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Old 03-09-2010, 02:37 PM   #1
klaviator OP
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Global Warming in Georgia

Global warming in Georgia? The weather forecast for the weekend indicated that Global warming might be returning but I had stuff to do. I still hadn't washed the mud off my KLR from two weeks ago, I had 2 new rear tires that needed mounting, and the valves on my XT needed adjustment. I really shouldn't go riding this weekend. I probably shouldn't go riding this weekend. I just washed the KLR. I have already pulled a bunch of parts off my XT. The rear tire on the DR is worn out. OK, maybe an easy ride up to Two Wheels Only for lunch. I'll even truck it half way up.

Sunday morning the weather is not as sunny as predicted. And its cooold. Where is that Global Warming? Maybe I need to call Al Gore!

I finally load up the DR and drove from Marietta to Ellijay I come up with a plan. I want to take it easy but I do have some unfinished business. Two weeks ago I led a ride which was titled "First Annual North Georgia Global Warming & Drought Ride. The plan was to ride Old Bucktown Rd over Nimblewill Gap. We changed out minds at the last minute due to reports of "less than ideal conditions". We took FS42 instead. This is an easy FS road often used by cars and minivans to get to the start of the A. T. here's a few Pics from that ride.

The group at the beginning of FS42. 10 KLRs and 1 DRZ:
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klaviator screwed with this post 03-09-2010 at 03:01 PM
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Old 03-09-2010, 02:45 PM   #2
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Some more Pics:


It was a good day to try out my new Fulmer DS helmet:


We get pulled over by the ranger who wants to make sure we have current Ski passes


More details and pics of this ride are here: http://www.klr650.net/forums/showthread.php?t=76586
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Old 03-09-2010, 02:55 PM   #3
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Back to the current ride. I park the truck at Wally World in Ellijay and unload the bike. It's warmed up nicely so I leave my winter gloves in the truck and head off. It's 11:10 and TWO will be serving lunch till 2:00. It's only about 50 miles so I should be able to make it for lunch no problem.

I decide to take a look at Old Bucktown Road. I've heard reports about it being in really bad shape from all the wet weather. It's been almost a week since the last snowstorm and I'm not sure I believe the reports. Besides, it is unfinished business from 2 weeks ago.

The bike is really nice and clean so I'll go up a way and turn around if it looks bad.

My nice and clean DR250


I ride up a ways and stop to take some pics:

Looking back:


Looking forward:
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Old 03-09-2010, 03:37 PM   #4
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At this point I should turn around. This road is up hill all the way to Nimblewill Gap. I'll just go a little bit further. It hasn't been bad so far.
I ride a little further:


And a little further.


looking ahead.
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Old 03-09-2010, 04:18 PM   #5
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I really should turn around. The Kenda 270's on the bike have over 2000 miles on them and the knobs on the rear tire are now only very short nubs. A year ago I would have turned around. Now, I don't even consider it. I think I've been reading way too many ride reports. In the last few months I have followed Sambor through Afghanistan, Colebatch along the BAM Road and through countries I can't spell or pronounce, Timolgria through Mongolia, and metaljockey cheating death in Angola. I think these reports have warped my mind. How dangerous can this adventure riding be? I didn't see any warnings or disclaimers on any of these reports. No: "Do not try this at home". No "Professional riders on closed course" No warning by the surgeon general. Hey, if I hurt myself I'm sure I can sue someone

So I ride on. At this point my rear tire is mostly spinning. The only sign of traffic through here are some ATV tracks. I try riding in the tracks but the rear tire doesn't aways cooperate. If there is any slope the tire slides that way. Anytime I hit a slightly steeper slope I have trouble going forward. I often have to back up and try again. I'm also pushing the bike along. I'm now sweating like a pig so I take off all the layers underneath my jacket, open the vents, and put on my summer gloves. I should have put that new Shinko 244 on yesterday. It's doing me a lot of good sitting in my basenment. I get to the point where I have to take a break every 50 yards or so:


Finally I see the top. Looks like less snow too.


The DR parked by the airplane crash plaque at Nimblewill Gap.


here's the plaque:
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Old 03-09-2010, 05:53 PM   #6
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I take a break for awhile but I'm running behind schedule. The last few miles have taken well over an hour. So I head down the hill. I can actually use something other than first gear This is fun

Here's the view looking back.



Looking forward there's a little of that white stuff, but not too bad.


I continue a little further.


This is completely different from the other side of the Gap. There has been some traffic here. This is hardpacked snow and ice. It's a lot slicker than the snow coming up but now I have gravity on my side.

Eventually I get to the pavement. I stop to put my warmer gloves back on and close the vents on my jacket and pants. Time to twist the throttle to try to get to TWO in time for lunch. For those who know the area, I take FS28-1 to the ranger Camp. FS80 up to FS42. Across FS42 and down Gaddistown RD. There is some snow and ice on the top of Gaddistown Rd but I've got this motorskiing stuff down good so it's not a problem. Then a right on 60 and up to TWO. I get there 5 minutes before 2:00 so I run in and order lunch. It turns out that there are still plenty of customers and they continue taking orders past 2 anyway.

I go back out to take a few pics.

