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Old 05-18-2011, 10:21 AM   #526
Jurgen OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by madeouttaglass View Post
Butt look what you're getting for that $9K!
Homina, homina, homina!
That was the extra feature I was refering to. I'm a gam man.
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Originally Posted by Bertrand_Russell
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Old 05-18-2011, 03:41 PM   #527
BMWzenrider
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I have been working my way towards smaller and smaller the last few years and like this thread.

Back in 2001 I went on the road full-time for a few years, so I started out with a 30-foot Class-A motorhome pulling an aluminum framed 6x12 enclosed trailer for the bike.



I didn't really like dealing with the short wheelbase trailer behind the long wheelbase motorhome when backing up, and I didn't have the knees to move it around unhooked by myself, so I quickly designed and built a platform lift for the rear of the RV to carry the bike and ditched the trailer.




That combo worked pretty well when I was living in it full-time with my two cats, and it took me pretty far afield...




{I saw that bumper sticker in Alaska and HAD to get it...}

Eventually, I even added an extendable outrigger rail to allow me to carry my sidecar rig on the back when I was traveling to winter destinations and still wanted to ride. (The sidecar never fit inside of the 6' wide trailer)

-------------

However, as some have mentioned, I found myself doing less riding and more driving. And even once I got parked, I tended to spend more time inside than out. When you basically have a small apartment on wheels it can be very seductive, particularly with some of the disabilites that I have.

So as the kitties got older and I lost one, then the other, I began to think about downsizing.

--------------

As Bueller has also correctly pointed out, a self-contained motorhome is a VERY high maintenace item, and if you don't keep up with it deterioration accelarates quickly.

For those of us who like to traverse some dirt/gravel roads it can be especially tough on a big stick-frame structure on a flexible frame...

I usually treated and resealed the roof twice a year to prevent leakage (Spring & Fall).
There was ALWAYS some area that was beginning to show deterioration when I went up to check it. The heat/UV of Summer dried things out, and the heat/cold cycling of winter along with the flexing of the box on the frame while driving opens up seams constantly.

---------------

When I downsized I looked at several options.
I wanted to still be able to travel and have someplace to sleep at night, as well as someplace to retreat to when I get a migraine during the day.

And part of my camping is what I call "Stealth Camping".
I.E. pulling in just for the night and moving on in the morning while I am traveling en-route to someplace. Not really wanting to wanting to spend time setting up an elaborate campsite, and preferably not needing to pay for the night where I stop...

The Class-A worked pretty well for that; I could pull into any Freeway rest-area or a truck stop or even a WallyWorld for the night.
Something that needs to be "set up" is a bit more conspicuous and less secure in those situations.

The options I considered for a replacement rig included Toy-Haulers, Tent campers, Tiny/Teardrops, and Class-B.
Here are my thoughts:

- Toy-Haulers:
Most require you to unload your bike in order to set it up for sleeping in. That means you can't just pull into a rest-area or truck stop for the night very easily. And as others have pointed out, after you park a vehicle inside you CAN smell the fuel for a while.
Secure storage for bikes, gear enroute; secure sleeping quarters with good room inside. Good versatility for other uses. (Cargo capability) Requires separate tow vehicle. Custom built toy haulers more expensive than standard cargo trailer.

- Tent Camper:
Requires that it be set up to sleep in it. Prevents use in truck stops & rest areas. Not good to take down when wet. Not as secure against animals or theft. Not as well insulated (temp or sound).
Often less expensive to purchase. Requires separate tow vehicle. Harder to bring along bike unless buying more expensive hybrid version (balance?).

- Tiny/Teardrop:
Small, light, relatively less expensive, easy to store. Smaller models can be towed by bikes so no separate tow vehicle required. Secure storage & sleeping quarters. Warmer and more quiet (insulation). No set-up/tear-down.
No bath facilities, less storage space, more confined living area. (Encourages getting OUT rather than staying inside...)
A heavy trailer can push around a bike in the twisties.

- Class-B/Sprinter:
Expensive vs. other types of campers/RVs. Dedicated camper/vehicle not as versatile as a separate tow vehicle. High profile makes them hard to drive in crosswinds. Models with add-on caps suceptible to leaking. Models with dropped floors for extra headroom have also reported problems in that area. Toilet is usually in a fold/pull-out closet and not as convenient.

----------

So here is what I ended up choosing to do....



I hung my camping pod off the side of my bike....



