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Old 03-26-2010, 07:48 PM   #16
ExTex
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I had a Shadow 500 and thought the engine was very good. At 8000 miles, it should be good for many years. The bike was a bit small for me and I am NOT a cruiser type of person, but as cruisers go, the 500 is one of the least-crusier styles. As stated, the coils go bad and the MC window clouds up. All in all, not a lot of problems for a 20 year old bike. I changed the buckhorn handlebars for Nighthawk 650 bars and improved the handling a lot.

At $900, it is a good buy.

Ride Safely,
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1983 Nighthawk 650
1989 Inteceptor VTR 250
1985 Sabre 700.......Sold
1983 Shadow 500.... sold
2006 Ninja 500........ sold
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Old 03-26-2010, 07:53 PM   #17
mikesova OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ExTex
I had a Shadow 500 and thought the engine was very good. At 8000 miles, it should be good for many years. The bike was a bit small for me and I am NOT a cruiser type of person, but as cruisers go, the 500 is one of the least-crusier styles. As stated, the coils go bad and the MC window clouds up. All in all, not a lot of problems for a 20 year old bike. I changed the buckhorn handlebars for Nighthawk 650 bars and improved the handling a lot.

At $900, it is a good buy.

Ride Safely,
Have any pics?
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Old 03-26-2010, 08:56 PM   #18
Rescue Wagon
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I had one as my first bike. The biggest complaint me and my wife had was the seat. It became painful to ride a long way on the factory one, so the first upgrade I would recommend is a new seat and ride the tires off of her.

Not that I'm proud of it, but I had no clue what proper maintenance was when I owned it and it ran forever. Lots of power and just fun to ride.

And lastly how can you go wrong with this bike for $950???????
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Old 03-27-2010, 03:35 PM   #19
ExTex
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikesova
Have any pics?
Sorry, no photos left around. The handlebar change went well.
All cables fit, but the master cylinder had more angle than I wanted.
I showed it to the Honda serviceman and he said it was ok, but I wanted to play... so I installed the MC from a Ninja 500. It has a lever distance setting. That worked well... I think the brakes worked better than original.

But, I had to fabricate a mirror holder (perch) since there was none on the Ninja MC. I bought a mount for a KLR650 and solved that problem.

The bike rode better and the brakes worked better than the original.
Sorry I don't have a picture.

Ride Safely,
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1983 Nighthawk 650
1989 Inteceptor VTR 250
1985 Sabre 700.......Sold
1983 Shadow 500.... sold
2006 Ninja 500........ sold
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Old 03-28-2010, 05:14 AM   #20
kraven
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You might go down to the dealer and survey what service parts will cost and if still available.
A lot of parts for the old 80's bikes are now non-available from H and there is no aftermarket to speak of making intake rubbers and such.
These are basically throwaway bikes at this point.
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Old 03-28-2010, 04:21 PM   #21
ExTex
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There are a lot of parts on Ebay. and www.oldbikebarn.com carries some.
Honda still makes a lot of parts. I bought new coils 2 years ago and I had to wait a week for the new coils to arrive from the factory.

Ride Safely,
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1983 Nighthawk 650
1989 Inteceptor VTR 250
1985 Sabre 700.......Sold
1983 Shadow 500.... sold
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Old 08-02-2010, 10:38 AM   #22
EngineeredDisaster
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hughlysses
It looks like a very nice bike, and that price sounds like a deal to me. My knowledge comes from my 1983 VT500FT Ascot, which is basically a "standard"/streetracker version of the same bike. The 500cc V-twin has decent power and a wide power band, and gets decent mileage. Wear parts like clutch plates, brake pads, oil filters, etc. are easy to get from Honda or aftermarket suppliers. Some Honda factory parts are starting to become unavailable, but you really shouldn't need much of that sort of thing unless you wreck the bike. You see a lot of these bikes parted out on ebay, which can be a good source for parts. Since many more Shadows were built than Ascots, used parts are more plentiful.

The main significant weak point with these bikes is the ignition coils. After ~27 years of baking in the heat above the engine, many of them break down. This manifests as a miss-fire at wide open throttle above 5000 RPM, or especially as difficulty cranking when hot. OEM coils are still available from Honda or aftermarket coils are available from Dyna (which require a little work to fit). If your bike ever exhibits these symptoms, buy new coils (don't waste your money on used ones).

Another thing to watch out for is the "power chamber" in the exhaust system. It's located between the header pipes and the mufflers, and is mounted under the frame in front of the rear wheel. It adds volume to the exhaust system to improve the exhaust tuning. The bottom of the chamber sometimes rusts out. An OEM replacement from Honda (IF available) costs over $400. The best fix is to take it to your local muffler shop and ask them to cut out any rotted sections and weld or braze in new metal.

We have an Ascot Group over on Yahoo, but there are quite a few Shadow riding members too. It's a good source of info for keeping these bikes running. Check it out at: http://autos.groups.yahoo.com/group/...00enthusiasts/
That sounds exactly like what mine is doing! What modifications do you need to do to fit the Dyna coils? Which coils did you buy? Also, what did you do for wires? It looks like you can't buy a new set of OEM wires anymore...
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Old 12-15-2013, 12:25 AM   #23
Hengky
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Vt 500

my vt 500 (especialy bout price) one of the most relaible motorbike .
I drag an old VT which is abandon 10 year ,from orphanage garage more than 4 year ago ,



and now may across 11436 Km . Dont push so much, Just love her

[IMG][/IMG]


[IMG][/IMG]
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Old 12-15-2013, 12:31 AM   #24
Hengky
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rescue Wagon View Post
I had one as my first bike. The biggest complaint me and my wife had was the seat. It became painful to ride a long way on the factory one, so the first upgrade I would recommend is a new seat and ride the tires off of her.

