ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Riding > The perfect line and other riding myths
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 06-16-2010, 07:08 AM   #256
jbmac
Mitten Man
 
jbmac's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2010
Location: Central Michigan - LP
Oddometer: 127
Still New

I am still new to riding (<1 year) and all of the advice in here is great, but most I heard or read before I started. The one thing I would stress, espeicially is high traffic areas, is to watch your rear well.

I have actually had the most close calls with other riders passing me in my lane almost clipping me while in bumper to bumper traffic. Also, in that traffic cars like to press up on your rear. It is a constant struggle to maintain your distance with the car in front of you, while hoping the car behind you doesn't lose focus.

No lane sharing or splitting allowed here, just impatient and unsafe riders.
__________________
I don't know with what weapons World War III will be fought, but World War IV will be fought with sticks and stones. - Albert Einstein

Mid-Michigan Tag-o-rama
jbmac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-2010, 11:44 AM   #257
daq7
Studly Adventurer
 
daq7's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2009
Location: Denver Colorado Area
Oddometer: 571
It's interesting, but I really don't get tail gated very much here on the motorbike. It is pretty rare that someone follows close enough to annoy me.
daq7 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2010, 06:56 PM   #258
4D GRIT
Adventurer
 
4D GRIT's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2009
Location: shevegas, WI
Oddometer: 42
In a crash he with the most lug nuts wins!
Dress for the crash!
__________________
Peas and Carrots..........
4D GRIT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2010, 07:42 PM   #259
Yakima
Whee! Wee Strom
 
Yakima's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2010
Location: Central Washington State
Oddometer: 309
As a middle aged Old Fart noob, here's what I wish someone had told me:
1. make sure you can plant both feet flat on the ground. I can't with my free to me vintage bike. So that's been interesting...
2. make a list of all the stuff you want to put on before riding off, and make the list in order. I've had to take off the gloves, then put on the helmet, then put on the gloves and then take them and the helmet off to put in the ear protection, etc. etc.
Until it's automatic, I need the list...
No one told me how long and complicated ATGATT can be. Worth it, but long and complicated.
Yakima is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2010, 10:48 PM   #260
Plaka
Brevis illi vita est
 
Joined: Jun 2010
Oddometer: 4,581
Quote:
Originally Posted by DAKEZ
Completely unnecessary. Why do you feel the need to plant both feet flat?
Because it's a lot more stable. Handy if you're being slapped around in the wind---like on a suddenly sandy shoulder with fast semi's zooming pat. It's also nice to be able to change which foot you pick up without having to do the bunny hop and lean the bike the other way---valuable in cities with a lot of steep uphill intersections---San Francisco and Cincinnati are cities I've ridden that come to mind. It's also invaluable on a fully loaded bike near the end of a long day when you are fatigued. On my old bike I typically came to a full stop and then put down whichever foot I chose. On starting again I picked up one or both feet and had them settled on the pegs before I started moving----and then took off in a perfectly strait line. But I'd been riding that bike for 20+ years. Lot of practice. With only two years on the new bike, which is much heavier with vastly different handling geometry I often skim into a stop with both feet down...and take off the same way. I'm only just getting where I can do a 180 degree turn at full lock. It's like being a noob again. Nice to be able to put both feet down. But it you can't you can't and have to learn to ride with the inseam the Lord give ya...

Plaka screwed with this post 06-20-2010 at 11:12 PM
Plaka is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2010, 11:34 PM   #261
Plaka
Brevis illi vita est
 
Joined: Jun 2010
Oddometer: 4,581
If you are going to do the cruiser/profile you need to ride in a feet forward position. I rode a Harley around the block once (including some RR tracks) and found the position miserable. But some people are into this and I don't need to dis them over it. I figure they are as entitled to their thing as much as I am to mine. Very rarely there will be a filling station wisecrack. I simply offer to race---first one over the George Washington bridge wins. 1,668 miles and I can do it in 4 and a half tanks and two days if I want to be miserable about it. End of discussion.

I have a 35" inseam or so in street wear. The most common inseam I see in mens pants in a store is 34 followed by 36. I think I'm pretty average.

