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Old 04-20-2011, 07:37 PM   #586
Moving Pictures
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Originally Posted by Frank Sosa View Post
I'I have one quiet bike and one extremely loud bike compencycle.
Fixed that for you.

Oh, and I agree with the horn use. It's a handy device for nabbing attention with a quick "poot-poot" when some idiot cager is backing up blind, creeping into your zone, that sorta thing.
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Old 04-22-2011, 05:21 AM   #587
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eye contact

Eye contact works just great, "if" you're standing next to the person and the car/motorcycle is nowhere to be seen.

Eye contact gets alot of new riders hurt, "he was looking right at me", well no he wasn't, he was looking right past you and had no idea you were even there. Drivers don't see bikes, they don't look for them, they look for cars and trucks. If you expect that you have eye contact and ride that way, one day that person will pull right out in front of you.

Bill H.
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Old 04-22-2011, 06:30 PM   #588
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best advice: Don't listen to advice unless you have great confidence in the rider giving it.

my advice: Buy Keith Code's Twist of the Wrist 2 and watch his video. Practice everything he teaches. Take courses where you can get reliable advice from those who know.

no brainers: don't drink and ride, don't show off, don't trust anything else that is moving.
AND number one best advice, when you think you are getting really good at riding, that is when you will get into trouble. highest fatalities occur in the first 6 months, decline for 18 months and then at 2 years when the confidence is building the fatalities come to the same level as beginners.
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Old 04-22-2011, 08:33 PM   #589
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best advice: Don't listen to advice unless you have great confidence in the rider giving it.
Yeah, like strangers on the Internet.
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Old 04-23-2011, 12:21 AM   #590
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Quote:
Originally Posted by griffin800 View Post
Eye contact works just great, "if" you're standing next to the person and the car/motorcycle is nowhere to be seen.

Eye contact gets alot of new riders hurt, "he was looking right at me", well no he wasn't, he was looking right past you and had no idea you were even there. Drivers don't see bikes, they don't look for them, they look for cars and trucks. If you expect that you have eye contact and ride that way, one day that person will pull right out in front of you.

Bill H.
It's not the eye contact that gets people hurt, it's taking the eye contact for meaning throw caution out the window. I advise eye contact and proceed with caution if it is indeed safe to go and be prepared to do as necessary if the driver of the other vehicle does something that is a danger to you. No eye contact and proceeding (in the case of a intersection or something) is not safe at all. What I mean by eye contact is seeing the other persons eyes obviously if you can't see their eyes they haven't seen you. You know when you're at a 2,3 or 4 way intersection and there is a driver looking in the opposite direction as you to see if it is safe and they don't even look once in your direction? That's a good indication to stay stopped, put on the brakes or . . . you get the picture. but yes you're right taking eye contact to proceed as if there is no present danger is dangerous and I'm sorry if some took what i said in an earlier post to mean that. That's certainly not what I meant.
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Old 04-23-2011, 01:49 AM   #591
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best advice: Don't listen to advice unless you have great confidence in the rider giving it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by duck View Post
Yeah, like strangers on the Internet.
Better still ask a professional trainer...their livelihood depends on giving appropriate advise.

When in doubt go back to basics which are those techniques that give a system of control and roadcraft to cover most situations ... they are called basics for a reason.
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Old 04-23-2011, 04:10 PM   #592
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The #1 cause of collisions with motorcycles is the left turning car. (or the one pulling out from a side street/lot)

NEVER look to the eyes. LOOK to the wheels. Wheels NEVER lie.

The problem is not their eyes. Their eyes actually do see you. Their eyes send it to their brain and it is their brain that filters you out as the brain is not programmed for acknowledging motorcycles.

You want their brain to see you? Add lateral motion. Do a little 3' lane weave far in advance and their brains will see you.


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Hi Dakez

Not sure if this vid has been posted here before ... apologies if it has.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eqQBu...layer_embedded

The weave helps 'break' the camouflage effect. It also seems to have the effect of making tailgaters back off
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Old 04-23-2011, 08:24 PM   #593
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Better still ask a professional trainer...your life depends upon them giving appropriate advise.
Fixt.
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Old 04-23-2011, 08:47 PM   #594
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Hi Dakez

Not sure if this vid has been posted here before ... apologies if it has.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eqQBu...layer_embedded

The weave helps 'break' the camouflage effect. It also seems to have the effect of making tailgaters back off

It has but that is OK. Nothing wrong with re-posting such a good video that will help save a lot of rider from the looming vision limitations all humans have. The great thing is that once a driver’s brain picks up a rider that does the lane weave their brain is forever programmed to see riders.

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Old 04-24-2011, 03:49 AM   #595
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Originally Posted by BCMike View Post
What an awesome thread!

I am adding nothing new here, but felt that repeating good advice is a good practice.

Rule #1: Assume everything and everyone is trying to kill you and ride accordingly.

Rule #2: If in doubt about what's happening on the road, see Rule #1.

Rule #3: NEVER ride after drinking alcohol. No, "just one beer" is NOT ok!

Rule #4: Check tires for obvious problems (nails, cuts, tread depth, etc.) and for correct air pressure before EVERY ride. Yes, even if it's just down the block.

Rule #6: Strive to ride smoothly and predictably at all times. You will become a more efficient rider - not necessarily faster, but much less drama and fewer "OMG" moments.

Rule #7: Assume everything and everyone is trying to kill you and ride accordingly. (Did I get that one already? )

cheers,
Mike

What's Rule #5?

It's been mentioned already but this simplifies it nicely - If you can't stop in the distance you can see, you're going too fast.

