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Old 05-19-2010, 02:46 PM   #211
daq7
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I kind of don't agree about not reading total control. I read it fairly early in my noobness, and I think it helped a lot in teaching proper cornering technique. And that is important to know if you accidentally go too hot into a corner. Anyway I found it useful.
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Old 05-21-2010, 02:57 AM   #212
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I was told years ago and I'm still here for it. "Ride as fast for as far as you can see"
And I don't mean go as fast as you can. If you can't see around a corner, slow down, keep to your side of the road and be ready for anything. One other thing is to ENJOY the ride and every ride
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Old 05-22-2010, 10:07 PM   #213
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Quote:
Originally Posted by memery26
Trailbraking is optimal with the rear brake only. Generally speaking, my rule of thumb is that the front brake should be used primarily when you are interested in actually stopping the bike, not just slowing down.
My first real bike was a 1972 Honda CB350 twin with drum brakes at both ends. Everyone warned me that if I used the front brake at all I would go flying over the handlebars, burst into flames midair and shatter into atoms when I hit the ground.... lovely for any spectators, but very painful for me.

Thank God I was an avid reader of Cycle World and Motorcyclist! I had been devouring anything I could get my hands on about riding and I knew that the front brake was a good thing to use.

The first thing I did to the old Honda was get the frozen up front drum working and adjusted. Next thing was to test it out gingerly at first and quickly working up to full force, white knuckly squeezing till the cable breaks braking. (if you've ever ridden a bike with cable actuated, double leading shoe drums then you must truly understand just what braking awesomeness is!). Between that and whacking off (hey, I was 15 and had found my brother's girly magazine stash!) I had the largest right forearm of any kid at my school!

Yeah man, I aint skeerd of no front brakes! Hammer them sumbitches everytime I ride! Damn Straight!

Really!

Oh yeah.... Dirt/loose/wet surface the rear gets more bias depending on how poor the traction. Clean, dry street I use just enough rear to keep the bike from doing a total nosedive..... and the front to settle the suspension through the turns....

The same duality that exists in the modern mullet can also be found in the front brake of a modern motorcycle. The mullet, with it's sensible, business like frontal presentation quickly reveals the true, party animal nature of it's owner when viewed from any other angle. Front brakes duality are of a slightly more progressive nature. It is revealed when the user graduates from a gentle caress of the lever onto a more Neanderthal like "choke the living shit outa' it" squeeze which quickly turns their Hyabusa into something more like a luge. In summary, don't be a mullet headed Neanderthal and just grab a big meaty handful of the darn front brake! The things are made to slow you down from speed that would make Apollo 11 look slow, go easy on them and you'll be fine!

So there's MY contribution to the nOOb thread!
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Old 05-24-2010, 03:37 PM   #214
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Something for noobs to at least be aware of, whether they practice it or not:

When approaching a 4-way intersection, you generally maximize the likelihood that you will be seen by someone about to turn left in front of you if you stay as far to the right as possible. There are two reasons for this.

First, you can potentially see them, and they can potentially see you, sooner, and therefore longer, before you enter the intersection. This comes into play when there is a car going in the same direction as you and ahead of you, and waiting to turn left and blocking your view. If you are in the lane next to them (on their immediate right), oncoming traffic turning left in front of you may not see you until you are passing the car turning left in the lane right next to you. However, if you are say 2 or 3 lanes to the right of the car turning left (the one going the same direction as you), then you will see oncoming left-turning traffic sooner.

Second, the farther away (left or right) from the oncoming left-turning traffic you are, the closer you get to that lateral movement that other drivers notice more easily.

Just keep in mind that a lot of strip malls etc. are at intersection quadrants, ie. the four corners of the intersections. If you are in the right lane, be aware that someone may be waiting to turn into traffic from a parking lot to go the same direction as you. To avoid that issue, try to keep the lane to your immediate left available as you approach an intersection.

Hopefully this makes sense to everyone.
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Old 05-24-2010, 04:26 PM   #215
danman
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Simple stuff helped me most starting out (some of this may have already been covered);

Headlight on high beam all the time during the day.
Letting off the gas solves most of your problems.
Don't ride in the middle of the road where all the oil/transmisson fluid is.
Watch the road surface for loose rocks, wet grass and leaves, sand, oil residue and transmission fluid, cow manure, road kill, especially in turns.
Eyes on the road, not the controls/instruments, or her tight ass.
Watch where where you put your foot down at a stop light, you could slip and fall over.
Don't get chain lube all over your rear tire.
Ride staggered formation when riding with other riders.
Don't ride in a cars blind spot and don't stay there.
Assume they don't see you, cause they don't.
Do a 'pre-flight' check of the bike before riding off.
Don't overload the bike.
Rear brake first, then front brake (IMHO), till you get the hang of braking.
Practice braking, including practice 'panic' stopping, do it in an empty parking lot. Do it a hundred times.
Slow down on wet road.
Downshift as your speed slows, as when coming to a stop sign. Don't stop then downshift. Always be in proper gear, in case you have to go quickly to avoid a situation.
No shirt, no shoes, no eye protection? No riding.
Its not like driving a car, it's like flying a plane!
And, relax........
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Old 05-24-2010, 05:32 PM   #216
DAKEZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danman
Simple stuff helped me most starting out (some of this may have already been covered);