I've had one (exactly) look-mommy-that-man-dropped-his-motorcycle incident in a filling station late at night, heavily loaded, hypothermic, fatigued and doing my just-put-one-foot-down-when-stopping-'cause-it-looks-cool number. I learned. I Dropped the new K bike when pulling out into the street, being surprised by traffic from behind a parked truck, hitting the brakes and stopping with my foot exactly high centered over the gutter---too far down. I learned to skim it with both feet down and don't plan on stopping high centered. So if advising a newbie I would say that if you can get into a bike, one way or another, that is either very light (dirt bike) or that allows you to plant both feet (with some weight on it), go for it.
Plaka is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2010, 11:59 PM   #262
zDollar Bill
Eat, Sleep, Ride, Repeat
 
zDollar Bill's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Location: Miles away from Normal...
Oddometer: 969
I didn't read all the posts, so I'm not sure if this is a 205. I tell the n00b's to ride with their thumb on the horn button for a month. So in the future, just by reaction, the thumb will already be there waiting to sound the horn. I do it instantly when there is a car nearby. Good Luck out there, ride safe.
zDollar Bill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2010, 12:30 AM   #263
Plaka
Brevis illi vita est
 
Joined: Jun 2010
Oddometer: 4,581
When I first started to ride I did most things---if not exactly wrong---then oddly. I didn't so much want to get into riding bikes as I wanted to have a particular adventure and a motorcycle was in the middle of that so I figured I needed to get one and learn how to ride it. And it needed to be big enough to tour on because I had little time and less money. So I ended up with a reasonable sized but very powerful, fast and difficult to control bike. I rode it around and around in circles (with a sprocket change) on a nearby dirt lot. When I could avoid the brush piles I figured I was ready for the street.

I had a number of friends who rode so there was no end of advice, good and bad (Quite bad). Some of the good advice:

1) Never underestimate how cold it can get on a motorcycle.

Since then I have added:

1a)Always carry a rain jacket to put on over your riding coat and stuff with newspapers when you underestimate how cold it can get on a motorcycle.

1b)Have a nice sheepskin seat pad because it's comfy and you can stuff it under your jacket when you underestimate how cold it can get on a motorcycle.

2) If you think about crashing too much, you won't have any fun.

I've added to that:

2a) If you don't think about crashing enough you won't have any fun---eventually.

3) Drink a liter of water per tank of gas (when touring), including in the cold and especially rain.

I modified to:

3a) Piss a half liter or better per tank of gas, more in the heat, and your hydration will likely stay OK. Very dark piss means drink more.

4) Scan intersections clockwise (USA), first to the left, then center, then right. Then repeat. Always.

5) They can't hit you if they can't get close to you (picked up in a special driver ed class after some heinous offense on that first bike)

I'll add a couple of my own:

6) don't let visibility gear and/or armor make you think you are safer. Everyone out there, including other bikers, will fail to see stop signs, red lights or your vest. You are 100% responsible, for seeing, and avoiding, them. Your armor can help in an accident, (A LOT) but you still ain't bulletproof and if putting on armor makes you feel more confident to get rowdy and over-ride your skills or the conditions, you are defeating the armor. This one is subtle. I adjust the amount armor I wear to the ride I am contemplating. I always wear a minimum. I hit the visibility gear is rare circumstances (twilight commutes, some rain.). More often if I feel I need it I just get off the road. Opinions vary greatly.

7) Keep your riding gear well organized. If the bike is in the garage then there is a shelf in the garage with your helmet, helmet liners, gloves, spare shields, boots, a hook to hang the rainsuit to dry, pressure gauge and wipey rag for the dipstick or sightglass, etc. You need to maximize the convenience of wearing the minimum gear, every ride. After you get some accident free miles you start to get complacent. "It's just a couple of blocked to the 7-11, I don't wanna dig the helmet out of the closet...". Deadly thinking. If it is very easy to do, you will do it. Post a little sign on the shelf: "What do I want to crash in today?". Large or small, that crash WILL happen. But keeping that thought in mind gets increasingly difficult as you rack up crash free miles.
Plaka is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2010, 03:52 AM   #264
PeterW
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Nov 2005
Location: Gold Coast
Oddometer: 2,563
It's amazing what you can survive just trying not to die one second at a time.

Pete
PeterW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2010, 06:29 PM   #265
RiDR
The Himalayan what?
 
RiDR's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2007
Location: 45.55397,-78.59676
Oddometer: 592
Quote:
Originally Posted by zDollar Bill
I didn't read all the posts, so I'm not sure if this is a 205. I tell the n00b's to ride with their thumb on the horn button for a month. So in the future, just by reaction, the thumb will already be there waiting to sound the horn. I do it instantly when there is a car nearby. Good Luck out there, ride safe.
Seriously?
RiDR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2010, 07:54 PM   #266
Kingsqueak
Wannabe
 
Kingsqueak's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2005
Location: Monmouth County, NJ
Oddometer: 820
I don't want my last words to be "mmmeeeeeppppppp". A horn isn't worth anything if they don't know you are there.