Also, you should drive your car (truck etc) with the same attention you ride. It's worth mentioning that everything you do to ride safely, can be applied and practiced to drive safely, which in turn makes your fellow motorcyclists safer when you're in your cage. And when you eye-contact a rider, acknowledge that you see them with a nod or appropriate gesture - let them know that you weren't just looking in their direction and not seeing.

towie247 screwed with this post 04-24-2011 at 05:59 AM Reason: I felt like it.
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Old 04-24-2011, 05:47 AM   #596
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Screwdrivers

There is such a thing as a Jap screwdriver, they have less of a point so that you won't strip the screws. The screws are usually marked with some type of a dot or star next to one of the openings. I ended up putting allens in mine after having to tap one of these things out of my carb.
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Old 04-24-2011, 07:48 AM   #597
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Originally Posted by towie247 View Post
What's Rule #5?

It's been mentioned already but this simplifies it nicely - If you can't stop in the distance you can see, you're going too fast.
I submit this is one of those "rules" that sounds good but is impossible to implement in the real world.

Here on the twisty roads of N. Arkansas if I never rode faster than I could see to stop, I'd be doing about 35mph everywhere I went, and getting smooshed from behind about once an hour. (But at least the slow poke Harleys would seem normal then.)

Blind turns, popup hills, etc. are just a fact of life.
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Old 04-24-2011, 08:16 AM   #598
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Great thread! Of course as a nooby, I screwed up in the parking lot of the dealership. Havent rode a bike in over 30 years. Took the MTC safety course and did great. Got TOO CONFIDENT!! Well, needless to say it was very embarrassing and humiliating. My friend with me who has ridden for years told me, "dont worry about it!" "Its going to happen!" "Its happened to me!" Dont let it deter you from your excitement of wanting to ride! It will take alot of time and practice. trust me, it had me second guessing myself at first, but now, like riding a horse and getting thrown off!! Get back on it and let yourself overcome any fears or doubts! Well, now after my bike gets repaired, it will be weeks of practice in a controlled environment and not getting TOO CONFIDENT. Take my time and become more familiar with my new KLR and build confidence over many months and many years of continuing practice! But not get complacent!
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Old 04-24-2011, 10:17 AM   #599
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is fear based motorcycle discourse outdated?

It looks like I'm going to be the devil's advocate of this thread (again) but I'd like to address this business of riding like everybody's trying to kill you, all cars are mindless hunks of steel, etc. Though I've preached those very same lines myself, in my lifetime of consistent riding experience and witnessing lives drastically altered by accidents I have come to a different conclusion.

While, I agree that ALL VEHICLES PRESENT A PRESENT DANGER, how one reacts to that danger is the crux of my conclusion that one should not react with fear and the fear based discourse of motorcycle safety should be re-examined. For example, you're riding at night on a twisty road, perhaps it's raining, a car is approaching, perhaps he's going too fast. As a driver you're anticipating his every move, planning an escape route in case he comes into you're lane, etc. You're mind is totally concentrating on the perceived potential danger, all the while there is a deer standing in the bushes a few yards from the road, one shiny eye is the only sign of this, but you missed it because your entire concentration was on the car.

Though the language of fear is pretty standard par for the discourse of motorcycle safety I think it is a mistake. I think one should be EVER PRESENT while riding not ever fearful. Like attracts like. Fear attracts trouble for the reasons I stated above.

I have contemplated this for a long time but the thing about motorcycling is that it is indeed dangerous, riding around folks talking on cellphones, in cages, disconnected from reality. Before the cell phones came I was mad at fast food, I witnessed people driving that would rather not drip ketchup on their workshirts than to be present while driving and this would anger me. Us motorcyclists ride in very dangerous conditions but we should remember that we undertook to ride knowing full well the dangers. We've accepeted (if you haven't you should) the risk and the possibility for the consequences. If you have not accepted the reality of the dangers of motorcycling than you are kidding yourself with delusion. TRUST? Am I saying to trust everybody else on the road? In a sense I am. Not in the way to say "hey just trust everybody you'll be fine chap don't be scared, just go for it." No not at all. However, the act of getting on a bike on public streets and highways is to put your life in a lot of other drivers hands, it requires a huge amount of Trust. To think you are alive because of your own skills is a wee bit arrogant. Sure we put our skills to the test everyday (and we should constantly strive to refine those skills) and it saves our asses all the time however have you ever pondered the mass amount of cooperation it requires for there to even be public roads? If you think about it, when we ride, we are participating in a huge example of mass cooperation. It's kind of a miracle if you really stop to think about it. Trust? Hmm.

About 8 or so years ago my brother who was a noob at the time decided he wanted to ride and on his first week of riding he was struck head on by another vehicle. We almost lost him. He made it though (minus one arm and a lot of pain endured daily to this day).

So, in short I'm suggesting that the whole fear based riding thing be re-examined. I'm no longer a believer myself.
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Old 04-24-2011, 10:36 AM   #600
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Originally Posted by Rottweiler View Post
I submit this is one of those "rules" that sounds good but is impossible to implement in the real world.

Here on the twisty roads of N. Arkansas if I never rode faster than I could see to stop, I'd be doing about 35mph everywhere I went, and getting smooshed from behind about once an hour. (But at least the slow poke Harleys would seem normal then.)

Blind turns, popup hills, etc. are just a fact of life.
I suggest you find a big lot, maybe take a track day and practice full stop breaking at speeds appropriate to your conditions. I live in the twisties too and I think it's a fine rule and possible to implement. Deer on the side of the road everyday. Around here you better be driving a speed possible to stop or the deer (or whatever else) will get you sooner than later.

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