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Old 04-17-2015, 06:41 PM   #1
Michael OP
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Aluminum Ion battery - charges in 1 minute

http://www.gizmag.com/aluminum-ion-b...tanford/36936/



Researchers at Stanford University have created a fast-charging and long-lasting rechargeable battery that is inexpensive to produce, and which they claim could replace many of the lithium-ion and alkaline batteries powering our gadgets today. The prototype aluminum-ion battery is also safer, not bursting into flames as some of its lithium-ion brethren are wont to do.

The prototype battery features an anode made of aluminum, a cathode of graphite and an ionic liquid electrolyte, all packed within a flexible, polymer-coated pouch. And unlike lithium-ion batteries, which can short circuit and explode or catch fire when punctured, the aluminum-ion battery will actually continue working for a short while before not bursting into flames.

"The electrolyte is basically a salt that's liquid at room temperature, so it's very safe," said Stanford graduate student Ming Gong, co-lead author of the study.

Improved safety is great, but what many people want is a reduction in recharge times. The aluminum-ion battery hits the target here, too, with the Stanford team claiming "unprecedented charging times" of just one minute for recharging the prototype battery.

What about durability? The aluminum-ion battery has you covered there, too. Unlike typical lithium-ion batteries that last around 1,000 charge-discharge cycles, or other aluminum-ion battery lab attempts that usually died after just 100 cycles, the Stanford researchers claim their battery stood up to 7,500 cycles without a loss of capacity. This would make it attractive for storing renewable energy on the electrical grid.

"The grid needs a battery with a long cycle life that can rapidly store and release energy," team member Hongjie Dai explains. "Our latest unpublished data suggest that an aluminum battery can be recharged tens of thousands of times. It's hard to imagine building a huge lithium-ion battery for grid storage."

The experimental battery also has the added advantage of flexibility, which gives the technology the potential to find applications in the burgeoning field of flexible electronics.

Furthermore, the researchers point out that aluminum is a cheaper metal than lithium, and the aluminum-ion technology offers an environmentally friendly alternative to disposable AA and AAA alkaline batteries used to power millions of portable devices.

Currently, one of the prototype battery's biggest shortcomings is its voltage. Although Dai points out it is more than anyone else has achieved with aluminum, the battery only generates around two volts of electricity, which is around half that of a typical lithium-ion battery. However, the researchers are confident they can improve on this.

"Improving the cathode material could eventually increase the voltage and energy density," says Dai. "Otherwise, our battery has everything else you'd dream that a battery should have: inexpensive electrodes, good safety, high-speed charging, flexibility and long cycle life. I see this as a new battery in its early days. It's quite exciting."

The team's work is detailed in a paper published in the online edition of Nature and the battery can be seen in action in the video below.
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Old 04-18-2015, 01:58 PM   #2
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So when does the Tesla contract start?
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Old 04-19-2015, 03:22 AM   #3
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Interesting
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Old 04-20-2015, 06:47 PM   #4
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Yeah, pretty cool. If this actually works it will solve one half of the big limitation on battery powered cars/bikes, namely recharge time.
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Old 04-21-2015, 07:49 PM   #5
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Yeah, pretty cool. If this actually works it will solve one half of the big limitation on battery powered cars/bikes, namely recharge time.
Not really. This technology may be a great fit for low-power portable devices but won't change much on the automotive side.

There are fundamental physical limitations to how much power you can put through a conductor in a given amount of time. Even if we assume a battery that can safely accept a very high rate of charge there's still the issue of getting that energy into the battery.

Even today, the bottleneck for automotive batteries is often supply power rate of energy transfer rather than the batteries' ability to accept charge quickly.

For a typical 24 kWh automotive battery pack to fully charge in even 30 minutes would require voltages above the dialectric breakdown of air and/or currents in the hundreds of amps range; both of which are impractical if for no other reason than the fact that very few homes in the US can supply more than 240V/200A total and current "fast" home chargers are limited to about 30A.

I don't mean to be a downer, this seems like very promising technology and I wish this team the best; I just don't expect it will have any impact on electric vehicles.

We've already crossed the technological bridge of battery rate of charge, now the weak point is elsewhere in the system.
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Old 04-22-2015, 08:20 AM   #6
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You also don't get a real good look at the size of the battery that does anything other then light a LED. I also wonder what the battery will do when hit by a large draw....what was running on that cell phone, just the display? Anyone with a wife that gripes that her battery does not last only to find she never closes any app knows that what the phone is doing can effect battery life.

