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Old 02-24-2013, 08:40 AM   #13336
acejones
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Originally Posted by tricepilot View Post
Pretty interesting stuff. Viva Mexico !
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Old 02-24-2013, 09:11 AM   #13337
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Pretty interesting stuff. Viva Mexico !
Accounts for the inflation of the past year, especially in the Frontier. The middle class is growing faster in Mexico than in the US.
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Old 02-24-2013, 09:17 AM   #13338
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Originally Posted by acejones View Post
Pretty interesting stuff. Viva Mexico !

Mexico is an upcoming economic power and many changes will be seen in the coming decade.

I also agree with this comment posted for the article:
*Could Mexico owe its "success" to the fact that it has outsourced most of its poverty to the US? The US taxpayer now subsidizes 25% of Mexico's population by educating, housing, and feeding them, etc. To add to this Mexican citizens in the US remit almost all of their tax-free earnings back to Mexico tax free.*

The "Border" is becoming more of a landmark than a division. Don't get me wrong. I was pissed when Oklahoma drove out all the illegal aliens. These college kids want $15 an hour to mow the grass. A guy running an auto salvage said he was happy to see them go, so I asked him....How's business?...."Slow"' he replied.
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Old 02-24-2013, 09:21 AM   #13339
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Anyway, we split up after we crossed the border. Tom had to get to Mazatlan to meet someone...........
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So where did Tom end up going after y'all split up? How far south did he make it before he had to turn around?
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Old 02-24-2013, 09:27 AM   #13340
AndyT
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Originally Posted by tricepilot View Post
And then this article

http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/...0BN0IE20130223

says that foreign investment dropped 35% from 2011 to 2012. 56% of foreign investmentwass from the USA vs. 49% in 2011, according to another Rueters article, that tells me the US in still investing there while other countries are pulling back. There is a computer school on every street corner in Mexico, so it wouldn't surprise me if Mexico became a bigger player in the world economy, but I don't see it happening unless they get violence and corruption controlled better.
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Old 02-24-2013, 09:31 AM   #13341
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Originally Posted by AndyT View Post
And then this article

http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/...0BN0IE20130223

says that foreign investment dropped 35% from 2011 to 2012. 56% of foreign investmentwass from the USA vs. 49% in 2011, according to another Rueters article, that tells me the US in still investing there while other countries are pulling back. There is a computer school on every street corner in Mexico, so it wouldn't surprise me if Mexico became a bigger player in the world economy, but I don't see it happening unless they get violence and corruption controlled better.
Or at least the VIOLENCE. A friend who is a major oilfield supplier said yesterday that he would never go back.
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Old 02-24-2013, 09:35 AM   #13342
tricepilot
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unless they get violence and corruption controlled better
Sure glad we have none of that here!

...oooops, just annoyed the comparison guy
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Old 02-24-2013, 09:38 AM   #13343
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Originally Posted by SchizzMan View Post
So where did Tom end up going after y'all split up? How far south did he make it before he had to turn around?
Tierra del Fuego (spelling?) I believe. He rode as far as he could and then caught transportation of some sort to go even further south. I am not sure how far the roads actually go down there.

He then turned around and rode to an IBA gig in Alaska before he went home.

Helluva rider. I met him when I signed his paperwork for a 4 corners (Key West, San Diego, Washington, then Maine) ride. He paused in Jacksonville long enough to throw in a 50CC while he was doing the 4 corners.
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Old 02-24-2013, 09:44 AM   #13344
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It's So Nice Being Re-Tired

Hank just put on a new set of Tourances on my bike, but for next month's destination (Cabo), he'll be putting on a set of these Heidenaus:



It's what he wanted to put on in the first place, but I (foolishly) resisted.

I'm told these are not perfect when the road is wet, but will be (much) better for the dirt in Baja.

No, I will not be taking the GS anywhere near deep sand. Thanks for asking!
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Old 02-24-2013, 09:59 AM   #13345
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Pretty interesting stuff. Viva Mexico !
Very interesting indeed.

