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Old 05-15-2014, 09:40 AM   #22876
bingo43
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Check this out...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lilbloody View Post
Thanks, man.. much appreciated. I'm enjoying very much looking at your ride report, and the information it provides is golden.
My report is ok...but this one is golden:

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=494752

It's the one I patterned my ride after. There is a part where he breaks down each day of his ride and rates each segment and gives milage. He makes some great suggestions about how many miles you can ride each day through Mexico and Central America. It's very informative.
I'm reading back through it right now myself!
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Old 05-15-2014, 02:29 PM   #22877
Sjoerd Bakker
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Re :Frontera Corozal Crossing the Rio Usumacinta into Guatemala -- It is done quite regularly but it is mostly by Guatemalan and Mexican nationals .They do it and they have special dispensations, usually for short distance business and family visits. Tourists taking the boat trip to and from Yaxchilan ZA are allowed to get off the boat for a stroll in some of the Guatemalan villages , but they do go back to Mexico and FC. Then there are the backpacker set who have less requirements for documentation( or care less) and they find their way eventually with or without further complication.
.For foreign motorcyclists taking a bike across it is a different matter, there are the requirements of import permits for the bike, and Frontera Corozal has NO consistent Mexican Aduana or Banjercito representatives. If one wants to EXIT Mexico here it is a requirement to arrange the exit formalities ( cancel Tourist Card , cancel TVIP if not returning to Mexico) at another border crossing which does have those service which would be either La Mesilla or El Ceibo.And that is kind of silly because then you might as well ride through Guatemala to visit the river bank. .In Bethel , Guatemala also there is no permanent or easy to find customs and migration office so you would have to first seek out such services in GT to get cleared IN, before you can get cleared OUT. If you are heading to Belize anyway you could get this done at Melchor de Mencos , then immediately walk back inside to get your EXIT paper work to BZ done up. Then you enter Belize.
Trouble is that in the trip across Guatemala between these border points you might, not a certainty but a possibility, you might have some problem if a cop does a roadside check and finds you are not officially entered into GT. Raul got this figured out sort of and got away with it (post 151, Aventura Gigante,his RR) but at other border customs points the agents may not be as easygoing.
Not to say it cannot be done but it can turn into a big headache.
Also the physical effort to actually get the bike across can be very taxing if you have a really monstrous bike- possibility of getting dumped into the river , rushing high water in wet season ,struggling up steep sand banks with hired help. ( I am lazy in that respect =).

PS : on Guia Roji maps the town of Frontera Corozal is given as Frontera Echeveria ( a former name?)

Sjoerd Bakker screwed with this post 05-16-2014 at 01:16 PM
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Old 05-15-2014, 03:49 PM   #22878
goodwithafork
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sjoerd Bakker View Post
Re :Frontera Corozal Crossing the Rio Usumacinta into Guatemala -- It is done quite regularly but it is mostly by Guatemalan and Mexican nationals .They do it and they have special dispensations, usually for short distance business and family visits. Tourists taking the boat trip to and from Yaxchilan ZA are allowed to get off the boat for a stroll in some of the Guatemalan villages , but they do go back to Mexico and FC. Then there are the backpacker set who have less requirements for documentation( or care less) and they find their way eventually with or without further complication.
.For foreign motorcyclists taking a bike across it is a different matter, there are the requirements of import permits for the bike, and Frontera Corozal has NO consistent Mexican Aduana or Banjercito representatives. If one wants to EXIT Mexico here it is a requirement to arrange the exit formalities ( cancel Tourist Card , cancel TVIP if not returning to Mexico) at another border crossing which does have those service which would be either La Mesilla or El Ceibo.And that is kind of silly because then you might as well ride through Guatemala to visit the river bank. .In Bethel , Guatemala also there is no permanent or easy to find customs and migration office so you would have to first seek out such services in GT to get cleared IN, before you can get cleared OUT. If you are heading to Belize anyway you could get this done at Melchor de Mencos , then immediately walk back inside to get your EXIT paper work to BZ done up. Then you enter Belize.
Trouble is that in the trip across Guatemala between these border points you might, not a certainty but a possibility, you might have some problem if a cop does a roadside check and finds you are not officially entered into GT. Raul got this figured out sort of and got away with it (post 151, Aventura Gigante,his RR) but at other border customs points the agents may not be as easygoing.
Not to say it cannot be done but it can turn into a big headache.
Also the physical effort to actually get the bike across can be very taxing if you have a really monstrous bike- possibility of getting dumped into the river , rushing high water in wet season ,struggling up steep sand banks with hired help. ( I am lazy in that respect =).
Thanks for the rundown Sjoerd. I think I'll be taking the regular border crossing with that information :)
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Old 05-15-2014, 03:58 PM   #22879
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goodwithafork View Post
Hah, that looks intense. Is it a full on official border crossing with customs and all that jazz on the other side?
There is a little customs shack as you ride out of Bethel. The dude who owns the convenience store I slept behind took me there the next morning. There is no place to do the bike paperwork in Bethel so I just skipped it and acted confused when they wanted it upon departure of the country...

