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Old 05-10-2010, 09:01 AM   #196
B.Curvin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by U 1 2 B ME
some advice from BMW Rider Training that i got:

1. Look there - go there.
2. NEVER use your front brake and your handle bars together.
3. A biker can never just - jump on and go. Suit up first - it should take longer than getting in a car.
4. IT IS BETTER TO SWEAT THAN TO BLEED!

Number 2 is very incorrect. Just depends on the situation. It's called trail braking.

Of course it's not the best idea for a new rider, but I'd hate for someone

to start out with false information. It's something to learn as you progress.

Preferably on a track.
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Old 05-10-2010, 09:51 PM   #197
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SVMango
Number 2 is very incorrect. Just depends on the situation. It's called trail braking.

Of course it's not the best idea for a new rider, but I'd hate for someone

to start out with false information. It's something to learn as you progress.

Preferably on a track.
I think it means not to use the front break if you have the bars turned well over, like in a slow street corner's etc.
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Old 05-11-2010, 04:33 PM   #198
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SVMango
Number 2 is very incorrect. Just depends on the situation. It's called trail braking.

Of course it's not the best idea for a new rider, but I'd hate for someone

to start out with false information. It's something to learn as you progress.

Preferably on a track.
And then LEAVE IT THERE. Want to risk crashing, then at the track is a good place for it. In the real world, with changing conditions, roadside obstacles, oncoming traffic, and indefiinite wait times for medical help, why use a technique that increases your chance of crashing?
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Old 05-12-2010, 01:20 AM   #199
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aussijussi
I think it means not to use the front break if you have the bars turned well over, like in a slow street corner's etc.

Most often than not, I use my front brakes(with the rear) when going around roundabouts. We have huge roundabouts here...so it's always fun going around these "re-routers" heading for the 3rd exit. If there are no vehicles around...I go for a-little-faster-than-usual manuever. I always use my front brake "at speeds" as long as my bars are not fully-turned in either direction. Even more dangerous when coming to a full stop(especially from a short throttle burst), hard front brake...handlebars not straightened. I'm comfy with these...if you're not...well
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Old 05-12-2010, 10:56 AM   #200
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Trailbraking is optimal with the rear brake only. Generally speaking, my rule of thumb is that the front brake should be used primarily when you are interested in actually stopping the bike, not just slowing down.
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Old 05-12-2010, 11:06 AM   #201
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Not meaning to cast stones or anything, but the title of this thread is 'Most Important Things to Know For a Motorcycling n00b'. Rather than, say, 'advanced track techniques for the semi-pro'.

Yes, I'm exaggerating. But a lot of the stuff being posted here are things I would never try to explain to an actual n00b. Crawl, walk, run.
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Old 05-12-2010, 11:10 AM   #202
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Read the thread title

Quote:
Originally Posted by memery26
Trailbraking is optimal with the rear brake only. Generally speaking, my rule of thumb is that the front brake should be used primarily when you are interested in actually stopping the bike, not just slowing down.
This thread is: "Most Important Things to Know For a Motorcycling n00b"

It is NOT a place for you to share your "rule of thumb" (which is bad advice)

Go get some professional training... It sounds like you need it.
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Old 05-12-2010, 04:52 PM   #203
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Agreed.. front brake is your friend!
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Old 05-13-2010, 06:26 AM   #204
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Quote:
Originally Posted by memery26
Trailbraking is optimal with the rear brake only. Generally speaking, my rule of thumb is that the front brake should be used primarily when you are interested in actually stopping the bike, not just slowing down.
This should be in the "Most Important Things for a Pirate to Know" thread.
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Old 05-13-2010, 07:26 AM   #205
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DAKEZ
This thread is: "Most Important Things to Know For a Motorcycling n00b"

It is NOT a place for you to share your "rule of thumb" (which is bad advice)

Go get some professional training... It sounds like you need it.
I've read the Code books, as well as Parks' book, in addition to both Plough books. While I agree with the overall point that trail braking is an advanced technique, I stand by my opinion that, especially for a new rider, the front brake should be totally avoided in any kind of cornering situation, and used prudently otherwise.

I've also taken the Total Control ARC I and II, and take riding very seriously. A sentiment I will not extend to your snarky post.

Edited: For the record, I use my front brake during straight line braking. As a noob, however, more prone to panicking, avoiding it in cornering situations is a pretty good idea.

memery26 screwed with this post 05-13-2010 at 08:14 AM
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Old 05-13-2010, 08:22 AM   #206
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Quote:
Originally Posted by memery26
I stand by my opinion that, especially for a new rider, the front brake should be totally avoided in any kind of cornering situation, and used prudently otherwise.
At least you are a little more clear now.
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DAKEZ screwed with this post 12-09-2013 at 10:18 AM
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Old 05-13-2010, 08:53 AM   #207
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I'm just going to add that this post has gotten confusing. Too much arguing over whether or not to use the front brakes and when. Although I know you're trying to help, I'd be confused as hell over parts of this.

Here's my advice. Do what your MSF instructor says to do for a few months. Then go see what all you can do with the brakes when you have a nice safe place to do so.
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Old 05-13-2010, 01:24 PM   #208
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Wonderful thread, I'll try to add something that's a shade different:

1. Remain alert and always keep your eyes moving -- the object that's going to hurt you is the one you didn't see coming (old boxer's axiom).

2. You're never as good as you think you are, so keep practicing the full range of skills (even the simple stuff).
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Old 05-14-2010, 06:56 AM   #209
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DAKEZ
This thread is: "Most Important Things to Know For a Motorcycling n00b"
Stopped being useful information for n00bs pages ago. Someone should (IMHO) un-pin it and let it die because it's now full of confused messages that a n00b will have more problems sorting out than if they'd not seen it at all.
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Old 05-15-2010, 12:43 PM   #210
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Awright.. let's un-hijack this thread.

n00bs... read "proficient motorcycling" by David Hough from cover-to-cover. Twice. Then read it again once a year.

Also, don't start looking into speed techniques too early. When I started, my dad got me a copy of "Total Control" by Lee Parks. This book is more about how to go fast around a track. In retrospect, I think I might have been better off not reading it, since it gets you in the mindset of going fast. Some of the info was indeed useful and helpful, but I think a n00b shouldn't even be thinking about going fast. The speed will come eventually, no need to rush into it.
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