If money was no object, Wasp's fully adjustable windscreen bracket looks interesting and will save wear and tear on unscrewing the windshield bolts and moving it around if you are the type that wants to change the wind blast depending on outdoor temps, length or ride, and precipitation. An area of special interest to me were the mounting holes for auxiliary lights. As Wasp had done, I intend to mount two of the 10watt LED lights. Not sure if I'll go with two flood lights or with one flood and one spot. I just may have to see the floodlight's light spread/pattern first to decide, but it's advertised as only 35 degrees and I want a good spread to shine not only ahead, but into the ditches.

Brakes:
No way to test those here, but a few comments anyway...As some have pointed out, the ABS can be disables by pulling the ABS specific fuse. Also, the less cumbersome way to temporarily disable the ABS, without pulling off the side panel and pulling the fuse, is putting it on the center stand, putting the bike in gear and letting the rear wheel spin. Then it will throw an ABS Error, your dash light will blink, and you can ride with no ABS until you next key off and restart of the bike. ABS seems to have become such a hot topic (especially by the journalists that haven't ridden them in steep offroad situations). I'm still waiting for someone to make some videos since those that have ridden them in the loose steeps say the freewheeling issue, that plagues the BMW ABS, doesn't occur with the Super Ténéré. I would love to see some video examples of it working or not working as advertised. As with ABS on the street, it seems only the extremely skilled, hardcore riders have a desire to turn it off. I guess I may end up doing my own tests to prove to myself if the lack of an ABS disconnect is a big deal.

Extras:
I wasn't too impressed by the Yamaha accessories. Some were OK, but not up to the aftermarket offerings that are trickling in. Some were horrid. The heated grips controller is enough of a joke to be the final reason to not buy the Yamaha heated grips (the price being the primary reason). There is no excuse for that controller to be that big or placed in that mounting spot on such a flimsy mount. Compare that controller with a Gerbings or Warm and Safe controller and you'll see how a good controller is designed.
The power outlet is a standard 'cigarette lighter' size. Those wanting the secured plug retention of a powerlet outlet will have to swap it out or add powerlets in another location.

The skid plate looks good, but as others have found, the mounting method is light-duty. Perhaps intentional so there is some give, but in my eyes, if you use mounting points that are safe to mount to, you don't need to worry about building-in sacrificial brackets (read: crush zones) in a skid plate. The crash bars are fairly nice. Yamaha went the route of protecting the engine cases with little side protection for the shrouds, which will touch town before the cases. The upper hoop may or may not help in protection the shroud. It will if the highest object, in the direct path on the side that you fall towards, hits that small bar. 2" further back, and the object is going through your radiator if you fall left or battery/fuse panel if you fall to the right. I prefer the aftermarket crash guards that cover a larger area of the side panel. Most of the skid plates seem better thought out, too. The AltRider kit was good stuff. Well thought out mounting points and bracket strength taken to the next level. They had skidplate, crashbars, additional guards for the right and left heal areas, sidestand foot, the 'double-decker' rear rack, etc. Some pieces were still in design stage and were going to have one or two more tweaks, but it was all thought out and I'll be watching their stuff closely when I start ordering goodies next April or so.

I'm sure I'll think of a few more thoughts to add later, but that is my first whack at it. I'm going to go ahead and submit this before I lose it and will go search for typos later.

There was not enough room to get a 'how does your foot touch' picture, so this angled one will have to do. Again, I'm 6' tall, 32" inseam, 34.5" sleeve length, and this is the bike with the seat in the high position. My heals are maybe 1" off the ground. The slightest shift right or left had one foot flatfoot and the other with the heal raised only slightly more than an inch, but total pressure and support with the ball of that foot. I think I was tearing up a bit. Just...so....happy.

Chadx screwed with this post 12-17-2010 at 08:26 AM
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Old 12-13-2010, 08:22 AM   #5710
A Knight Who Says Ni
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For those interested in disabling ABS, I have heard of another, even easier method. I have not tried it myself obviously but maybe some others can report back to say if it works.

Hold the brake lever while switching the bike on and off 2 times. This will disable ABS. To enable it, simply do the same thing again.
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Old 12-13-2010, 08:24 AM   #5711
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Do the throttle cables obstruct the view of the dash in any way on the super Tenere? From pictures it certainly seems like they might. This would be an annoyance to deal with
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Old 12-13-2010, 08:36 AM   #5712
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The cables do not obstruct the view of the dash instruments on the stock bike. Adding the heated grips, and the associated tweak of throttle cable routing, can cause the cable to stick up a little further and into the lower right hand view of the instruments.

Here is a shot of the heated grip bike and I took this standing next to the bike so my point of view was higher than a seated point of view. You can see that the lower right hand corner of the instruments will be obstructed by the throttle cable if your vantage point were a few inches lower, as it would be when seated. Again, the stock bike had no such issue. I'm not sure what adjustments are recommended by Yamaha during the heated grip installation that makes this happen.

Another thought I'll add that had been mentioned before, but was brought to mind as I sat on the bike:
The power outlet is a standard 'cigarette lighter' size. Those wanting the more secure plug retention of a powerlet outlet will have to swap it out or add powerlets in another location.




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Old 12-13-2010, 08:37 AM   #5713
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A Knight Who Says Ni View Post
For those interested in disabling ABS, I have heard of another, even easier method. I have not tried it myself obviously but maybe some others can report back to say if it works.

Hold the brake lever while switching the bike on and off 2 times. This will disable ABS. To enable it, simply do the same thing again.
Nup... I just tried it and, nothing..

I did it fast and I did it slow. I even did it jumping on one leg with my tongue to the left with my right eye closed = NOTHING, although I did manage to get my knob to fall trough the leg of my undies so I must remember that as a party trick. That's about all the exercise was good for.

Greg.
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Old 12-13-2010, 08:39 AM   #5714
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A Knight Who Says Ni View Post
For those interested in disabling ABS, I have heard of another, even easier method. I have not tried it myself obviously but maybe some others can report back to say if it works.

Hold the brake lever while switching the bike on and off 2 times. This will disable ABS. To enable it, simply do the same thing again.

Ah, maybe that was the 'wink wink nudge nudge say no more' ABS disable method that the Yami rep said they had in their back pocket. I may have incorrectly assumed they were referring to the centerstand/in gear manuever. Will be interested in someone's experimentation and report on the 'brake in/key it twice' method.

Edit: Wasp beat me to the punch posting on the subject even though I was just pondering and he was outside testing it and reporting back. You are quick, my good man! I wonder if that is some software update that could be included in future bikes and/or available as an update for past bikes? Sounds possible. Heck, if nothing else, it's a reasonable rumor.

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Old 12-13-2010, 08:56 AM   #5715
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A Knight Who Says Ni View Post
For those interested in disabling ABS, I have heard of another, even easier method. I have not tried it myself obviously but maybe some others can report back to say if it works.

Hold the brake lever while switching the bike on and off 2 times. This will disable ABS. To enable it, simply do the same thing again.
Since there is an ABS fuse easily accessible, it would be simple to wire in a $5 toggle switch so you can turn it on and off from the dash. A couplle of spade lugs, an in line fuse holder and a bit of wire and you are all set.

Personally, I believe that to stock ABS will be just fine for my purposes, especially after reading feedback from owners that have tried this new technology ABS, but if I decide I need to be able to disable it, I am sure I can do it easily and cheaply.
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