Here's the re-cap of the situation I wrote at the time: http://www.advrider.com/forums/showp...&postcount=151

This is the convenience store in Bethel:



This is one of the boys who lives there:



This is a pretty good reason to go to Guatemala:


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Old 05-15-2014, 07:31 PM   #22880
goodwithafork
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What are everyone's thoughts about finding parts down this way (Puerto Escondido)? I'm on a 2006 Suzuki V-Strom 650. I'm concerned about my brake pads at the moment, but am feeling a little clueless on sourcing replacements this far south and was too foolish to bring any with me (which was stupid).

Alternatively, how difficult would it be to have a box shipped down to Puerto Escondido, MX?

I think there's a dealership in Oaxaca city, but my spanish is not good enough to call and determine if they have the parts available or not. The rear is the only one I'm concerned about at the moment.

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Old 05-15-2014, 09:10 PM   #22881
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Originally Posted by MikeMike View Post
You will find them in Oaxaca. Get a friendly local to help you withe call. DHL has the best service record but you pay for it. The V-Strom pads are not to difficult to source and easy to change. Aftermarket shops will likely sell you EBC. If you are really stuck, a local shop here has them and I can help you make arrangements for shipping to Puerto via bus parcel from Veracruz.
Thanks Mike Mike! I found a dealer online in Oaxaca city and a friend is calling for me in the morning, so we'll see what unfolds. Cheers!
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Old 05-15-2014, 09:10 PM   #22882
dwj - Donnie
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Location: Traveling on the Moto or Escuitla, Chiapas, Mexico
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goodwithafork View Post
What are everyone's thoughts about finding parts down this way (Puerto Escondido)? I'm on a 2006 Suzuki V-Strom 650. I'm concerned about my brake pads at the moment, but am feeling a little clueless on sourcing replacements this far south and was too foolish to bring any with me (which was stupid).

Alternatively, how difficult would it be to have a box shipped down to Puerto Escondido, MX?

I think there's a dealership in Oaxaca city, but my spanish is not good enough to call and determine if they have the parts available or not. The rear is the only one I'm concerned about at the moment.

I had one side of a new pair of brake pads wear out in less than 1,500 miles on my current ride in Mexico. I think I had a defective pair. I spent some time looking for proper pads and found nothing. Then I stopped at a small place and saw a pair of pads that looked like the pin hole and the foot were about the same as mine, tried them on my 990 Adventure, but the metal part that fits into the caliper was shaped a bit different. The shop guy used my old pads as a template and a grinder to reshape the metal on the new pads. I have used them for over 2,000 miles and 2,000,000 Topes and they are working great! There was no charge for the shop time and I think I paid 290 pesos for the pads.
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Old 05-16-2014, 06:58 AM   #22883
dwj - Donnie
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Here is a couple of exerts from a RR I have going:

Things were going pretty well till we got to a permanent military check point. It had the longest line I have seen there before. But, we were able to split lanes and were through in 15 minutes or so. After another 100 miles we came upon a looong line. We passed vehicles for at least a mile. At one point Ana ask a person in a car and he said it was a check point. So we kept weaving through the traffic till we passed the livestock check point and I began thinking, this is the same place that a Union had the highway closed a couple months ago when I went to Mississippi. On that trip, I ended up back tracking, adding 100 miles to my route. Sure enough we could see some moto taxis had the MX200 highway blocked! This is the main highway on the west side of the mainland! It is a major trucking and traffic corridor!

As we got closer, I could see guys armed with cut off baseball bats and was thinking, we ain't going to get through this! Then a man in the group starts motioning me forward. I'm thinking, I wonder what this is about. I was not scared, just curious! When we got there he said they wanted pictures. At first I thought he wanted me to take pictures of the road being blocked, but no, they wanted pictures of some of their group sitting on the moto. No problem! They took some pictures, I took some pictures and then they moved some moto taxis and let us go on our way!


AND THE BEST PART IS, I DIDN'T HAVE TO HIT ANYONE!


We had breakfast and left the hotel at 8:30. The wind was blowing! At this location, the wind is blowing from the Gulf of Mexico across the mountains toward the Pacific Ocean. The worst and almost always present wind is at the intersection of MX185 and MX200. This intersection is located about 250 miles north of Tapachula, with the most fierce winds being from that intersection south for 25 miles. But, we had encountered very strong winds well south of there yesterday.

As we entered that 25 mile stretch, the winds were ferocious! Higher than anything I had ever ridden in and it was directly broad sided from the left, blowing to the right. You had to make sure that you was never closer that five feet from the side of another vehicle, because the wind was gusting from really hard to really really hard! I was still able to maintain 60 MPH or so, but it required maximum attention. I was up on the bars like you would be on some serious off road riding!

