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Old 05-29-2013, 05:45 PM   #15796
SchizzMan
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Truly sad story, Ricky. And I hope the family gets it all straightened out without too much hardship.

As far as your "nod" to this happening in some parts of our own country I must agree. Moreover, I'll
add that I have seen our own criminal justice system here in Texas commit far greater evil than this
sad tale.

PM me if you want the details.
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Old 05-29-2013, 06:06 PM   #15797
Pedro Navaja
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tricepilot View Post
...Solo is a great idea on pavement. Solo in the dirt, especially if you have limited experience, not so much a great idea...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sjoerd Bakker View Post
Raul. ....
As Trice said , riding Baja off road ALONE is not a good idea especially in summer when it can be very very hot in the interior . Also your bike choice , no doubt very good for dirt riding , would leave you stranded out of gas sooner or later off road and probably on the road too unless you have a big capacity tank . For a first trip or solo trip pavement is the smart way to survive. The dirt may attract you but it would require extreme planning of gas stops, something better accomplished by support crews and group rides.Alone on dirt trails is looking for problems either mechanical or bodily injury from a fall
Quote:
Originally Posted by rockymountainoyster View Post
Solo is a good idea on pavement but still risky. I think it is probably a real bad idea off road... too much that can happen, too remote.

A SPOT tracker is an essential piece of equipment but for it to be useful you have to subscribe to the additional services that they offer. Remember to wear it on you, not on the bike. You want to be found in an emergency.

The SPOT is conceptually great for calling the cavalry when and if you need them but what if there is no cavalry. My perception, having just done a highway ride in Baja is that the cavalry are few and far between. It does not matter if a SPOT notifies their emergency center and ten of your friends if there is no one that they can call to get help from. SPOT will cover two rescues of up to $50K for each event but you have to be a subscriber.

Some folks here are very big on MedJet Assist. Med Jet only provides air evacuation in the event of an emergency. If you get a foreign travel illness and accident policy see if it provides for air evacuation and what the limits are. There is no point in duplicating coverages but if you only have one MedJet is probably the one to have.

Lewis and Clark didn't have maps either, they were there to make them. They lost a lot of people.
Allow me to chime in wrt comments made on the above advice. However, first let me welcome you here. We have a lot of very experienced riders here who give great advice, most of whom I highly respect. I ride alone. Pavement or off-road. However, when I say off-road, I mean dirt roads like, Class 1 or Class 2, and I am using a street 250 cc with d/p tires. I have been to Baja, but have not ridden there. Nevertheless, I will give you my philosophy on riding solo.

1. If you haven't done it yet, try it on a short couple of over-night rides first. These rides should involve paved and dirt roads. You can even do this in California around the Bakersfield area, Mojave Desert, Cleveland National, etc., before tackling Mexico. I'm assuming you will be in California for a while.

2. Regarding SPOT. I carry it. I don't carry if for rescue, though I have that option enabled. I carry it to give peace of mind to my wife, and for body recovery (helps with life insurance if they can find the body if I don't make it back alive).

3. MedJet - I get it just in case.

4. Travel Medical Insurance - I get it just in case. I also carry a blood pathogen kit (surgical tools, needles, sutures, etc.) and a First Aid kit designed for hunters.

5. A lot of the above won't help if I crash & die out in the wilderness, nor will it help if I crash & die on a busy city street. The risk then is if you are partially injured and how quickly you can get or get to medical help. It's a risk management issue that you have to decide for yourself.

6. I don't use or carry a GPS but I am warming up to the idea. I use paper UTM maps for wilderness rides. I use Guia Roji for paved portions though also good for some dirt roads. In the wilderness I consider myself an excellent land navigator with a map & compass (US Army Ranger School graduate). I've spent lots of time alone in the world.

7. I would suggest you should know how to do the most common repairs on your bike of choice. You need to practice these repairs with your field tools and practice them regularly on your own. Fix a flat, repair a broken chain, cable and lever repairs, etc. Anything outside of the engine you should know how to do in the field. Can you carry the tools and the parts with you?

