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Old 09-12-2010, 06:45 AM   #406
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GreenGene
Now, it seems the easiest. No "stop and go", good field of view, everyone is going relatively the same speed, road conditions are more maintained.
One slight modification would be to note that this is "rural interstates". The urban interstates are a combat zone full of well-armed crazies. IMHO.
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Old 09-13-2010, 01:06 AM   #407
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Fight your fear and lean the bike.


The most appropriate advice for a noob would be to slow down and take a curve at a comfortable speed within his skill...but if something wrong happens, if you think that you won't make it...in an emergency situation I mean...instead of grabbing the brakes hard, just lean it more.

The worst case scenario will be a lowside (unlikely, the bike can lean way more than a noob can think) but it's way better than going straight and crushing yourself against the guard rail or this tree up there.
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Old 09-13-2010, 01:11 AM   #408
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Migs
-When you check your oil, check your coolant level too.
Coolant...what?!


Huh...maybe it's because I ride a Buell.
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Old 09-13-2010, 03:21 AM   #409
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SgtDuster
Fight your fear and lean the bike.
Bernt Spiegel makes this point in the very recommended The Upper Half of the Motorcycle, which is now available in English.

He says that humans (just like dogs and horses) are naturally comfortable with a lean angle up to 20 degrees - which is what is usually possible in nature. So as a riding noob, you'll reach those 20 degrees pretty quick on a bike, everything more takes practice.

Spiegel says that if you think you can't make it, don't touch the brakes and yell LEAN, LEAN, LEAN to yourself.
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Old 09-13-2010, 07:55 AM   #410
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Yes, the very old hurt report claims that freeways are safer than either cities or rural roads. I believe it claimed rural roads were the most dangerous statistically. But the report is decades old.
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Old 09-15-2010, 07:41 PM   #411
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff_CA
Spend money on your safety, your comfort then farkles. In that order.
Good point. I bought a helment before a ride - a couple of my friends laughed at me for that, but I didn't care.

I actually took a course and rented a few bikes before buying my first. By the time I got my first ride I had experience on over ten different bikes (on the course and on friends bikes). Not only was it easier to pick a bike, the experience of how different bikes behave was invaluable. Anyone with two or more bikes will be able to tell you a time when they got off one, onto the other and almost lost it when they shouldn't have. I guess a comparison for this is to play tennis for half an hour and then try badminton...
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Old 09-17-2010, 07:11 AM   #412
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Freeways are statistically safer.

But when shit hits the fan on the freeway, you usually end up dead.
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Old 09-17-2010, 10:07 AM   #413
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DevilNinjaDog
Freeways are statistically safer.

But when shit hits the fan on the freeway, you usually end up dead.
Kinda like a plane
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Old 09-18-2010, 07:46 PM   #414
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Quote:
Originally Posted by daq7
Uhm, when you ride in the winter, recognize that it simply is NOT possible to stay warm for long without electric gear. No matter how bundled you are, you are likely to find your range pretty short when the temperature gets in the low 20s.
Beware of putting yourself in a situation where you are absolutely 'depending' on the electric gear. A guy in an IronButt competition when to Alaska on one of runs and developed an electrical problem way out in the middle of nowhere. He had intended to 'pack light and travel fast', and nearly died from Hypothermia. The electrics are totally great, but just dont hang it out there too far in case of a problem... -MURPHY LIVES !!!
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Old 09-18-2010, 10:00 PM   #415
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Not having to rely on electrical gear to survive is totally obvious. But if you do no have it and things get to cold you need to ride slow, stop alot, or just stop.
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Old 09-22-2010, 09:50 AM   #416
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Noob advice, thread getting too long.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Flood
Bernt Spiegel makes this point in the very recommended The Upper Half of the Motorcycle, which is now available in English.

He says that humans (just like dogs and horses) are naturally comfortable with a lean angle up to 20 degrees - which is what is usually possible in nature. So as a riding noob, you'll reach those 20 degrees pretty quick on a bike, everything more takes practice.

Spiegel says that if you think you can't make it, don't touch the brakes and yell LEAN, LEAN, LEAN to yourself.
20° ? Man, I don't think this guy gets past 5° before he bins it:

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=619632

(Watch the first video of this thread to see that).

But you're right. What I definitely notice, at higher lean angles, is that it feels like I'm going to lose my balance and fall over. When you have to do that LEAN, LEAN, LEAN thing, it happens FAST. Not gradual. This sudden change is enough to set some people off balance. I guess the key is to find a decreasing radius turn (I know a couple good ones in WV) and PRACTISE, keeping your head up in the curve, so it doesn't feel scary and that you're going to go down, rather it will feel like a roller coaster as you ride through.