Lithium batteries can store huge amounts of energy in very small packages, this is why they puff and can catch fire if damaged or charged incorrectly.

I want more info....but it all has to start somewhere. It was not that long ago that Nicad batteries offered the best, now it is lithium...this could be the next thing or a dead end.
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Old 04-23-2015, 07:36 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by gmiguy View Post
Not really. This technology may be a great fit for low-power portable devices but won't change much on the automotive side.

There are fundamental physical limitations to how much power you can put through a conductor in a given amount of time. Even if we assume a battery that can safely accept a very high rate of charge there's still the issue of getting that energy into the battery.

Even today, the bottleneck for automotive batteries is often supply power rate of energy transfer rather than the batteries' ability to accept charge quickly.

For a typical 24 kWh automotive battery pack to fully charge in even 30 minutes would require voltages above the dialectric breakdown of air and/or currents in the hundreds of amps range; both of which are impractical if for no other reason than the fact that very few homes in the US can supply more than 240V/200A total and current "fast" home chargers are limited to about 30A.

I don't mean to be a downer, this seems like very promising technology and I wish this team the best; I just don't expect it will have any impact on electric vehicles.

We've already crossed the technological bridge of battery rate of charge, now the weak point is elsewhere in the system.
You make a good and valid point. The existing electrical grid at home is like filing up a gas tank with a drinking straw. Public chargers (Tesla's super chargers) can do the job much faster.

I see the solution being a bank of batteries at gas stations or at home that can "dump" the charge into a vehicle. Power companies will also be anxious to store their cheap energy in your batteries and use it when demand is high or prices are high. They were talking about this customer supplied energy storage a few years ago and trying it in a few homes in Boulder, CO.

I'm anxiously awaiting an electric dirt bike that has a 150 mile range and reasonable weight. The power delivery and silence of electric will revolutionize the industry and might get some public land access restored.
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Old 04-23-2015, 09:03 AM   #8
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The power delivery and silence of electric will revolutionize the industry and might get some public land access restored.
Doubt it....you will still be riding on it and tearing it up....heck you might even hit a bug and kill it.
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Old 04-23-2015, 12:17 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by JDUBinCO View Post
You make a good and valid point. The existing electrical grid at home is like filing up a gas tank with a drinking straw. Public chargers (Tesla's super chargers) can do the job much faster.
Agreed, high-voltage high-current chargers installed at locations that already have the right hardware to support such a thing are inevitably going to be a big part of the EV landscape and (aside from room temperature superconductors) are the best bet for truly quick-charge EVs. Even with that, it is likely that recharge mileage per unit time will never be comparable to combustion engines.

I think that EV promoters and the media in general should mention the energy transmission side of the rate of charge problem, because non-technical people hear things like "1 minute recharge" and then develop unrealistic expectations that are contrary to fundamental physical laws.
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Old 04-23-2015, 01:52 PM   #10
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This actually seems kinda interesting to me and plus I would buy it too if it is available in the market
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Old 04-23-2015, 06:19 PM   #11
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can you imagine what will happen to the grid when 10 million commuters come home and decide to boost the car a bit before heading out on the town. It is bad enough when they just kick on the AC

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Old 04-24-2015, 07:11 PM   #12
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Doubt it....you will still be riding on it and tearing it up....heck you might even hit a bug and kill it.
I can dream, right?
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Old 04-24-2015, 08:30 PM   #13
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There is this really neat electrical component that uses aluminum to hold a charge. Called a capacitor. You can usually charge it in milliseconds. And you can dump that charge just as fast. So a battery that takes a minute to charge would simply be a really slow charging capacitor?
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Old Yesterday, 07:00 PM   #14
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Not really. This technology may be a great fit for low-power portable devices but won't change much on the automotive side.
Yet! (hopefully)
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Old Yesterday, 08:57 PM   #15
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There is this really neat electrical component that uses aluminum to hold a charge. Called a capacitor. You can usually charge it in milliseconds. And you can dump that charge just as fast. So a battery that takes a minute to charge would simply be a really slow charging capacitor?
No.

Capacitors work by storing an charge, batteries work on a redox electron exchange, aka chemical reaction.

In a re-chargeable battery, you can apply power to the battery and the reaction runs backwards, storing power.

Capacitors are great, but they don't hold enough amperes to really be a good storage for a car.
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