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Old 11-12-2012, 05:21 AM   #14251
RED CAT
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St/gsa

The GSA is a slug compared to the S10 and the standard GS. The GS and S10 are more comparable.
S10 is 50lbs heavier than the standard GS but suspension, handling, brakes, TC, and reliability are better on the S10. Much nicer motor on the S10 too.
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Old 11-12-2012, 05:55 AM   #14252
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Originally Posted by jaumev View Post
Next march I'm going to have a 10 days trip in Morocco. I would like if the ST is better than the GSA in sand.
In my last trip with the BMW I suffered a lot, it’s horrible in sand… but what an incredible experience!!!
when riding sand like that put your front tire pressure as low as you dare. like 15. 10-12 is better. rear not so low. I live in the pine barrens and have to tell visitors repeatedly. usually by lunch time they are tired of falling and are willing to try anything, so they lower the pressure. they response is always identical... "I cant believe the difference" and "Its like it is a different bike" ... also important is keping torque on the back wheel. you dont have to be flying but if you dont keep the back wheel pushing the front will dig in. Always stop on a hard spot. starting foward motion on deep loose sand is almost impossible.
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Old 11-12-2012, 07:40 AM   #14253
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaumev View Post
Next march I'm going to have a 10 days trip in Morocco. I would like if the ST is better than the GSA in sand.
In my last trip with the BMW I suffered a lot, it’s horrible in sand… but what an incredible experience!!!
Take the 400. I'd rather go to the dentist without novacaine than ride a Beast in sand.
10 days??? Just shoot me.
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Old 11-12-2012, 08:26 AM   #14254
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sallydog View Post
when riding sand like that put your front tire pressure as low as you dare. like 15. 10-12 is better. rear not so low. I live in the pine barrens and have to tell visitors repeatedly. usually by lunch time they are tired of falling and are willing to try anything, so they lower the pressure. they response is always identical... "I cant believe the difference" and "Its like it is a different bike" ... also important is keping torque on the back wheel. you dont have to be flying but if you dont keep the back wheel pushing the front will dig in. Always stop on a hard spot. starting foward motion on deep loose sand is almost impossible.
Agree....
The problem in Morocco is that after a sand section you can find a rocky one with lots of possibilities to have a puncture… and with the GSA and its awful front suspension is even worse, I had 5 punctures in 10 days!!!.

I did another trip with my DRZ and mousse instead of tube… that was fantastic. Full gas all over the places!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by pluric View Post
Take the 400. I'd rather go to the dentist without novacaine than ride a Beast in sand.
10 days??? Just shoot me.
I know... with the 400 I had good fun in the dunes!!!
This time we are going to do more than 3000km off road and lot of them in the Atlas mountains witch are very rocky…. so less sand and 4 BMW GSA with us to make us reduce the speed

jaumev screwed with this post 11-12-2012 at 08:50 AM
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Old 11-12-2012, 09:26 AM   #14255
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Originally Posted by jaumev View Post

I know... with the 400 I had good fun in the dunes!!!
This time we are going to do more than 3000km off road and lot of them in the Atlas mountains witch are very rocky…. so less sand and 4 BMW GSA with us to make us reduce the speed
Aww, they're not that bad, maybe a little slower.

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Old 11-12-2012, 09:29 AM   #14256
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Originally Posted by jaumev View Post
I know... with the 400 I had good fun in the dunes!!! This time we are going to do more than 3000km off road and lot of them in the Atlas mountains witch are very rocky…. so less sand and 4 BMW GSA with us to make us reduce the speed
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Old 11-12-2012, 12:31 PM   #14257
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nuovo super tenere 1200 diapason recing by tosco

[IMG] Uploaded with ImageShack.us[/IMG]

parasteli, cupolino, scarico,sella,pedane passeggero,posteriore tutto modificato,piastra manubrio,e un favoloso serbatoio aggiuntivo sotto la sella (10lt) tutto questo fatto da andrea toscani (detto tosco ) presso motoshop parma italia
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Old 11-12-2012, 12:41 PM   #14258
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What is with the Germans, then the Brits, and now the Italians with the welded-on passenger peg brackets???

As photos from multiple thread have shown, the DON'T offer protection in a crash. The add leverage to bend the rear subframe! Unless you are tying panniers to them, they are just in the way! (without a passenger, of course).
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Old 11-12-2012, 01:04 PM   #14259
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Originally Posted by twinrider View Post
I'm trying to decide between the two, which do you consider a better road bike in terms of handling, power and brakes?
One thing to consider with these beasts on soft surfaces is the clutch. The BMW has a single plate dry clutch, and many BMW clutches have suffered greatly (and failed) when ridden on this type of terrain. I believe BMW have corrected this on the '13 and have opted for a wet clutch, but it is something to consider on the previous models. The S10 suffers no such limitation.

-SM
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Old 11-12-2012, 01:07 PM   #14260
jaumev
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gryphon12 View Post
What is with the Germans, then the Brits, and now the Italians with the welded-on passenger peg brackets???

As photos from multiple thread have shown, the DON'T offer protection in a crash. The add leverage to bend the rear subframe! Unless you are tying panniers to them, they are just in the way! (without a passenger, of course).
This is a 10 litres tank under the seat made from Diapason Racing, a italian Yamaha dealer. I think is a good idea.
The pegs are not welded.



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Old 11-12-2012, 01:09 PM   #14261
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gryphon12 View Post
What is with the Germans, then the Brits, and now the Italians with the welded-on passenger peg brackets???

As photos from multiple thread have shown, the DON'T offer protection in a crash. The add leverage to bend the rear subframe! Unless you are tying panniers to them, they are just in the way! (without a passenger, of course).
In short, they make it easier to keep the passenger on the back of the bike. It kinda goes well with the passenger seat.
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Old 11-12-2012, 01:15 PM   #14262
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Sorry, my eyes must be getting old. My prejudice ran away from me when I mistook that first photo. Apologies all around.

Also, after an accident in college when my girl friend was almost seriously injured on the back of my bike, I choose not to ride two-up any more. It also saves room for more luggage, closer forward and not overloading the rear rack.

I like that 10-liter fuel idea. There is another thread here on ADVRider about fuel cells for the S-10, holding as much as an additional 5 gallons. I'm staying tuned for more information all around.
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Old 11-12-2012, 04:11 PM   #14263
NicolasR
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clutch lever bolt turning on perch

While I was tightening the steering stem an top triple, I noticed that when you pull the lever clutch the bolt turns on the perch. I wonder if that that is correct to happen.
I consider that the bolt should not turn because that movement will be grinding the perch material and the lower hand-saver fixing point. The brake lever bolt does not move at all.

Have you noticed that??? I am concern that in the long term that bolt movement would harm the perch. I was trying to -unscrew it but it seems to get tighter as if it had left-handed threads.
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Old 11-12-2012, 06:02 PM   #14264
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Originally Posted by NicolasR View Post
I am concern that in the long term that bolt movement would harm the perch. I was trying to -unscrew it but it seems to get tighter as if it had left-handed threads.
The bolt should be fixed as the clutch lever pivots on it. There's a lock nut on the bottom side that may be the reason you're having trouble unscrewing the bolt. You want to first tighten the bolt, then hold the bolt as you tighten the locknut.

- Mark
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Old 11-12-2012, 06:30 PM   #14265
RockyDS
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaumev View Post
This is a 10 litres tank under the seat made from Diapason Racing, a italian Yamaha dealer. I think is a good idea.
Any idea how the fuel transfers?
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