8. You need to know where you are in space and time continuously while on the ride. In advance of the ride you need to know what your plan will be if you fail at point B on your route, which might be different from a failure at point C on your route. In your mind you should run through the risk at these points, and then on the ride be cognizant of where the zones are where you would be fucked no matter what your contingency plan. You have to think your way through the ride before you make the ride, and know where the "you are fucked zones" are in advance.

9. Are you scared of the dark in the wilderness? Are you scared of being alone in the dark in the wilderness? Do wild animals freak you out in the day or night? How is your snake identification? Do you know how to sleep in the desert at night if you can't self extract at the point where you broke down an hour before sunset?

10. Do you know how to treat yourself medically and to what level? You have fallen and suffered a compound leg fracture an hour before sunset. Do you know what to do so that you won't bleed to death by morning? Is the tourniquet on you, or is it in the First Aid kit that you can't get to now?

11. Have you been in a hot environment and know the amount of water you need in a 36-hour period to sustain yourself. You can't get this out of a book, you need to experience it for yourself.

12. Look at the picture below. Nobody is coming for you if you have a failure out here. What is your plan and do you have the skills to execute it? Do you see those mountains way off in the distance there? Look hard at the picture. There is a city up in those mountains called Saltillo.

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Old 05-29-2013, 06:06 PM   #15798
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RaoulDuke13 View Post
At $260.00 a year I can get air lifted to the hospital of my choice. So I could be brought from the baja to Queens Hospital on Oahu and have my Doctor take charge.
Consider adding the motorcycle extraction rider to your MedJet Assist plan. Only $35.00/yr, IIRC. With any luck you'll be back on your feet with your TVIP (that you carried in your gear, not applied to the bike) and at least enough of the bike to read the VIN so your TVIP can be cleared and you can do it all over again.

Many members here pay for a smugmug.com subscription for a foto site. It works well with Advrider because it's the same folks and so it provides financial support for Advrider.com as well.
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"As long as there's a horizon and I can see it, then I want to know what's there, mentally, physically and visually" - rtwpaul
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Old 05-29-2013, 06:11 PM   #15799
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pedro Navaja View Post
Allow me to chime in wrt comments made on the above advice......
Mike, you should publish a survival manual for adventure riding. Seriously.
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"As long as there's a horizon and I can see it, then I want to know what's there, mentally, physically and visually" - rtwpaul
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Old 05-29-2013, 06:20 PM   #15800
Pedro Navaja
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SchizzMan View Post
Consider adding the motorcycle extraction rider to your MedJet Assist plan. Only $35.00/yr, IIRC. With any luck you'll be back on your feet with your TVIP (that you carried in your gear, not applied to the bike) and at least enough of the bike to read the VIN so your TVIP can be cleared and you can do it all over again.

Many members here pay for a smugmug.com subscription for a foto site. It works well with Advrider because it's the same folks and so it provides financial support for Advrider.com as well.
Yep, I get the extraction plan too, even though the bike insurance covers that as well. I like SmugMug. It's how I payback ADVrider
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Old 05-29-2013, 06:24 PM   #15801
Pedro Navaja
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Originally Posted by SchizzMan View Post
Mike, you should publish a survival manual for adventure riding. Seriously.
I'll leave that to Richard, Milton, and Sjoerd. Speaking of Richard I'm planning a paved backroads ride from Houston to Del Rio. Will pass well south of San Antonio this time. Then from there I will pick up Richard's ride from Langtry to Sonora on dirt and then come back down to Del Rio via paved. Should be fun. Testing out some new tires and some concepts.

Mexico in the fall. Probably late Sep, or early Oct.
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Old 05-29-2013, 06:28 PM   #15802
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SchizzMan View Post
Mike, you should publish a survival manual for adventure riding. Seriously.
Seriously, +1

Kind of the antithesis of my "grab some cash, a credit card and cell phone and go" kind of ride planning...
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Old 05-29-2013, 06:29 PM   #15803
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pedro Navaja View Post
I'll leave that to Richard, Milton, and Sjoerd. Speaking of Richard......
If you lurk twtex.com, check out his latest ride report from the K-Trail in Oklahoma and Arkansas
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Old 05-29-2013, 06:33 PM   #15804
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I am a single moto owner now! The KTM 990ADV is all I have. Can you get Road Side Assistance in Mexico? I received $400 of stuff this week and ordered another $250 plus today. I see Mexico in my near future! But, I ain't riding a bus!
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Old 05-29-2013, 06:45 PM   #15805
Arte OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pedro Navaja View Post
Allow me to chime in wrt comments made on the above advice. However, first let me welcome you here. We have a lot of very experienced riders here who give great advice, most of whom I highly respect. I ride alone. Pavement or off-road. However, when I say off-road, I mean dirt roads like, Class 1 or Class 2, and I am using a street 250 cc with d/p tires. I have been to Baja, but have not ridden there. Nevertheless, I will give you my philosophy on riding solo.