I made the netting top for warm nights, and on raining or cooler nights I just leave the hatch closed.
It has 15 cubic feet of trunk space, a deep cycle battery to allow lights/fan/laptop/etc., and handles like a dream!
It even enhances stability on loose surfaces. I have ridden on hundreds of miles of dirt/gravel and washboard with this rig.

I have thought about building a teardrop body to put on the sidecar frame in place of the passenger body when I take long tours.
But so far I have been pretty comfortable simply reclining the seat and stretching out inside the stock body.
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Old 05-18-2011, 06:08 PM   #528
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BMWzenrider View Post



So here is what I ended up choosing to do....



I hung my camping pod off the side of my bike....



I made the netting top for warm nights, and on raining or cooler nights I just leave the hatch closed.
It has 15 cubic feet of trunk space, a deep cycle battery to allow lights/fan/laptop/etc., and handles like a dream!
It even enhances stability on loose surfaces. I have ridden on hundreds of miles of dirt/gravel and washboard with this rig.

I have thought about building a teardrop body to put on the sidecar frame in place of the passenger body when I take long tours.
But so far I have been pretty comfortable simply reclining the seat and stretching out inside the stock body.

Your way of thinking is exactly like mine, just a little more minimalist. I just went local trucking after 2.5 years on the road, so I learned a few things about living is a small space (KW W900 sleeper). I had a 1500w inverter for my microwave, toaster & coffee pot. I had a 12v Igloo cooler where my milk has lasted more than a week. I bought a couple of sport drink bottles with pop tops to take fill in birdbaths between truck stop showers. I always had a supply of unscented wet wipes. My hair was washed daily and teeth brushed as well. Number 1's were done in a sealed bottle and I had a Luggable Loo/scented trash bags for the times I couldn't wait to get to a real restroom. The size of the sleeper would be comparable to an Astrovan in length. McDonalds supplies free wifi at 1000's of their restaurants. It's doable in a smaller, stealthier vehicle..

Check out: http://cheaprvliving.com/ for great ideas, not sure if it's 205 or not..
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Old 05-18-2011, 06:09 PM   #529
madeouttaglass
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Now THAT is downsizing to an extreme! Wow.
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Old 05-18-2011, 11:16 PM   #530
Jurgen OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by madeouttaglass View Post
Now THAT is downsizing to an extreme! Wow.
extra-special wow for doing it on a bike.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bertrand_Russell
One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid, and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision.




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Old 05-19-2011, 12:05 AM   #531
Maggot12
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I think a conversion van wold be a nice suitable option, while pulling your motorcycle. Self contained, nearly all the amenities of a larger motorhome but a fraction of the size and upkeep.
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Old 05-19-2011, 04:53 AM   #532
MoBill
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That's here:


http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=434542
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Old 05-19-2011, 06:23 AM   #533
Icewalker
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Old 05-19-2011, 10:22 AM   #534
BMWzenrider
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jurgen View Post
extra-special wow for doing it on a bike.
Thanks.

So far I have gone up to six weeks living out of this rig and haven't really missed the big RV much at all.
It is definitely nicer to ride the bike the whole way while dragging the camper than the other way around.

And it is still quite a bit of fun to ride.
My rig was the featured photo of the day on both Killboy's and US129's websites when I rocked Deal's Gap a couple of years ago...





The sidecar rig is also quite a bit less thirsty than my old RV! $$$$$$

The best fuel economy I ever got with the 30-foot Class-A was 10mpg.
That was coming down-slope out of the Rockies with a tailwind after installing headers and pulling the cat.
Normal fuel economy with the bike on the lift was 7-9mpg. When I was pulling the trailer it was 6-8mpg.

The worst I ever got with this sidecar rig has been a run into a 25-30mph headwind with gusts to 45mph according to the NWS, and an average speed of 76mph for the 125 mile leg. The fuel economy for that run was pretty poor at 24.6mpg.
Normally I get between 32-38 depending upon how heavily loaded and how heavily I twist my wrist.
Not bad considering I have nearly tripled my frontal area and created a forced funnel of air between the two halves.

----------

However, while the extra deep trunk offers lots of storage, it is not optimum for long-term travel because you need to unload most of the cargo to get at anything down in the bottom.
And getting in/out of the sidecar with the seat reclined into a bed in not optimum either, since you are climbing over the sidewall which is a bit awkward the way it is now.
And if it is raining you still have to open the roof to get in/out, which exposes your bedding.