It's useful for "Hey wake up, the light is green!" That's about it.
__________________
2008 TE610 - "Jumpy"
2001 KLR650 - retired "Lumpy"
1987 Honda Saber - destroyed "Crashy"
Kingsqueak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2010, 08:22 PM   #267
kase
Rider
 
Joined: Jun 2010
Location: Toronto, Canada
Oddometer: 5
Know your limits

When you begin telling yourself that you can "make it there" and really start counting the kilometers left before your destination, stop. Look for the first *safe* place to pull over and (weather permitting) lay down for 15 - 20 minutes. Or duck into a rest stop, out of the cold/rain... That time will revitalize you and allow you to complete your ride with a clear head (focusing on the road vs. the odometer).

Also, when you get a new bike, treat it with respect - especially if it's a big jump up in the cc range. Learn it before you "see what it can really do". There'll be plenty of time to open it up or ride 2-up, but do yourself (and your prospective pillion) a favor and clock a few hundred km on it first.

And speaking of passengers, understand that taking one is like wearing a 160 pound backpack. The bike will handle differently. They should follow the same rules as you - proper gear and no drinking.
kase is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2010, 11:16 PM   #268
bubby-joe
Adventurer
 
Joined: Oct 2009
Location: Way Up North
Oddometer: 13
Best advice I could donate to this post is take an acredited collision avoidance coarse. Military sent me for mine when I was in Europe in 1972 and it saved a lot of burnt skin and a couple of lives including mine. Also you control your own fate stay alert stay alive. Riding since 1965 and I'm still alive 43 road bikes to date. I've pushed the envelope and put a coulple down while racing in the late 60's. A bird took one out, it felt like hours before I could breath. Pick your bike to your body size both feet on the ground. A friends GS1150 scares hell out of me, my inseam is 30 inch 3 inches short of the ground on either side. I'll stay with my 1980 R-65 it corners better than most other Beemers anyhow and both feet flat on the ground, yes there is scrapes under the valve covers, both sides. I didn't buy it to polish it but to ride it. English slow speed trials competition was another very good experience great low speed control even at now 60+

bubby-joe screwed with this post 06-22-2010 at 01:19 AM
bubby-joe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-23-2010, 06:23 PM   #269
Benjamin M
Back to Mono
 
Benjamin M's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2009
Location: Surrey, UK
Oddometer: 56
Looking is something that you do.
__________________

Benjamin M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-23-2010, 06:46 PM   #270
tigerboy
Tight as a Tiger
 
tigerboy's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2002
Location: West Virginia
Oddometer: 112
I prefer to flat foot my bike.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Plaka
I have a 35" inseam or so in street wear. The most common inseam I see in mens pants in a store is 34 followed by 36. I think I'm pretty average.

I've had one (exactly) look-mommy-that-man-dropped-his-motorcycle incident in a filling station late at night, heavily loaded, hypothermic, fatigued and doing my just-put-one-foot-down-when-stopping-'cause-it-looks-cool number. I learned. I Dropped the new K bike when pulling out into the street, being surprised by traffic from behind a parked truck, hitting the brakes and stopping with my foot exactly high centered over the gutter---too far down. I learned to skim it with both feet down and don't plan on stopping high centered. So if advising a newbie I would say that if you can get into a bike, one way or another, that is either very light (dirt bike) or that allows you to plant both feet (with some weight on it), go for it.
I agree with most of this except the most common inseam being about 35". That's like saying the average guy is over 6 ft. Maybe in Holland or Germany that's true but not in the USA. Few men under 6ft have an inseam of 35".

Being able to plant both feet solid and flat just makes riding more convenient. Like this morning, someone took over the parking spot next to me, so i couldn't U-turn out, i had to back the bike out by paddling with my feet. Hard to do if you can't flat foot the bike.

Also, riding in lots of city traffic that way gets OLD. When I have to stop frequently, it's nice to be able to stand up, stretch, and get the pressure off my junk. Ideally I would like to be able to straddle the bike with an inch or two to spare but with a 32" inseam, this is hard to do with most modern non-cruiser bikes.

My Triumph Tiger was too much bike and I'm not Tiger-sized (I figure it works best for guys 6ft or more), I love my Baghira way more, it's lighter and I can flat foot it. I only use the Tiger if my ride involves lots of super slab.

So yes, I think a beginner should be able to flat foot their bike if possible, giving them one less ball to juggle.
__________________
'01 MZ Baghira Motard

Tigerboy.com
tigerboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 07:02 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014