Excellent tips
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Old 05-29-2013, 06:50 PM   #15806
Pedro Navaja
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Originally Posted by tricepilot View Post
If you lurk twtex.com, check out his latest ride report from the K-Trail in Oklahoma and Arkansas
I have not met Richard in person. I see he is also a Ranger School graduate. Figures. I wonder what class. I did buy his three books which are some good stuff.

P.S. I would have never gotten in that tower. My clue is that 3 of the 4 guy lines were down.
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Old 05-29-2013, 10:02 PM   #15807
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Hovenweep

Quote:
Originally Posted by RaoulDuke13 View Post
Aloha Most of the older experienced off road guys have said just get the AAA map. So today I joined and have in my possession the highly regarded AAA Baja California map. Thanks for the emergenC advice. I believe in staying hydrated always. Funny thing I was just in Dolores Colorado two weeks ago picking up my Commando at Colorado Norton Works and put 500+ miles on the road in 4 days. I rode to Hoven Weep every day through the rain, hail, the cold and was it was a terrific time. I was also lucky enough to hang out with Sam Maganaro of Vincent Works in Dolores. I was there riding last August there also. The ride from Cortez to Telluride is one of the best roads I ever traveled on a road bike. It was so scenic and surreal. You are licky to live there.
If you have ridden into Hovenweep from the Dove Creek side in bad weather on a Norton Commando (What year? What tires?) You will do just fine in Mexico. Some of the roads in Mexico are like the Saddle Road on the Big Island, deserty, broken pavement, remote.

Were you here during the Vincent Rally last August? Several of the guys rode their bikes up from the rally. It was incredible to see those machines. There are a lot of pretty great roads around here for road and dual sport and some truly incredible roads for dual sport/dirt bikes. The only problem with living here is that the riding season is so short. It was f'ing spitting snow tonight and the high country has a fresh dusting.

It is amazing that we have Norton Works and Vincent Works in the same little town and then Basin Motorcycle Works down in Mancos... mostly see Harleys on the highway though. Only a two day ride to the border at Columbus/Palomas from here.
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Old 05-30-2013, 12:39 AM   #15808
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Originally Posted by rockymountainoyster View Post
If you have ridden into Hovenweep from the Dove Creek side in bad weather on a Norton Commando (What year? What tires?)

Were you here during the Vincent Rally last August? Several of the guys rode their bikes up from the rally.

It is amazing that we have Norton Works and Vincent Works in the same little town and then Basin Motorcycle Works down in Mancos... mostly see Harleys on the highway though. Only a two day ride to the border at Columbus/Palomas from here.
It is a 1974 and the tires are Avon Road Riders. I am not taking this bike to baja. It is all about my KTM 400 exc in Mexico. Been dreaming of riding it there. I left Colorado right before that Vincent Rally. In fact sam was working out of a barn back then. Now he has a shop on the main highway right after you go past the gas station and start to go down hill into dolores coming from Cortez. Yes it did Amaze me two epic Bike builders are so close to one another in Dolores Co. That part of the country is the Promised land. You are lucky to live and ride there.
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Old 05-30-2013, 01:34 AM   #15809
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pedro Navaja View Post
Allow me to chime in wrt comments made on the above advice. However, first let me welcome you here. We have a lot of very experienced riders here who give great advice, most of whom I highly respect. I ride alone. Pavement or off-road. However, when I say off-road, I mean dirt roads like, Class 1 or Class 2, and I am using a street 250 cc with d/p tires. I have been to Baja, but have not ridden there. Nevertheless, I will give you my philosophy on riding solo.

