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Old 02-08-2011, 01:18 PM   #496
Meriden
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What my grandfather told me forty years ago when I started riding...

"There are only two kinds of riders. Those that have crashed and those that will. As long as you keep riding you are in the group that will."
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Y'all go ahead. I'll catch up to you at the crash site.
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Old 02-08-2011, 01:25 PM   #497
DAKEZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Meriden View Post
What my grandfather told me forty years ago when I started riding...

"There are only two kinds of riders. Those that have crashed and those that will. As long as you keep riding you are in the group that will."
Myth.

I am sure Gramps meant well (as with all the rest who say this) but every poll I have ever seen has around 60% never crashing.
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Old 02-08-2011, 01:41 PM   #498
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DAKEZ View Post
Myth.
Advice

Cool grandpa. He understood how it worked.
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Y'all go ahead. I'll catch up to you at the crash site.

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Old 02-09-2011, 07:06 AM   #499
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Several years ago I began a paper for my wife titled “Beginner’s Guide to Motorcycle Survival”

I began by asking several of my motorcycle friends who have ridden 20+ years to sum up there addidtude and perspective on riding… Their quotes became the opening bullets from the paper.

Hope this helps

  • “No matter how long you have been riding or how good you are once every 40,000 miles or so “You will be humbled…” Michael Bloom
  • “Expect the worst and you will not be surprised” Kevin Long
  • “You never realize how good you gear is until you need to use it” Simon Begler (some time after Tour of California incident on 405 Freeway)

“Suspend all belief in this reality… for the most improbable will most likely happen… causing the greatest amount of damage” Stefan Yencha

Cheers!
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Old 02-09-2011, 11:17 AM   #500
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DAKEZ View Post
Myth.


Quote:
I am sure Gramps meant well (as with all the rest who say this) but every poll I have ever seen has around 60% never crashing.
"those that will" is certainly not to be taken as an excuse to give up and think "Well, this must be my time to crash".

Unless he's talking about riding off-road; then I'm on Gramps' side.
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Old 02-09-2011, 03:59 PM   #501
Brooklyn Rob
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MotoMusicMark View Post
I'm doing some research on what would be more helpful to know at a person’s start in motorcycling versus learning it over years in the "school of hard knocks".

Things like..."Don't transport a bike on the centerstand. It might break the frame". or "Standing up on the pegs or at least putting more pressure on them makes the bike less top heavy and better to control at low speed".

Could you help my research by answering the following question...”What did you wish someone told you about motorcycling when you first started out?”

Thanks. Mark Tillack
Brinkhaven, OH(USA)
This is what l wish someone had told me:

1. wear earplugs

2. don't waste your money on a used bike

3. don't take your bike to King Cycles, in Brooklyn, N.Y. for work

4. helmets should be comfortably snug

The rest is just practice, Baby !!!
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Old 02-09-2011, 06:26 PM   #502
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brooklyn Rob View Post
2. don't waste your money on a used lemon
Fixt.

Used bikes are great for a first bike. Beginning riders are, for obvious reasons, more likely to drop or crash their bikes. If you start on a used bike and you drop it both the emotional and monetary scars cut less deeply.
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Old 02-11-2011, 10:11 AM   #503
firstr8
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Took me a while to get thru this thread, start to finish,
so I don't think I'm repeating any advice here.

When someone is tailgating you,
and they will since you are riding slower and safer when you first start out,
remember your MSF instruction, and slow down even more.
Despite the urge to speed up so you aren't pissing anybody off,
You need to leave that extra room in front of you because the jerk behind you isn't.

My dad taught me the following about working with electric, and it seems to apply to riding.
Most folks go thru three stages when learning electric / riding,
most start off scared,
then get cocky / overconfident.
then have a healthy dose of respect for it.
Unfortunately, something bad ususally has to happen before you get to stage three.
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Old 02-16-2011, 09:31 AM   #504
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MoDoc says

Every springtime be ever watchful because cagers are not. . .

Practice Practice Practice confidence building. . .