Interesting that the article talks about the availability of cheap natural gas. Maybe a decade ago the brewery in Piedras Negras was delayed because Mexico was waiting for a natural gas pipeline to be built from San Antonio. Even today a lot of maps of the Eagle Ford Shale Field end at the border, giving a lot of people the false impression that Mexico has none of that field which is geologically improbable.

Article here saying that the Zetas are at play around Piedras Negras and other towns in the area. Once again, however, not spending their time picking on moto tourists:

http://www.mysanantonio.com/news/loc...co-3886818.php
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Old 02-24-2013, 10:23 AM   #13346
Jick Magger
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Originally Posted by tricepilot View Post
Interesting article TP. Received this from a consultant friend in Calgary who works in strategic planning with companies. Sends out a newsletter monthly. Often its personal observation. No earth shattering publication but always interesting..

Worst Undeserved Bad Rap: Mexico City


If I believed the press, I'd be sucking air through a gas mask, cowering in the apartment with an armed guard outside.
Instead, I'm sitting at an airy outdoor cafe by a broad boulevard, in the sun, reveling in the cosmopolitan scene. I haven't seen anyone with a gun so far, which is more than I can say for Texas which I just left! No knock on Texas, but we Canadians are sensitive.
I'm here visiting my son, Evan, and his partner, Erin. These two have crafted an original context for themselves [with the gracious help of Evan's employer, Trans Canada] which has to be seen to be appreciated, particularly after all the distortion this place receives. I'm so glad they're here, so I could come!
Sure, when we descended past the volcanoes, it was through a brown cloud hanging over the City. There are third world moments on the way from the airport. Lines of cinder block buildings along overcrowded roads with roll up shutters protecting shops that are otherwise open to the street. Lots of traffic and lots of people.
But here in Polanco, it's like Paris, New York. Tree lined generous streets. Many more public spaces than many American cities. And attractive prospects everywhere. I'm drawn to get out, go walking, take in what's on offer.
Yesterday, we strolled far, over to Reforma through streets named for philosophers and poets. Horacio has a generous walk right down the middle of a green boulevard median with a row of trees on either side distancing it from the roadway. There are public fountains in the roundabouts and fashionable folks out walking their small dogs in the warm air. Today, we will enjoy another initiative driving down pollution as we bike along one set of blocked lanes on Reforma. We can go for miles - well, kilometers, all the way to the Zocalo City Centre on this major avenue, open only to pedestrians and bikes on Sundays. This is common in Latin America. Unknown in Canada or the US in my experience.
This young couple is on a constant diet of great performances and fine art - Jamiroquai is coming. Grizzly Bear is Thursday. Madonna was just here. The Red Hot Chili Peppers are on their way. Latin Jazz at a club tonight. The brash and brand new Soumaya gallery [pictured], a world scale offering among many dazzling museums and exhibition spaces.
When Cortes beheld the then lake City Tenochtitlan, he declared the gardens, structure and organization much more sophisticated than any he had experienced in Europe. Mexico was then the most populous, cleanest and most galvanizing metropolis on the globe. It was an intoxicating vision.
People should come back! They might be surprised. No, shocked, at what awaits them.
Sincerely,

Doug Bouey
Catalyst Strategic Consultants Ltd.
TEC 217 Chair
Helping people of fine character extend their impact
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Old 02-24-2013, 10:25 AM   #13347
Jick Magger
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Here is his most recent newsletter ...

Doug Bouey
Catalyst Strategic Consultants Ltd.
Blog



February 4, 2013
Thoughts from a Mexican Courtyard...