1. If you haven't done it yet, try it on a short couple of over-night rides first. These rides should involve paved and dirt roads. You can even do this in California around the Bakersfield area, Mojave Desert, Cleveland National, etc., before tackling Mexico. I'm assuming you will be in California for a while.

2. Regarding SPOT. I carry it. I don't carry if for rescue, though I have that option enabled. I carry it to give peace of mind to my wife, and for body recovery (helps with life insurance if they can find the body if I don't make it back alive).

3. MedJet - I get it just in case.

4. Travel Medical Insurance - I get it just in case. I also carry a blood pathogen kit (surgical tools, needles, sutures, etc.) and a First Aid kit designed for hunters.

5. A lot of the above won't help if I crash & die out in the wilderness, nor will it help if I crash & die on a busy city street. The risk then is if you are partially injured and how quickly you can get or get to medical help. It's a risk management issue that you have to decide for yourself.

6. I don't use or carry a GPS but I am warming up to the idea. I use paper UTM maps for wilderness rides. I use Guia Roji for paved portions though also good for some dirt roads. In the wilderness I consider myself an excellent land navigator with a map & compass (US Army Ranger School graduate). I've spent lots of time alone in the world.

7. I would suggest you should know how to do the most common repairs on your bike of choice. You need to practice these repairs with your field tools and practice them regularly on your own. Fix a flat, repair a broken chain, cable and lever repairs, etc. Anything outside of the engine you should know how to do in the field. Can you carry the tools and the parts with you?

8. You need to know where you are in space and time continuously while on the ride. In advance of the ride you need to know what your plan will be if you fail at point B on your route, which might be different from a failure at point C on your route. In your mind you should run through the risk at these points, and then on the ride be cognizant of where the zones are where you would be fucked no matter what your contingency plan. You have to think your way through the ride before you make the ride, and know where the "you are fucked zones" are in advance.

9. Are you scared of the dark in the wilderness? Are you scared of being alone in the dark in the wilderness? Do wild animals freak you out in the day or night? How is your snake identification? Do you know how to sleep in the desert at night if you can't self extract at the point where you broke down an hour before sunset?

10. Do you know how to treat yourself medically and to what level? You have fallen and suffered a compound leg fracture an hour before sunset. Do you know what to do so that you won't bleed to death by morning? Is the tourniquet on you, or is it in the First Aid kit that you can't get to now?

11. Have you been in a hot environment and know the amount of water you need in a 36-hour period to sustain yourself. You can't get this out of a book, you need to experience it for yourself.

12. Look at the picture below. Nobody is coming for you if you have a failure out here. What is your plan and do you have the skills to execute it? Do you see those mountains way off in the distance there? Look hard at the picture. There is a city up in those mountains called Saltillo.

Thanks for the Harsh reality info. I have hurt myself in the woods. I fractured my left wrist and massive contusions to my right foot ie; good thing I have an electric start besides a kicker. I have also fractured ribs at nite and got myself out. I am a pretty calm person when in trouble. I have lived and hike back country in Maine and Big Sur ca. I am a lone wolf type in the good sense. I do not try to pretend I am a medic. as far as desert survival I am not to hip other than believing I need to stay warm and Maybe a piece of plastic to help gather condensation in a cup over nite. I am not afraid of animals. I have caught rattle snakes and moved them to other locations for people. Yes mental attitude is very important. Think it and you can do it. Fear is not an option. I am not young anymore but still have great stamina. Maybe this trip I will spend more time on the road and gauge my gas mileage better that way. As I return up the coast I will know my range better and then I can hit dirt. I was going to carry two small aluminum bottles with gas. I am getting a larger gas tank for my 400 exc. Tomorrow I am going down to Ensanada to watch the score Tecate race. Just taking a car. I hope to get my perception right and ask allot of question while there. When I get back I will do as you said Change my tires by hand and put a new chain on the bike. I really appreciate everyones help here at advr. I will be back on here next week to catch up with you all!
Aloha and Mahalo's
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Old 05-30-2013, 03:10 AM   #15810
SchizzMan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dwj - Donnie View Post
I am a single moto owner now! The KTM 990ADV is all I have. Can you get Road Side Assistance in Mexico? I received $400 of stuff this week and ordered another $250 plus today. I see Mexico in my near future! But, I ain't riding a bus!
Now, if you were only homeless.......
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