Then Ana starts screaming that she has side cramps and wants to stop! I am screaming back that it is very dangerous to stop here, but she continues to scream and begins to cry. So I stopped! I almost dropped the moto before coming to a complete stop because the side wind was so violent. When I came to a complete stop the winds were far worst than i had imagined! I expected it to be difficult to hold the moto up, I did not expect it to be so strong that within 10 seconds it would literally blow us over, spilling us and the moto onto the highway! The wind was so fierce, I could not get the side stand down due to the effort needed from my left leg to keep the moto from immediately blowing over.

Ana is still crying, but I think it is now due more to being scared than any pain she may have been feeling. I pick the moto up and am finally able to get the sidestand down by using my weight to hold the moto up while using my foot to deploy the side stand. A couple vehicles stopped, one being a taxi that was already full and Ana got in the car with them. I mounted the moto and was fighting to hold it up, thinking how am I going to get started without being blown over before I can get some speed going! The wind was still gusting from really strong to really really strong, so I waited for about 10 seconds and when the weaker wind arrived, I took off and gained speed very quickly!

Less than a mile up the road an 18 wheeler had been blown over! It did not run into a ditch and turn over, it had never left the road. The wind had literally blown it over! It may have been pulling two trailers, I am not for sure. I could not look long enough to make a determination, because it still took maximum attention to maintain control of the moto!

We finally got to a calmer area about ten miles up the road and Ana got out of the taxi. I tried to pay the driver, but he would not accept any money. Ana was very scared! I don't think she could remember the side pain that prompted the stop to begin with. She has been on medication for a couple weeks for some type of stomach infection. We had stopped by the doctor's office yesterday after we left her house for her to receive an injection and some pills.

While it took maximum effort and attention to control the moto, I did not feel in danger while riding. When I stopped was a different story. it took a while to convince Ana of this!

The RR is here: http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=954306
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Old 05-16-2014, 02:34 PM   #22884
goodwithafork
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Unrelated Question:

I may need to fly back into the United States for a family concern in the near future. What kind of difficulties can I expect coming out and into the country when I've got my motorcycle here. I intend to return of course, but I'm not sure what kind of hitch this throws in my life.

If it would be easier to accomplish out of another country further south I'm all ears for that as well. Complications, eh?
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Old 05-16-2014, 03:05 PM   #22885
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I don't think there is any problem flying out with your bike still there. I know several people have done it. As long as you don't let your TVIP lapse you should be OK.
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Old 05-16-2014, 03:26 PM   #22886
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Originally Posted by jimmex View Post
I don't think there is any problem flying out with your bike still there. I know several people have done it. As long as you don't let your TVIP lapse you should be OK.
Thanks for the info!

Oh, and listen to this great joke. My friend called about the brake pads at a Suzuki dealer in Oaxaca and they quoted 2800 for the rear pads and 3500 for each front pad. What on earth? So, I'll be sourcing them elsewhere to say the least.
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Old 05-16-2014, 05:09 PM   #22887
th00r
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tomorrow is the Sun to Sun Rally in Mexico, running from Veracruz to Acapulco one day.

There are some repair works along the way. Those who are attending Ride safe and keep us posted at your return.

QDLB
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Old 05-16-2014, 05:14 PM   #22888
George 99
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goodwithafork View Post
Thanks for the info!

Oh, and listen to this great joke. My friend called about the brake pads at a Suzuki dealer in Oaxaca and they quoted 2800 for the rear pads and 3500 for each front pad. What on earth? So, I'll be sourcing them elsewhere to say the least.
If yur headed home anyway, carry some spares when ya return...
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Old 05-16-2014, 06:09 PM   #22889
dwj - Donnie
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Location: Traveling on the Moto or Escuitla, Chiapas, Mexico
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goodwithafork View Post
Thanks for the info!

Oh, and listen to this great joke. My friend called about the brake pads at a Suzuki dealer in Oaxaca and they quoted 2800 for the rear pads and 3500 for each front pad. What on earth? So, I'll be sourcing them elsewhere to say the least.

I paid 290 pesos for mine. Check the post I put on earlier.
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Old 05-16-2014, 06:42 PM   #22890
Kiko
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Location: Jalisco, Mexico
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goodwithafork View Post
Thanks for the info!

Oh, and listen to this great joke. My friend called about the brake pads at a Suzuki dealer in Oaxaca and they quoted 2800 for the rear pads and 3500 for each front pad. What on earth? So, I'll be sourcing them elsewhere to say the least.
Mas grande del sapo, es la pedrada! (The larger the frog, the bigger the rock, you pay the gringo price)

Call Xavier Chavane at Chavane Motos Pro Shop Suzuki in Guadalajara. He is Belgian and speaks English. He will send to you Suzuki brake pads for much less.

You should be able to find those brake pads in Oaxaca for about no more than 600 pesos. I would source EBC, OEM, or Galfer.

http://www.motochavane.com.mx/
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