"Know" your bike, don't just ride it. . . . (i.e. Avatar "I seeeee you"). . .

Practice Practice Practice emergency stopping. . .

Your horn and high beams are your friends and maybe your salvation. Use them a lot. . . .

Ride with patients. Don't get mad at a 3500 lb. cager. . .you will loose. .

ATGAT! Learn it, Use it, Ride it. It could save your life. . . . I've seen it work! (yes, even hoggers need it..... but that's a hopeless cause, wouldn't you say?)

Save your passengers life. Don't let them on until you are ready to put them on. . .

That's enough for now. Remember, this all becomes second nature to you BUT be ever vigilant. This is an ongoing and great experience!
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Old 02-16-2011, 09:41 AM   #505
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The S.M.I.D.S.Y.




Quote:
Originally Posted by MoDoc View Post
Your horn and high beams are your friends and maybe your salvation. Use them a lot. . . .

This is a matter of opinion. I recommend very limited use of both horn and high beams. (high beams are for seeing after dark)
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Old 02-16-2011, 10:09 AM   #506
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I dont know if someone mentioned this before but i'll do it again, some tyre's are really slippery when new, especially knobbie's. Night riding, dont, if you can avoid it, the risk of colliding with wildlife for example, must be ten fold. Try not to get into a race with your riding buddie's, the closest 'almost' situations i've had, were racing someone, last one being with a hot sport's Mercede's i was trying to get off my tail, eventually i lost the sight of him in the mirror's, and once again said to myself, what an idiot i am!
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Old 02-16-2011, 10:56 AM   #507
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Counter steering, i know it's been flogged to death on this and other riding forums, but i think for someone just starting to ride, to learn to use the front brake right and to learn to 'steer' the bike, are skil's that come real handy, sooner or later.
Bright coloured vest's and jacket's, wear one myself, but one that you can see lot further is the fluorescent helmet, Friend of mine has a green Schubert helmet and it's like a bloody beacon, really stick's out, not forgetting the 'weave' of course.
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Old 02-16-2011, 12:45 PM   #508
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Metal Bridge Grating

Quote:
Originally Posted by duck View Post
Metal plates are slick when wet.

When riding grooved pavement or metal bridge decks, relax and keep the front wheel pointed forward. Depending upon the tires and bike, different ones will tend to make the front wheel want to track to some extent. All you need to do is not fight it and keep the bike pointed in the general direction you want to go.
Exactly, Just relax and ride through it. The bike will still steer OK but it will feel a little weird, like it wants to run in different tracks. No worries. . .
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Old 02-16-2011, 01:26 PM   #509
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MoDoc View Post

Ride with patients. Don't get mad at a 3500 lb. cager. . .you will loose. .
Ride with patients? What sort of patients? I mean, obviously they need to be well enough to sit on the bike...
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Old 02-16-2011, 11:46 PM   #510
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1. Always turn your head and look to where you are going. When trying to avoid something look to where you want to go...DO NOT look at the thing you are trying to avoid.

2. While you're a newbie get into the habit of riding with your wrist lower than the handlebar...that way if you need to grab the front brake in a hurry you will be sure to back off the accelerator at the same time. (as opposed to panicking and grabbing the brake while throttle is still on.)

3. When stopping in traffic leave a little more room between you and the vehicle in front than you would in a car. Pull up with the bike in first gear, with clutch in and right foot on the brake - then check your rear view mirror. This way if it ever looks like someone isn't going to stop behind you in time (rear ending you) you are already prepared to take off and get out of the way - or can move forward a little to give yourself extra room. (this has saved my life more than once in Sydney traffic)

4. wash your bike regularly - not so much to keep it clean as much as to give you a good chance to inspect every square inch of the thing.

Chances are you will be too lazy to do regular maintenance for the hell of it....but while washing you will notice tyres that are looking worse for wear or flatish....throttles that don't return to off when you take your hand off... leaky brake lines....oil leaks....petrol leakes......a worn sprocket or chain that needs lube. It's also an idea time to check all lights are working.

That's it for now.
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