Those are the main reasons that I have been thinking about building a teardrop body to install for my longer tours.
To have a sleeping area that has easier entry/exit without exposing the area to weather,
and to have a more organized packing/storage system for easier access to things without having to dig/repack.
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Old 05-19-2011, 11:12 AM   #535
BMWzenrider
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scootertrash View Post
Your way of thinking is exactly like mine, just a little more minimalist. I just went local trucking after 2.5 years on the road, so I learned a few things about living is a small space (KW W900 sleeper). I had a 1500w inverter for my microwave, toaster & coffee pot. I had a 12v Igloo cooler where my milk has lasted more than a week. I bought a couple of sport drink bottles with pop tops to take fill in birdbaths between truck stop showers. I always had a supply of unscented wet wipes. My hair was washed daily and teeth brushed as well. Number 1's were done in a sealed bottle and I had a Luggable Loo/scented trash bags for the times I couldn't wait to get to a real restroom. The size of the sleeper would be comparable to an Astrovan in length. McDonalds supplies free wifi at 1000's of their restaurants. It's doable in a smaller, stealthier vehicle..

Check out: http://cheaprvliving.com/ for great ideas, not sure if it's 205 or not..
Go to a beauty supply store and you can get waterless shampoo.
Just massage it through your hair and dry with a towel.
Great for dry camping!
Found out about that product when I had my car accident and was bedridden in the hospital for over a month.

Baby wipes are great for washing without water as well, and easy to carry out with you.

For clothing I pack the poly sports shirts/shorts which can be washed/rinsed in a sink at the end of the day and usually hang dry overnight.
If they are still damp the next morning you can stuff them in a mesh bag strapped across the back seat and let the breeze finish the job.
They also feel much cooler in hot weather than the traditional cotton Tees...

Had a buddy who had a dry camper who used a 5-gallon bucket with a potty seat attachment for his "bathroom".
He carried a plastic tub of scoopable kitty litter which he used to soak up any liquid & odor in the bucket/bag between dumpter stops.
Just sprinkled some litter over the top after each time.
It works for cats...
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Old 05-19-2011, 12:04 PM   #536
ADW
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What about the bike?

I haven't read every page of the thread, so I apologize if this has been asked and answered, but, where can/do you put the bike? If I were to get one of these I couldn't pull my bike trailer with the KLR on it. So it's one or the other, bike or living quarters. My tow vehicle is not a pickup.

I'd really be interested in a micro trailer to stay in but without the bike with me it isn't much good. Is there a way to do both? I realize the easy answer is "no, dumbass...you've gotta pick one or the other", but hey, you don't know until you ask. So....
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Old 05-19-2011, 01:03 PM   #537
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Originally Posted by ADW View Post
I haven't read every page of the thread, so I apologize if this has been asked and answered, but, where can/do you put the bike? If I were to get one of these I couldn't pull my bike trailer with the KLR on it. So it's one or the other, bike or living quarters. My tow vehicle is not a pickup.

I'd really be interested in a micro trailer to stay in but without the bike with me it isn't much good. Is there a way to do both? I realize the easy answer is "no, dumbass...you've gotta pick one or the other", but hey, you don't know until you ask. So....
My tow vehicle is a van with 2 or three bikes in it.
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Old 05-19-2011, 01:59 PM   #538
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ADW View Post
I haven't read every page of the thread, so I apologize if this has been asked and answered, but, where can/do you put the bike? If I were to get one of these I couldn't pull my bike trailer with the KLR on it. So it's one or the other, bike or living quarters. My tow vehicle is not a pickup.
There are some tiny toy haulers back a few pages
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Old 05-19-2011, 07:38 PM   #539
DirtDabber
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What kind of vehicle would you be using?
Would something like this work?
http://www.golittleguy.com/teardrops.../6-wide-sport/
With the axle that far back there is no way to keep the tongue weight correct.
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Old 05-19-2011, 08:10 PM   #540
Jason F.
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The reason for the axle placement is that in a traditional Teardrop most of the weight is in the rear section. The hatch, related hardware, and primarily the galley hang much of the weight off the back. They simply took a traditional teardrop and tacked a platform out front completely throwing off the balance. Sounds like the really goofed and they know it.

Just tacking the platform to the back would also screw up the traditional tear drop function as well. It would be a real pain to make breakfast in the morning if the bikes were hanging off the back and you could not get to the stove.
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