Headlight on high beam all the time during the day.
Letting off the gas solves most of your problems.
Don't ride in the middle of the road where all the oil/transmisson fluid is.
Watch the road surface for loose rocks, wet grass and leaves, sand, oil residue and transmission fluid, cow manure, road kill, especially in turns.
Eyes on the road, not the controls/instruments, or her tight ass.
Watch where you put your foot down at a stop light, you could slip and fall over.
Don't get chain lube all over your rear tire.
Ride staggered formation when riding with other riders.
Don't ride in a cars blind spot and don't stay there.
Assume they don't see you, cause they don't.
Do a 'pre-flight' check of the bike before riding off.
Don't overload the bike.
Rear brake first, then front brake (IMHO), till you get the hang of braking.
Practice braking, including practice 'panic' stopping, do it in an empty parking lot. Do it a hundred times.
Slow down on wet road.
Downshift as your speed slows, as when coming to a stop sign. Don't stop then downshift. Always be in proper gear, in case you have to go quickly to avoid a situation.
No shirt, no shoes, no eye protection? No riding.
Its not like driving a car, it's like flying a plane!
And, relax........
..............................................
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Old 05-24-2010, 05:33 PM   #217
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danman
Letting off the gas solves most of your problems.


Maybe if your bike is on fire...
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Old 05-24-2010, 07:10 PM   #218
duck
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danman
Headlight on high beam all the time during the day.
I'd recommend not doing this is you have a decent headlight. I used to but stopped after the popo told me not to a couple of times.
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Old 05-25-2010, 01:05 AM   #219
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"Until you've made eye contact assume they haven't seen you"

The very first lesson my instructor taught me
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Old 05-25-2010, 02:17 PM   #220
msport
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Quote:
Originally Posted by duck
I'd recommend not doing this is you have a decent headlight. I used to but stopped after the popo told me not to a couple of times.
in which state did the popo tell you not to run your high beam during the day? it is legal in Washington state, and was recommended by my msf instructor.

I installed and use a pair of hella fogs during day for extra lighting, vs using the high beam. my reasoning is that fog lights have a much wider dispersion of light so they look bright from all angles in front of the bike not just where your headlight is aimed. makes for a better chance for cages to see you. also, 3 lights are suppose to be better for other drivers to determine your speed on approach (all trains now have 3 lights so drivers/pedestrians can tell approach speed quicker.) I suppose you could argue that on a bike it would be pretty hard to get the lights far enough apart to help. but at any rate, the extra lights can't hurt.
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Old 05-25-2010, 07:28 PM   #221
duck
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Quote:
Originally Posted by msport
in which state did the popo tell you not to run your high beam during the day? it is legal in Washington state, and was recommended by my msf instructor.
I don't know if it's legal or not but twice was told by the SPD (Seattle Police) not to do it. Legal or not, I avoid doing things that irk LEOs and I sure as heck am not going to start an argument with one.
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Old 05-25-2010, 07:33 PM   #222
duck
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Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalcaptive
"Until you've made eye contact assume they haven't seen you"

The very first lesson my instructor taught me
This is BAD advice. When someone points their eyes in your direction and you ASSUME you've made eye contact you have no idea if your presence has actually registered in their gray matter. A better instructor would have told you to always assume you're invisible.
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Old 05-25-2010, 07:51 PM   #223
DAKEZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalcaptive
"Until you've made eye contact assume they haven't seen you"

The very first lesson my instructor taught me
Quote:
Originally Posted by DAKEZ
Good post but the "make eye contact" part is extremely bad advice.

The faceplant forum is littered with riders who said they made eye contact.

It is the classic. Looked but failed to see.

Here is a link to one from just this past week: http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=568430

"...She looked right at me , made eye contact, and proceeded right into my path."

DO NOT LOOK AT THEIR EYES!!!

LOOK AT THE TOP OF THE FRONT TIRE. / (wheel)
Hope this helps you lose the bad advice taught you by your instructor.
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Old 05-26-2010, 11:13 AM   #224
45LC
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Quote:
Headlight on high beam all the time during the day.
I'd really prefer other riders didn't do this. I see it alot around here and it's not safe at all.
It just blinds oncoming motorcycle riders and generally pisses off people in cars.SPD included I'm sure, those Silverstar bulbs are freakishly bright.

Back on topic..As for stuff I wish someone told me about bikes.

Thre simple adjustments that make all the difference in the world with handling.

#1 Tire pressure. I always followed the psi molded into the tire. Wrong, try different pressures for different conditons front and rear and note the difference.
#2 Suspesnion settings. Again middle is just a starting point. Spring preload, rebound and dampening all have profound affects on handling.
#3 Chain tension. Often overlooked or simply neglected. At least on my dual sports it affects shifting and drivetrain noise.

Something I often struggled with when I first rode on pavement was stopping in gear and searching in vain for neutral.
1st,3rd,1st,3rd on and on. Figured out the rolling "N" click pretty quick but nobody ever told me to do it, learned the "hard way".
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Old 05-26-2010, 11:45 AM   #225
dwoodward
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 45LC
Something I often struggled with when I first rode on pavement was stopping in gear and searching in vain for neutral.
1st,3rd,1st,3rd on and on.
*BLINK* 1st... 3rd? Really?

Quote:
Figured out the rolling "N" click pretty quick but nobody ever told me to do it, learned the "hard way".
Hint- why might you want to stay in gear while stopped in traffic? here, let's try something.

Close your eyes, picture yourself sitting at a stop light. Now imagine behind you the

SCRRREEEEEEEEEEECH


of car tires, locked up and not stopping. Betcha wish you were in gear...
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