Smooth is key. All the fast guys I notice are smooth. All the slow guys are not. This is easy to see in other people's riding. And you notice it yourself. When you nail something fast, first thing you notice, is that you were SMOOTH. ONE steering input in the curve, whoosh and you get on the throttle as soon as you hit that apex and not dreadfully later.
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Old 09-22-2010, 10:32 AM   #417
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tigerboy
But you're right. What I definitely notice, at higher lean angles, is that it feels like I'm going to lose my balance and fall over.
You WON'T fall over on a speeding bike by leaning it. Stop worrying about that, fight this fear if you want to stay alive.
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Old 09-24-2010, 07:42 AM   #418
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from Bellegoed, Bellegem, Europe

There was one think that took years for me to know.

I always thought there was "one perfect line for driving".

That was complete false.

When you are on a circuit and as technical interested as most man-riders are, there is a perfect line to get the best times.

But NOT on the road. In England there seems to be a special book and they mention it far better:

When riding on normal roads, you cannot know what is coming up and the perfect line then is NOT the perfect technical line, but the line on which you see most of all for your security.

Eg.: when going to the left, it is possible that you stay longer at the right side of your driving side, because you are still counting whether the outer right end side of the road that you can see through the middlecenter of the road is going faster (road gets straighter again) or slower (road gets tougher turn).

Eg.: You can have the same situation with a narrow road on the right. Then you will change and go more to the left for also seeing whether someone can come out of the right so leaving this perfect line and changing it into a very flexible and sometimes very weird line. Because every moment you will chose the maximum of information and sight, and NOT the perfect riding line at that time.

That's also what makes driving in reality and even on unknown roads to an adventure every time again.

So it toulk me very long (I even am giving driving lessons myself and did not know this, but felt it all the time correct, oftenly making me drive slowier than others hard trained men) to realise this.

I apology for my poor knowledge of the language of Shakespeare. Our second language is Dutch (our dialect is Flemish and much more beautiful), our second French, our third English, our fourth German, our fifth Spanish and our sixth Italian with a lot of confusion of course...

The Kawasaki, Harley and Honda languages are also beautiful, of course.
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Old 09-24-2010, 02:15 PM   #419
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VAN BELLE Jean Marc
There was one think that took years for me to know.

I always thought there was "one perfect line for driving".

That was complete false.

When you are on a circuit and as technical interested as most man-riders are, there is a perfect line to get the best times.

But NOT on the road. In England there seems to be a special book and they mention it far better:

When riding on normal roads, you cannot know what is coming up and the perfect line then is NOT the perfect technical line, but the line on which you see most of all for your security.

Eg.: when going to the left, it is possible that you stay longer at the right side of your driving side, because you are still counting whether the outer right end side of the road that you can see through the middlecenter of the road is going faster (road gets straighter again) or slower (road gets tougher turn).

Eg.: You can have the same situation with a narrow road on the right. Then you will change and go more to the left for also seeing whether someone can come out of the right so leaving this perfect line and changing it into a very flexible and sometimes very weird line. Because every moment you will chose the maximum of information and sight, and NOT the perfect riding line at that time.

That's also what makes driving in reality and even on unknown roads to an adventure every time again.

So it toulk me very long (I even am giving driving lessons myself and did not know this, but felt it all the time correct, oftenly making me drive slowier than others hard trained men) to realise this.

I apology for my poor knowledge of the language of Shakespeare. Our second language is Dutch (our dialect is Flemish and much more beautiful), our second French, our third English, our fourth German, our fifth Spanish and our sixth Italian with a lot of confusion of course...

The Kawasaki, Harley and Honda languages are also beautiful, of course.
Are you Jean-Claude Van Damme's nephew or something?!


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Old 09-27-2010, 03:48 PM   #420
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MotoMusicMark
I'm doing some research on what would be more helpful to know at a person’s start in motorcycling versus learning it over years in the "school of hard knocks".

Things like..."Don't transport a bike on the centerstand. It might break the frame". or "Standing up on the pegs or at least putting more pressure on them makes the bike less top heavy and better to control at low speed".

Could you help my research by answering the following question...”What did you wish someone told you about motorcycling when you first started out?”

Thanks. Mark Tillack
Brinkhaven, OH(USA)
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