There's a number of street bikes out front.


and some muddy KTMs out back.
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Old 03-09-2010, 06:49 PM   #7
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Something's wrong with this global warming thing.. you've got more snow there than we do here!!
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Old 03-10-2010, 06:53 AM   #8
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I always enjoy lunch at TWO. Besides the great food, there are always interesting people to talk to. I have met people from all over the world here. On this day I ended up having lunch with some people who lived in this building before it became TWO. Frank Cheek, the founder and original owner of TWO, lived here with his family before it became TWO. The family lived upstairs and they had a restaraunt downstairs. Frank passed away last fall but some of his "children" (it's hard to think of people my age as children) were here today for lunch. It was interesting hearing their stories.

After lunch it was time to head back. I decided to take a different route back. Heading north on 60 I stopped to take a pic. This is one of my favorite stretches of twisty pavement. Today it was covered with sand, salt, gravel and some running water. It was still fun but no peg scraping today
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Old 03-10-2010, 08:13 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by klaviator
I really should turn around. The Kenda 270's on the bike have over 2000 miles on them and the knobs on the rear tire are now only very short nubs. A year ago I would have turned around. Now, I don't even consider it. I think I've been reading way too many ride reports. In the last few months I have followed Sambor through Afghanistan, Colebatch along the BAM Road and through countries I can't spell or pronounce, Timolgria through Mongolia, and metaljockey cheating death in Angola. I think these reports have warped my mind. How dangerous can this adventure riding be? I didn't see any warnings or disclaimers on any of these reports. No: "Do not try this at home". No "Professional riders on closed course" No warning by the surgeon general. Hey, if I hurt myself I'm sure I can sue someone

So I ride on.
We have here in Europe a problem with global warming also. So I deceided to keep my twin in garage. But after your pics I realized I am too weak. It was -12 Celsius degrees this morning in Cracow but I will ride somewhere next week ;)
You are tough!
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Old 03-10-2010, 08:49 AM   #10
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We have here in Europe a problem with global warming also. So I deceided to keep my twin in garage. But after your pics I realized I am too weak. It was -12 Celsius degrees this morning in Cracow but I will ride somewhere next week ;)
You are tough!
Not all that tough. Despite all the snow it was actually pretty warm here. (about +10 to 15 celsius) The next day as I was driving south of Atlanta, I was using the air conditioning in my truck. Anyway, nothing I've done compares to your ride through Afghanistan. I really enjoyed reading your report. Someday, when I grow up, I may try to do a long adventurous ride too!
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Old 03-10-2010, 02:13 PM   #11
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As I continue north on 60, the elevation drops, the temperature increases, the snow on the side of the road decreases, and the road becomes cleaner.
60 is a nice scenic road with plenty of curves. I stop to take a pic.


As I get ready to go, a Hayabusa comes by heading north. I love chasing sport bikes on a muddy dual sport , so I get back on the road and unleash all 20 or so horsepower of the mighty DR250. I catch up after a couple of curves. Unlike most of the hayabusa's I have come across, this one has a rider who actually knows how to ride and is moving along at a respectable pace. I would have to abuse the DR's engine to pass this one so I follow along for awhile then turn off on Doublehead Gap rd.

I think this tour bus must have taken a wrong turn somwhere. It had an Alaska tag on it.


Maybe the driver mistook the snow covered mountains of N Georgia for Denali
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Old 03-10-2010, 06:25 PM   #12
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Continueing on, the pavement ends. This is not a forest service road, just a dirt road past some farmland and old houses. There are also a few people with money who live along this road.



The house in the back ground looks like a castle. It also has a private lake and beach. Despite global warming, there are no girls in bikinis to take pics of today.



Eventually, its back to more pavement and then back to Ellijay. I stop at a bluff overlooking Wally World and take a few last pics. Here's one:



Then I load up the bike for the drive home:


I was glad to be able to relax for the last part of the trip home.



Total riding distance: 98.1 miles. Not a lot of miles but lots of fun. I almost didn't go riding today. I'm glad I didn't make that mistake
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Old 03-10-2010, 06:30 PM   #13
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Thanks for the RR...

BTW, how do you load your bike into the truck?
Ramp or Men-Power???
Just curious, because I want to have one in the near future...
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Old 03-11-2010, 07:04 AM   #14
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Thanks for the RR...

BTW, how do you load your bike into the truck?
Ramp or Men-Power???
Just curious, because I want to have one in the near future...
I have a 7 foot long folding ramp. I just push the bike up while walking alongside and then step up on to the tailgate. It's real easy with a light bike and a low bed which my S-10 has. If I'm loading my GS, which is a heavy pig, I either have someone help or use the engine to get up the ramp. I also have a 5 1/2 foot wooden ramp which works fine with the S-10. The advantage of the folding ramp is that it fits inside the truck. I prefer not leaving it in the bed. If I bring the wooden ramp I use a lock and cable to secure it but it wouldn't be too hard to steal.



If you are short or have a truck with a higher bed, this won't work. I use a step stool to get bikes up into my Avalanche.



I'm 6-2 so this works fine for me. If you are short and have a tall bed you may need to do something else like get a wide ATV ramp so you can walk up with the bike or ride up.

I used to be one of those people who rode everywhere and saw no reason to trailer a bike. My wife talked me into getting a truck so she could haul her bike if we were going a long distance. Before long I was using it to haul my bike. Now I have loaded and unloaded my bikes so often it only takes a couple of minutes to load or unload. It's so easy a caveman could do it
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Old 03-11-2010, 09:53 AM   #15
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I was at my cabin off of Doublehead Gap Sunday and was surprised at how much snow was still around...it was icy as hell off on Big Creek Road, especially where the sun never hits. Must have been LOTS of fun up Old Bucktown with slick tires.
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