Not that I'm proud of it, but I had no clue what proper maintenance was when I owned it and it ran forever. Lots of power and just fun to ride.

And lastly how can you go wrong with this bike for $950???????
I aggre with you, existing seat really far to word "comfortable", than i modified to single seater, and much better now
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Old 12-15-2013, 05:58 AM   #25
brucifer
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Nice build Hengky. That thing looks sweet! I like the Harley primary cover grafted on. How did you secure it to the engine?
Do you have pics of the other side of the bike?
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Old 12-15-2013, 11:15 AM   #26
JerryH
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kraven View Post
You might go down to the dealer and survey what service parts will cost and if still available.
A lot of parts for the old 80's bikes are now non-available from H and there is no aftermarket to speak of making intake rubbers and such.
These are basically throwaway bikes at this point.
I have to totally agree with this. These were great bikes, light years ahead of any of the "cruiser" styled bikes Honda builds today. They were built back when bikes were meant to be ridden, not just looked at. It's to bad about the parts problem. But that's the way the Japanese do things. Build something for a short time, then drop it and replace it with something else, and after a few years, stop selling parts for it. It seems to be intentional, to prevent people from being able to repair and continue to ride older bikes. This was the William Edwards Deming way of doing things, and turned out to be very profitable for manufacturers.
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Old 12-15-2013, 06:52 PM   #27
Paebr332
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerryH View Post
I have to totally agree with this. These were great bikes, light years ahead of any of the "cruiser" styled bikes Honda builds today. They were built back when bikes were meant to be ridden, not just looked at. It's to bad about the parts problem. But that's the way the Japanese do things. Build something for a short time, then drop it and replace it with something else, and after a few years, stop selling parts for it. It seems to be intentional, to prevent people from being able to repair and continue to ride older bikes. This was the William Edwards Deming way of doing things, and turned out to be very profitable for manufacturers.
Deming never advocated planned obsolescence. He advocated continuous improvement of systems. Not one of his 14 points nor his Seven Deadly Diseases nor his 8 Lesser Category Obstacles had anything to do with what you seem to be alluding to.

Do you ever comment on a topic on which you have actual knowledge?
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Old 12-15-2013, 11:14 PM   #28
JerryH
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paebr332 View Post
Deming never advocated planned obsolescence. He advocated continuous improvement of systems. Not one of his 14 points nor his Seven Deadly Diseases nor his 8 Lesser Category Obstacles had anything to do with what you seem to be alluding to.

Do you ever comment on a topic on which you have actual knowledge?
Continuous improvement of systems would sure seem to be planned obsolescence. Do you know why Harley has such a huge aftermarket? Yes, part of it is definitely the popularity of the bikes. But the rest of it is because Harley does not make major changes every year (continuous improvement of systems) Unlike the Japanese, their designs stick around for awhile, making it profitable to build and sell parts and accessories that will fit many model years. With their "continuous improvement", Japanese bikes are here today, gone tomorrow. They don't stick around long enough to make an aftermarket profitable.

That 500 Shadow was a wonderful bike, and it would work just as well today as it did back then. But no, the Japanese could not leave well enough alone.

There are exceptions. I ride a 2002 version of a bike that was designed in 1985, and sold through 2006. The EXACT same bike, other than paint colors. It was a great bike in 1985, was still the same great bike in 2002, and remained the same great bike through 2006. It would still be a great bike if produced today. Change just for the sake of change is never a good thing. It makes what was new yesterday obsolete almost instantly. That's another reason why even in today's economy, Harleys hold their value way better than Japanese bikes. Some might think cheap Japanese bikes are a great deal, until they start looking for parts. Yes I've been there and done that. I sold (or pretty much gave away) several Japanese bikes because I could not get parts to keep them going. You can improvise some things, but that can only go so far.
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I won't spend more on a bike than I think it's worth, but if it's a good deal, I don't seem to have a problem buying bikes I don't need.
2002 Vulcan 750, 2013 Royal Enfield B5
2001 XT225, 2009 Genuine Stella
1980 Puch moped
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Old 12-16-2013, 07:48 AM   #29
Paebr332
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerryH View Post
Continuous improvement of systems would sure seem to be planned obsolescence. Do you know why Harley has such a huge aftermarket? Yes, part of it is definitely the popularity of the bikes. But the rest of it is because Harley does not make major changes every year (continuous improvement of systems) Unlike the Japanese, their designs stick around for awhile, making it profitable to build and sell parts and accessories that will fit many model years. With their "continuous improvement", Japanese bikes are here today, gone tomorrow. They don't stick around long enough to make an aftermarket profitable.
Deming dealt with the system of production. He spent his entire life preaching continuous improvement in quality and efficiency through the reduction of variation. It had NOTHING to do with planned obsolescence.

Don't try to dress your personal opinions in the clothes of people you obviously have never studied. Your use of Deming's full first name was a real clue to those of us who have studied the man and his teachings that you have done neither.
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Old 01-23-2014, 11:55 AM   #30
Hengky
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Image for bruu

Quote:
Originally Posted by brucifer View Post
Nice build Hengky. That thing looks sweet! I like the Harley primary cover grafted on. How did you secure it to the engine?
Do you have pics of the other side of the bike?




Hiii Bru, sorry so late to reply .
Yes, i have some detail to explain the left side.
maybe more easier to see if you click my youtube link on
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=APqiHbhw3Fs

here my email
sigmatrex@gmail.com , if you need more image .

thanks for your kindly comment bruu

Hengky screwed with this post 01-23-2014 at 12:12 PM
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