Parked here in the Casa Colonial in Cuernavaca, one could be forgiven for drifting around. Someone from looking at the photo said, "The pool's not even frozen over!"
Fascinating to be in Mexico picking up a sunburn and picking up on what's happening here.
Mexico has not been a fine, evolved culture in my experience. It's not like Europe where traditional fine craftsmanship and exquisite art ruled for so long. But Europe's out of gas now and Mexico is on fire. It's not like it was never the world leader in fine art. When the spoils of Cortez were displayed in Brussels, the stellar quality, the unbelievable richness and depth of craftsmanship and artistic work of the Aztecs embarrassed the Euros. They were literally of another world. So, that was a problem that had to be fixed.
Not without regret on Cortes' part. He regretted that the Aztecs would not come to heel: to stop fighting his advance on the wondrous floating city of Mexico. His grief at destroying it [and them] did not curtail him. Superbly related in "Conquistador" [I found it by fluke], the improbably named Buddy Levy - a former prof at UW - has told a moment by moment riveting tale of the bravado and unrelenting drive of Cortes. Far from a sure thing - on the ropes several times, the conquest prevailed: to the great loss of the majestic Aztec culture and the profit of Spain [and France, to whom some of the treasure was delivered by piracy]. Maybe if they hadn't done that human sacrifice thing...

Now its their time. The future belongs to Latin America.
The surge of economic activity - 5.4% GDP this year is the ITR projection for Mexico this year - is palpable. Ours? Canada, US are in the 3% neighborhood with a projected minor recession in the offing for 2014.
Here, there's drive for reform, openness to investment, for modernizing infrastructure. It's relentless south of the Rio Grande, in many many Latin countries. There are compelling and undeterred new breed politicians who must and will make this happen. And it is - in Brazil, Colombia, Mexico. They are overcoming the status quo. Not much of that around us...

We really must amend our reflexive assessments of Mexico.
It's not violent. Sure there are stories about violence and there are areas of violence. Same as home.
There is great inequality. A huge gap between rich and poor. However, here, it's being filled by a new middle class. Ours is widening - termed the Great Divergence in the N Y Times Magazine - contributing to our relative decline. The engine of prosperity? A middle class with discretionary income to spend.
Mexico is not educationally impaired. There are some fine institutions heres Students - and others - work hard, get ahead in technical professions. Better than the surfeit of artists and musicians being allowed to believe there is a future for them [other than as hobbyists] north of the line. Students here are not comfortable, entitled.
But most important? There will be lots of them. The demographics- one third of Mexico's population is under 15. Babies are everywhere. Remember when that was true of "North America"? And what that necessarily foretold? These up and comers have a justified appetite for the good life and the willingness for work for it. So they will generate that...and they have the market to back it up.
It works - the country works. Biz gets done, projects move ahead. People get where they need to be. Unlike India, the power and water are always on. The people are healthy - well cared for in the national scheme.
Oh, and did I mention it works in Spanish? There is no hegemony of English in the heartland. Seeing someone from north of the border - hearing an English speaker - is an event here in Cuernavaca. Mexico is not the beach world dominated by white tanners we think of. Not anywhere near all of it...
Better brush up! They don't seem to need English here to do just fine, thank you. Maybe we need to lean their way....

Sincerely,

Doug Bouey
Catalyst Strategic Consultants Ltd.
TEC 217 Chair
Helping people of fine character extend their impact
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Old 02-24-2013, 10:25 AM   #13348
tricepilot
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Concept configuration.

Leaving the boxes home.
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Old 02-24-2013, 10:29 AM   #13349
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A lot of Europeans and Canadians have discovered Mexico, or at least they have discovered the resorts around Tampico.

I often think that the tourism business in the USA, perhaps lead by Florida, has a hand in promoting many of those stories about how bad Mexico is, how bad Cuba is, etc.


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Old 02-24-2013, 10:30 AM   #13350
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tricepilot View Post
Hank just put on a new set of Tourances on my bike, but for next month's destination (Cabo), he'll be putting on a set of these Heidenaus:



It's what he wanted to put on in the first place, but I (foolishly) resisted.

I'm told these are not perfect when the road is wet, but will be (much) better for the dirt in Baja.

No, I will not be taking the GS anywhere near deep sand. Thanks for asking!
You have great taste.
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